plant and fungi
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Rescooped by Wenjun Zhu from Publications
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Plant J: Deployment of Burkholderia glumae type III secretion system as an efficient tool for translocating pathogen effectors to monocot cells (2013)

Plant J: Deployment of Burkