Plant-Based Education
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Schools TV - For the Juniors - Farm to Table

Schools TV - For the Juniors - Farm to Table | Plant-Based Education | Scoop.it
Schools TV programs are broadcast on ABC Television between 10:00am and 12noon weekdays throughout the schools terms

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Tahmina Mohammad's curator insight, April 22, 2013 3:06 AM

This website is fantastic for teaching lower primary students about how people and technologies link to produce goods and services which satisfy needs and wants. The website provides episode information for a series titled; Farm to Table for students aged 6-8 years. Each series is arranged in groups of programs related to the production of different foods such as; honey, milk, apples and rice. Watching the apple, honey, rice and milk programs allows students develop an appreciation for the environment, and an understanding that there is an interdependence between people and the environment (NSW Board of Studies, 2007, p.13). 

 

Students construct knowledge and develop a deeper understanding of what happens to some of the foods they use on a daily basis before they reach the supermarket shelves. Deeper learning and metacognitive skills are encouraged through the interactive features on the website such as; animations and cartoons which prompt students to question or think about the issues raised in the program. The website includes teacher resources, and follow up activities for each series and are specifically designed for teaching in Human Society and It's Environment (HSIE). The suggested classroom and workstation activities are effective because they are student-centered. Using teacher centered classroom activities rather than traditional teacher- centered activities will enhance student motivation which will in-turn increase learning. As suggested by Brown (2008) “children learn more by doing and experiencing rather than by reading, and listening to content” (p.30). The collective work of theorists; John Dewey, Jean Piaget, and Lev Vygotsky are responsible for the transition to student-centered learning environments. 

 

The television series and website activities help students understand the important role technology plays in producing goods and getting them to the supermarkets. As a follow-up activity students can gather infromation and investigate about the different Australian farming technology used in rice farming (for land preparation, irrigation, and sowing seeds and harvesting the crop). In order to develop intercultural understanding, students can use the rice program on this website as well as 'Pak Yono’s Paddy Field: Growing rice in Indonesia Book' to create a collage or poster comparing how rice is grown and farmed in Australia to Indonesia. The series about Rice on the ABC website promotes intercultural understanding, ecological sustainability and life long learning (values and attitudes). In the rice video, a father and son who are in the supermarket show how various cultural groups within our multicultural society eat rice, and in turn students develop an appreciation for why people eat and prepare rice in different ways. 

 

 As a literacy link (English WS1.9 & WS1.10) students can write a simple procedure using sentence beginners such as; First the worker bees ________________, Then other worker bees __________________ etc. From their written procedures, students can use drama such as stepping into the shoes of; Queen bee, worker bee, bee farmer, transporter, or consumer to explain their role and responsibilities in the production of honey. This activity will encourage students to understand that workers can be either human or animal (bees and bee farmers, factory workers, honey transporters, supermarket workers etc). Furthermore, it will allow students identify the raw materials used to produce different goods. Students will become aware that their food needs are generally met by supermarkets and shops. 

 

REFERENCE
Brown, K.J. (2008). Student- Centered Instruction: Involving Students in their own Education. Music Educators Journal, 94 (5), pp. 30-35. 

 

New South Wales Board of Studies. (2007). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Author. Retrieved on 12th April 2013

http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/go/hsie


New South Wales Board of Studies. (2007). English K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Author. Retrieved on 11th April 2013 from http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/go/english 

Hannah Dineley's comment, May 1, 2013 9:59 AM
This is a great opportunity for students to take what they are learning in all aspects and share their findings with the community. They also are advocating gardening fresh slow grown food, that is wholesome and nutritious!
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Agriculture is Everywhere

Farmers Fight is a student-led initiative to reconnect American society to the world of agriculture. Beginning with university students, Farmers Fight encour...

 

This video makes several important points about agricultural production within our modernized world, things that often go unnoticed and taken for granted.  Food for thought. 


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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, February 27, 2014 11:58 AM

The video brings attention to the complex process that brings food, and sheets, into our lives. Agriculture is often overlooked and undesirable. The video gives a young face to agriculture.

 

Payton Sidney Dinwiddie 's curator insight, October 25, 2014 6:27 PM

I like this article because it shows that most of the things we do is related to agriculture there are so many things we take for granted  and things that people dont recongnize have to deal with agriculture its almost surprising after watching this I believe that people who do agriculture need more respect

Bella The Non-Vampire's curator insight, December 1, 2014 5:11 AM

Agriculture involves everyone. People today dont think about where their food comes from. They don't think about how their food is made. Which is all agriculture.  Now agriculture has faded where no one remembers it still exists. Agriculture is something we include in our daizly lives. The big process of food. 

I.C.

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Genetically Modified Crops Not the Solution for "Feeding The World"

Genetically Modified Crops Not the Solution for "Feeding The World" | Plant-Based Education | Scoop.it

April 23, 2012 Biosafety Information Center

A review article in the Agronomy for Sustainable Development journal concludes that GM crops will not only not feed the world, they are hampering efforts to sustainably feed the world by jeopardizing existing biological and genetic diversity. http://www.biosafety-info.net/article.php?aid=965

 

We reproduce the abstract here. The full article is available at http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13593-013-0138-9

 

HOW NOT TO "FEED THE WORLD" http://sco.lt/6fKNnN

 

HOW MONSANTO CONTROLS OUR FOOD, POISONS OUR LAND AND INFLUENCES ALL THREE BRANCHES OF GOVERNMENT  http://www.truth-out.org/news/item/15856-how-monsanto-went-from-selling-aspirin-to-controlling-our-food-supply

 

“STUNNING: DIFFERENCE OF GM FROM NON-GM CORN http://sco.lt/5X53bt

 

April 25, 2013 Earth In Transition
SOY - THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE POISONOUS - A SCORECARD ON SOME OF BEST KNOWN SOY PRODUCTS http://www.earthintransition.org/2013/04/soy-the-good-the-bad-and-the-poisonous/

 

March 14, 2013 Al Jazeera VIDEO REPORT
ARGENTINA'S BAD SEEDS: THE HUMAN COSTS OF GMO SOY http://www.aljazeera.com/programmes/peopleandpower/2013/03

 

THE GLOBAL CONTROL OF FOOD, COUNTRIES AND POPULATIONS http://sco.lt/4kuXlB

 

Feb 25, 2013 Guardian Sustainable Business

OUR GLOBAL FOOD SYSTEM IS DANGEROUSLY OUT OF CONTROL, WHAT ARE THE SOLUTIONS?  http://www.guardian.co.uk/sustainable-business/fairtrade-report-treatment-smallholder-farmers

 

Feb 2, 2013  - John Vidal, The Guardian -

IT'S HARD TO TRUST GENETICALLY MODIFIED FOOD WHEN IT IS IN THE GRIP OF A FEW GLOBAL GIANTS | John Vidal - The Observer http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2013/feb/03/gm-food-grip-global-giants

 

GENETIC ENGINEERING AND THE GMO INDUSTRY: CORPORATE HIJACKING OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE http://www.scoop.it/t/agriculture-gmos-pesticides/p/3994750421/corporate-hijacking-of-food-and-agriculture-genetic-engineering-and-the-gmo-industry

 

OBAMA QUIETLY DE-REGULATES GMO/ GENETIC BIOTECH INDUSTRY  : Fast-tracking approvals, waiving regulations ...  http://sco.lt/5uCx8b

 

 

 

BOYS WITH BOOBS: HIDDEN CHEMICALS FED TO KIDS CAN IMPACT THEIR HEALTH http://www.huffingtonpost.com/beth-greer/bpa-health_b_2808888.html?ir=Green

 

FAST FOOD, SLOW DEATH  : "Food Deserts" and the $500 Billion Corporate Food Monopoly http://sco.lt/6YRaUr

 

PROCESSED FOODS MAKE UP 70 PERCENT OF THE US DIET - WITH ABOUT 5,000 DIFFERENT CHEMICALS http://sco.lt/7FPtxZ

 

THINK THOSE CHEMICALS IN YOUR FOOD HAVE BEEN TESTED?  http://sco.lt/9H5h4L

 

++++WATCH;

KITV HONOLULU, HAWAII INVESTIGATIVE VIDEO REPORT -

FOOD FOR THOUGHT - THE GMO DEBATE PART 3  http://news.msn.com/politics/video?videoid=db02dc7f-a5ba-4377-9853-d934d70a2eca&ap=true&OCID=MSNNWS

 

 

 

PESTICIDE LOBBY SPENDS MILLIONS TO DEFEND CHEMICALS TIED TO BEE DEATHS AND HUMAN HEALTH  http://sco.lt/8nhcsT

 

April 12, 2013 - Honey Colony - Mark Bittman
PESTICIDES:  NOW MORE THAN EVER THE THREAT IS MORE ACUTE THAN EVER http://www.honeycolony.com/article/pesticides-now-more-than-ever/

 

THE CURSE OF PETROLEUM-BASED FERTILIZERS http://sco.lt/7oRwsT

 

PESTICIDES USE RAMPING UP AS GMO CROP TECHNOLOGY BACKFIRES: STUDY http://ow.ly/eb2NH

 

October 3, 2012:

HOW GMOs UNLEASHED A PESTICIDE GUSHER http://www.carighttoknow.org/gmos_unleashed_a_pesticide_gusher

 

8 WAYS CORPORATIONS ARE POISONING OUR FOOD, WATER AND THE EARTH http://sco.lt/5bh1g9

 

+++++++WATCH:

"GENETIC ROULETTE - THE GAMBLE OF OUR LIVES"  - YouTube 1:24:59  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GrWRzxMUfDE

 


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Alicia Milanowski's comment, May 7, 2013 8:37 PM
Wow! Wow! Wow! This is shocking indeed. So informational and so crucial. It is amazing how naive I am when it comes what I am buying and eating. This was truly eyeopening and it truly motivates me to want investigate further!
Kari Rose's comment, May 9, 2013 2:44 PM
This has def changed my mind on alot of the food that we take into our bodies and that we are not aware of.
pdjmoo's curator insight, April 1, 2015 4:22 PM
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YOU ARE INVITED TO FOLLOW MY NEWS AGGREGATES [url=/u/179070 x-already-notified=1]pdjmoo[/url]

 

▶  CLIMATE CHANGE http://www.scoop.it/t/changingplanet

▶  BIODIVERSITY http://www.scoop.it/t/biodiversity-is-life

▶  OUR OCEANS http://www.scoop.it/t/our-oceans-need-us

▶  OUR FOOD http://www.scoop.it/t/agriculture-gmos-pesticides

▶  CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY http://www.scoop.it/t/environmental-and-human-health

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Hey! I Think I Grew This!

Hey! I Think I Grew This! | Plant-Based Education | Scoop.it
Students all across the United States, United Kingdom and even Australia and India, are joining a new trend - organic gardening in school. Their schools have their own gardens in the backyards, where students, under the guidance of their teachers ...

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Sara Hocamp's curator insight, May 1, 2013 8:25 PM

I love this! This will hopefully make children excited about eating healthy organic garden produce!

Stacey Tamai's comment, May 3, 2013 2:17 PM
I absolutely agree and have proven this myself! Take it a step further and send some of the produce home with the students along with recipes so that it can now be a family adventure!
Holland Bass's comment, May 7, 2013 3:19 AM
I remember growing radishes in 2nd grade. I never knew what a radish was at the time. It opened my eyes to different types of foods.
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Why School Gardens Matter: Organic Gardening

Why School Gardens Matter: Organic Gardening | Plant-Based Education | Scoop.it
Although gardening may not seem typical of an urban teenager’s education, it has become a central experience for many students across the country. See how one teacher in Harlem has changed the lives of her students forever.

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Hannah Dineley's comment, May 1, 2013 10:13 AM
Not only do you change a students perception of where there food comes from but you can relax your students as well. Teach them to stop and smell the flowers. As cliche as this saying is, a garden is very theraputic and helps us reconnect to nature.
Katie Ketelsen's comment, May 1, 2013 10:14 AM
Completely agree Hannah -- thanks for the comment!
Brittany Anne Garcia's comment, May 7, 2013 1:01 AM
this is a really great article. It really shows you the impact that gardening can have on kids. They want to get more involved in planting and it also shows that they are still able to go and have fun but in the dirt and growing something that they know is healthy for them.
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Missouri Department of Education Overlooks Importance of Agriculture

It is important that the wording be clarified to keep these programs strong in the state of Missouri. “Agricultural education is critical to students across the state. Agricultural education in high schools serves as a starting place for ...

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Hannah Dineley's comment, May 1, 2013 10:16 AM
We must stay involved and fight for these types of programs otherwise they will be taken away.
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Home Grown School Feeding -- good for farmers and children

Home Grown School Feeding -- good for farmers and children | Plant-Based Education | Scoop.it

School meals - as good for farmers as they are for children?

 

The International School Meals Day is a new UK/US initiative designed to raise awareness of the importance of food and nutrition to education and share school feeding experiences from across the globe. In this spirit of sharing global experiences, it is worth examining a government-led movement in sub-Saharan Africa that is developing sustainable school feeding programmes that have the potential to increase access to education while at the same time combating food security and improving agricultural production...Simply put, children who don't eat don't learn. As shown in Rethinking School Feeding, a joint analysis conducted by the World Bank, World Food Programme and Partnership for Child Development, hunger restricts education...

 

...The solution is clear: local food for local children. From this, a new African-led movement, known as Home Grown School Feeding (HGSF) is beginning to take hold. Home Grown School Feeding programmes provide an opportunity to benefit both schoolchildren and smallholder farmers by creating a stable, structured market for local produce. The advantages of linking local agriculture and school feeding are substantial, resulting in more prosperous smallholder farmers, with a more secure future; stronger rural communities, with more stable economies; increased demand for local, fresh food; and healthier, happier children...

 

...Other examples include Kenya, where the Ministry of Agriculture through the Njaa Marufuku Kenya (Swahili for Eliminate Hunger in Africa) provides agricultural training, income generation training and funding to schools and the wider community to enable them to support their own school feeding programmes...

 

...Across Africa, HGSF policies and plans, of one form or another, are being implemented by governments in Botswana, Ivory Coast, Ethiopia, Namibia, Nigeria, Rwanda, Tanzania and South Africa. HGSF has already delivered strong development outcomes, but there are still several important gaps in our knowledge about the effectiveness of HGSF in areas such as the nutritional impact of using local foods, entrepreneurial opportunities across the supply chain, and income gain for smallholder farmers. Development groups such as the World Bank, WFP and PCD are working with governments to build the evidence base around what works and how best to support the development of sustainable nationally owned school feeding programmes.


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Organic Ojai :: The Farmer and The Cook

Organic Ojai :: The Farmer and The Cook | Plant-Based Education | Scoop.it
An organic cafe in Ojai, California serving hand-made Mexican food along with smoothies, juices, salad bar, chai and pastries. The week-end cafe includes pizza and farm specials.
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Hannah Dineley's comment, May 1, 2013 10:17 AM
Local restaurant that is truly farm-to-table, where even you can volunteer on its CSA.
Sara Hocamp's comment, May 7, 2013 12:03 AM
Really?? That's awesome! I love that there are more restaurants that are trying to become more organic. I love the fact that this restaurant is farm-to-table! I wish more places were like this
Sara Hocamp's comment, May 7, 2013 12:03 AM
How do you volunteer?
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Green Schools – Rethinking Our Approach to Schooling - Fellow ...

Green Schools – Rethinking Our Approach to Schooling - Fellow ... | Plant-Based Education | Scoop.it
Image if your child came home from school excited as could be because they had been learning how to plant trees. Or what if your kindergartner started asking you to buy more organic tomatoes and kale at the store, instead ...
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California School Garden Network

California School Garden Network | Plant-Based Education | Scoop.it

California School Garden Network


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Jessica Vega's comment, April 23, 2014 8:13 PM
this a good idea to get students involve eating healthy. some students get excited to eat something that they grow themselves. another things it's because they learn about how a garden is being grown so you are not only teaching them to eat healthy but they are also learning about growth.
Jessica Vega's curator insight, April 23, 2014 8:15 PM

this a good idea to get students involve eating healthy. some students get excited to eat something that they grow themselves. another things it's because they learn about how a garden is being grown so you are not only teaching them to eat healthy but they are also learning about growth. 

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Amy Kalafa: School Lunch REVOLUTIONARY - Organic Connections

Amy Kalafa: School Lunch REVOLUTIONARY - Organic Connections | Plant-Based Education | Scoop.it
Filmmaker and school lunch revolutionary Amy Kalafa is a key figure in the school lunch revolution. From her groundbreaking documentary Two Angry Moms to her book Lunch Wars, getting better food for our kids has become.

 

Cineasta y almuerzo escolar revolucionario Kalafa Amy es una figura clave en la revolución de almuerzo escolar. Desde sus pioneros documental de dos mamás enojadas con sus guerras reservar el almuerzo, cada vez mejor alimento para nuestros hijos se ha convertido.


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To Close Loop of Sustainability, Organic Farm Commits to Local and Seasonal Eating Education

To Close Loop of Sustainability, Organic Farm Commits to Local and Seasonal Eating Education | Plant-Based Education | Scoop.it
Scanning the beautiful array of certified organic crops that thrive at McGrath Family Farms in Camarillo, you know you’re in the presence of something truly special. Phil McGrath is a fourth-generation Southern California farmer.
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School Garden Wizard

School Garden Wizard | Plant-Based Education | Scoop.it

Gardening and plant-based learning open a door to discovery of the living world. It stimulates even as it focuses and calms. Within the school environment, a garden offers an unparalleled platform to help kids achieve learning goals in ways that are recommended by the National Science Standards and most state and local educational bodies.

 

Chicago Botanic Garden

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Growing good habits - Waikato Times

Growing good habits - Waikato Times | Plant-Based Education | Scoop.it

A list of Farm to Table schools in New Zealand and their growing  success.

 

"Growing good habits. As the 8 year olds' laughter ripples through the kitchen in the Auckland school's hall, they dip their spoons into the bowl for another taste."


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Sue Blough's comment, May 2, 2013 12:12 AM
It makes sense to impart a healthy attitude towards food and the environment starting at a young age. I wish more schools could make room for this kind of education.
Mac Cagle's comment, May 7, 2013 2:42 AM
I like the idea of schools having a more direct connection with the world, as well as local industry. The teaching of food and where it comes from at this age is also good.
Andrea Coppinger's comment, May 7, 2013 7:25 PM
I think it's really cool that they are enforcing this way of thinking at such a young age. For children its super important to learn the difference between healthy and unhealthy foods.
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What Every Parent Should Know About Our Big Food Chemical Industry

What Every Parent Should Know About Our Big Food Chemical Industry | Plant-Based Education | Scoop.it

April 10, 2013 - RSN Godot

'Keeping our children from harm in today's chemically-saturated world is one of the great challenges of modern parenting.... http://readersupportednews.org/opinion2/448-farm-and-food-policy/16881-what-every-parent-should-know-about-monsanto

 

April 23, 2013 Science Daily
SCIENTIST URGE UN TO TAKE ACTION ON CHEMICALS IN CONSUMER PRODUCT AND PESTICIDES http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130423090809.htm

 

 

WAKE UP AND SMELL THE GMOs - A MOTHER'S VOICE http://sco.lt/9Dv6VF

 

FastCoDesign
WHAT GOOGLE'S CAFETERIAS CAN TEACH US ABOUT SCHOOL LUNCHES http://www.fastcodesign.com/1672319/what-google-s-cafeterias-can-teach-us-about-school-lunches?partner=newsletter

 

IS STRESS EDIBLE? http://sco.lt/8US8I5

 

WHAT ARE WE EATING? http://sco.lt/7RN917

 

April 13, 2013 New York Times
THINK THOSE CHEMICALS IN YOUR FOOD AND ENVIRONMENT HAVE BEEN TESTED? http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/14/sunday-review/think-those-chemicals-have-been-tested.html?_r=0

 

BOYS WITH BOOBS: HIDDEN CHEMICALS FED TO KIDS CAN IMPACT THEIR HEALTH http://www.huffingtonpost.com/beth-greer/bpa-health_b_2808888.html?ir=Green

 

February 8, 2012 Food Integrity Campaign
DROWNING IN HERBICIDE: MONSANTO IGNORES HEALTH CONCERNS http://www.foodwhistleblower.org/blog/23-2012/286-drowning-in-herbicide-monsanto-ignores-health-concerns

 

 

FAST FOOD, SLOW DEATH  : "Food Deserts" and the $500 Billion Corporate Food Monopoly http://sco.lt/6YRaUr

 

PROCESSED FOODS MAKE UP 70 PERCENT OF THE US DIET - WITH ABOUT 5,000 DIFFERENT CHEMICALS http://sco.lt/7FPtxZ

 

8 WAYS CORPORATIONS ARE POISONING OUR FOOD, WATER AND THE EARTH http://sco.lt/5bh1g9

 

"FOODOPOLY" -  EXPOSING THE HANDFUL OF CORPORATIONS THAT CONTROL OUR FOOD SYSTEM FROM SEED TO DINNER PLATE http://sco.lt/7YSrYX

 

WORLD'S LARGEST FOOD CORPORATIONS CREATING LEGACY OF DESTRUCTION  http://sco.lt/6sSzK5

 

PHARMACEUTICAL, ANTIBIOTIC, CHEMICAL, PESTICIDE POLLUTION IN OUR STREAMS, RIVERS AND DRINKING WATER http://sco.lt/7rpdbN

 

 

OBESITY, CANCER, DIABETES, PROCESSED FOODS, CHEMICALS, PESTICIDES - YOUR FOOD, YOUR HEALTH  With little or no independent peer reviewed research are we embarking on a dangerous human experiment that may alter the human genes for generations to come?
++++WATCH;

KITV HONOLULU, HAWAII INVESTIGATIVE VIDEO REPORT -

FOOD FOR THOUGHT - THE GMO DEBATE PART 3  http://news.msn.com/politics/video?videoid=db02dc7f-a5ba-4377-9853-d934d70a2eca&ap=true&OCID=MSNNWS

 

 

 

 

WHY EVERY PARENT SHOULD KNOW ABOUT THE AG=GAG BILL AND HOW OUR MEAT IS RAISED ON FACTORY FARMS http://sco.lt/7w0l05

 

ANTI-WHISTLE BLOWER AG-GAG LAWS AIMED AT KEEPING YOU IN THE DARK ABOUT YOUR FACTORY FARMED FOOD - PIGS, CHICKENS, VEAL, DAIRY, TURKEY, DUCKS http://sco.lt/7aFBUv

 

 

April 10, 2013 Health Impact News
BIG AGRICULTURE TAKES CONTROL OF CONGRESS - GETS IMMUNITY FROM GMO LAWSUITS http://healthimpactnews.com/2013/big-agriculture-takes-control-of-congress-gets-immunity-from-gmo-lawsuits/

 

BIOTECH AGRICHEMICAL CARTEL BUYS USA CONGRESS, OBAMA AND THE GLOBAL FARM http://sco.lt/8edR3Z

 

 

 

MONSANTO: A CORPORATE PROFILE From Saccharin to GE Seed - Chemicals for Food, Agriculture, War http://sco.lt/9Akull

 

 

 


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Kandace Mangold's comment, May 7, 2013 10:07 PM
I had no clue that Monsanto was creating seeds, I know someone that works their and they act like the company they work for is the best thing since sliced cheese.
Belinda Garcia's comment, May 8, 2013 12:51 AM
wow, this was eye opening!
Kari Rose's comment, May 9, 2013 2:43 PM
I def couldn't agree with you more on this. HUGE eye opener!
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Perry Pear Joins Ark of Taste | Food For Thought | Slow Food International - Good, Clean and Fair food.

Perry Pear Joins Ark of Taste | Food For Thought | Slow Food International - Good, Clean and Fair food. | Plant-Based Education | Scoop.it
Slow Food is a non-profit, eco-gastronomic member-supported organization that was founded in 1989 to counteract fast food and fast life, the disappearance of local food traditions and people‚ where it comes from, how it tastes and how our...

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Frank Kusters's comment, May 1, 2013 12:47 PM
Exactly.
Raziq's comment, May 2, 2013 10:14 AM
EXACTLY...
KatieMcDade's comment, May 6, 2013 11:07 PM
Took the words out of my mouth. Time to start supporting locally grown food.
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GROWE FOUNDATION - GARDEN TO TABLE - BOULDER - ORGANIC SCHOOL GARDENS

Our Love of Children Foundation was founded in 1999 by Bryce Winton Brown to promote the health and well-being of children and families. Out of Our Love of C...

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Hannah Dineley's comment, May 1, 2013 10:07 AM
Garden to table is such a great idea and opportunity for young students. Not only do these students take pride in what they harvest, they wil eat it to. Kids eat kale if they grow kale!
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Organic School Gardens | gardeningonlineshop.co.uk

Sneaky Composting -- Worm Tube In The GardenI have used a similar method to encourage worms in my tire gardens as well as my raised beds.

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Wellington Aquaponics's curator insight, January 3, 2013 6:48 PM

This has a matrix for planning an organic school garder

Hannah Dineley's comment, May 1, 2013 10:10 AM
Worms are an important part of the ecosystem of the garden. Worms turn the soil for us and are an essential part. By teaching our students about the good bugs in a garden they can further their love and appreciation for the smaller creatures that share this blue planet with us.
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Farm to School Internship « Talk of Townsend

The Food Trust's Farm to School Program seeks to improve children's health and strengthen family farms through increasing access to locally grown, healthy food in schools, along with providing nutrition and agricultural ...

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Hannah Dineley's comment, May 1, 2013 10:11 AM
More opportunities for everyone to get involved in the only thing that keeps us going, food!
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The Farm Bureau of Ventura County - Students & Teachers - AG in the Classroom, Farm Tours, Farm to School, Junior Master Gardener, California School Garden Network, 4H and FFA

The Farm Bureau of Ventura County - Students & Teachers - AG in the Classroom, Farm Tours, Farm to School, Junior Master Gardener, California School Garden Network, 4H and FFA | Plant-Based Education | Scoop.it
The Farm Bureau of Ventura County, Students & Teachers - AAG in the Classroom, Tour a Farm, Farm to School, Junior Master Gardener, California School Garden Network, 4H and FFA.
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Hannah Dineley's comment, May 1, 2013 10:14 AM
Thanks to programs like AgBio, FFA, 4H and more students are given opportunities, myself included, to visit other farms and see the real opporations of things.
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FOOD FOR THOUGHT OJAI - Home

FOOD FOR THOUGHT OJAI - Home | Plant-Based Education | Scoop.it
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Hannah Dineley's comment, May 1, 2013 10:15 AM
Food for Thought in Ojai, Ca has a wonderful program for their students to learn the basic of gardening with opportunities to go further and learn composting and how to use a green house.
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Organic Food vs. Conventional: What the Stanford Study Missed

Organic Food vs. Conventional: What the Stanford Study Missed | Plant-Based Education | Scoop.it
Stanford's report that organic foods may not be much healthier or more nutritious than their conventional counterparts has caused quite a stir. Food, clean from antibiotics, growth hormones and pesticide residue, should be a basic human right.

 

 

Yesterday's report out of Stanford that organic foods may not be much healthier or more nutritious than their conventional counterparts has caused quite a stir.

A deeper investigation into the study reveals a few things that the researchers failed to report.

While the scientists analyzed vitamins and minerals, food isn't simply a delivery device for these things alone. We are quickly learning in this industrialized food era that our food can be full of a lot of other things. It has become a delivery device for artificial colors, additives, preservatives, added growth hormones, antibiotics, pesticides, insecticides and so much more.

The term "organic" actually refers to the way agricultural products are grown and processed and legally details the permitted use (or not) of certain ingredients in these foods.

The details are that the U.S. Congress adopted the Organic Foods Production Act (OFPA) in 1990 as part of the 1990 Farm Bill which was then followed with the National Organic Program final rule published by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).

The standards include a national list of approved synthetic and prohibited non-synthetic substances for organic production, which means that organically produced foods also must be produced without the use of:

1)antibiotics

2)artificial growth hormones

3)high fructose corn syrup

4)artificial dyes (made from coal tar and petrochemicals)

5)artificial sweeteners derived from chemicals

6)synthetically created chemical pesticide and fertilizers

7)genetically engineered proteins and ingredients

8)sewage sludge

9)irradiation

 

According to the United States Department of Agriculture, these added ingredients are actually what differentiate organic foods from their conventional counterparts. Yet nowhere in that Stanford study, comparing organic food to conventional, are these things measured. There is no measure of the insecticidal toxins produced by a genetically engineered corn plant, no measure of the added growth hormones used in conventional dairy, no measure of the fact that 80 percent of the antibiotics used today are used on the chicken, pork, beef and animals that we eat.

Food is not just a delivery device for vitamins and minerals, as measured in the study, but it is also used as a delivery device for these substances that drive profitability for the food industry. To fail to measure these added ingredients, while suggesting that there is essentially no difference, is incomplete at best. Some might even go so far as to suggest that it is irresponsible in light of the fact that we are seeing such a dramatic increase in diet-related disease.

Additionally, anyone who knowingly sells or mislabels as organic a product that was not produced and handled in accordance with the regulations can be subject to a civil penalty of up to $10,000 per violation. In other words, if an organic producer were to add any one of the ingredients listed above, they would be fined.

WHY ORGANICS COST MORE

Admittedly, the high price of organic food can irritate anyone. But the scrutiny that these foods undergo is enormous and expensive, driving prices at the cash register and for those producing them on the farm. Why the costs? Because the cost structure on our food supply offers taxpayer-funded resources called subsidies to the farmers using genetically engineered seeds and saturating crops in insecticides and weed killers, while charging the organic farmers fees to prove that their crops are safe.

That's like getting fined to wear your seat belt.

So while conventional food production allows for the addition of cheap, synthetic and often controversial ingredients that have been disallowed, banned or never permitted for use in developed countries around the world, organic food carries the burden of having to prove that its products are safe -- products produced without the use of added non-food ingredients that other countries have found controversial or removed from their food supply.

In other words, it's an un-level playing field right now. And if we were all sitting down as a national family at our national dinner table, I don't think that any of us would want to be using our resources this way. Wouldn't we rather have the organic food be the one that we fund, making it cheaper, more affordable and more accessible to all Americans?

Or if given the choice, would we rather eat food hopped up on growth hormones, antibiotics and chemical pesticides? You can answer that.

And while correlation is not causation, in light of the growing rates of cancer, diabetes and other conditions affecting our families, the answer would appear to be "eat less chemicals."

But right now, the majority of the population does not have that choice. Food, clean from antibiotics, added growth hormones and excessive pesticide residue, should be a basic human right, afforded to all Americans, regardless of socioeconomic status.

WHERE TO START?

But since the high price of organic produce and a flawed food system that continues to charge organic farmers more to prove that their products, produced without ingredients that mounting scientific evidence has shown to cause harm, is still an insurmountable hurdle to the majority of the population, especially the growing number of unemployed, where can an American who wants to avoid these ingredients start?

Start with baby steps. None of us can do everything, but all of us can do something. And thankfully, foods without these controversial additives and ingredients are increasingly sold in grocery stores like Wal-Mart, Costco, Kroger and Safeway, which represent the largest single distribution channel, accounting for 38 percent of organic food sales in 2006. Look for milk labeled "RbGH-free" or look for products without high fructose corn syrup or artificial colors. A growing number of companies, from Kraft to Nestle, are producing them, because their employees have kids battling conditions like asthma, allergies, diabetes and cancer, too.

So maybe you rolled your eyes at this whole thing a few years ago, dismissing it as an expensive food fad. The Stanford study goes a long way towards reinforcing that. But read between the lines. You are smarter than you realize and braver than you think. And the love that you have for your family and your country can propel you to do things you could never imagine. So navigate the grocery store a bit differently, get involved with a food kitchen, a community garden, a child's school. And reach out to your legislators. They have families, too.

Because as the science continues to mount, from the Presidents Cancer Panel to the American Academy of Pediatrics, we are learning just how much the food we eat-- and the artificial ingredients being added to it -- can affect the health of our loved ones.


Via Giri Kumar
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Hannah Dineley's comment, May 1, 2013 10:20 AM
When asked organic vs. conventional I always choose organic and now have began to grow my own food. Because of the pesticides and herbacides used to spray the fields we are witnessing CCD. Small insect and birds, including the honey bee are dying because of the neurotoxins affecting their small bodies. If we don't take a stand soon and raise awareness about how important this small creature is it will be lost, along with us. Bees are our busy workers that pollinate our food. If we don't have bees we don't have real food.
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Chicago’s School Lunch Hero | Organic Connections

Chicago’s School Lunch Hero | Organic Connections | Plant-Based Education | Scoop.it
For an entire school year Mrs. Q blogged anonymously about the poor quality of school lunches in Chicago's Public Schools. She has now revealed her true identity as Sarah Wu, a speech pathologist in CPS and released a book called Fed Up with Lunch.

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Hannah Dineley's comment, May 1, 2013 10:23 AM
I myself am fed up with school lunches. Even prisoners in California are being fed better nutritious food than our youth in school. And we wonder why kids are being diagnosed with ADHD and have trouble paying attention in class. First if all they are hungry, and then once they eat they are jittery from the amount of sugar in their food. Being fed processed foods is setting up our youth for diaster.
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San Antonio Garden Project

San Antonio Garden Project | Plant-Based Education | Scoop.it

ProWorld Belize is doing a garden project in San Antonio.  It will provide some of the food for school lunches at the primary school.

 

"ProWorld Belize is working with a primary school in San Antonio, Belize to create a school garden.  ProWorld is working with teachers, cooking staff and community leaders to develop a curriculum that teaches the benefits of healthy eating and nutrition to the students.  The garden will provide fruits and vegetables for the school lunch program. In a community which is already made up of 90% farmers, this school garden will serve as a model of sustainable organic farming."


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Harvesting Potatoes at Granny's Garden School

Students at Loveland Primary School harvest potatoes from their school garden. Granny's Garden School garden coordinator Connie Bateman leads the lesson.

 

 


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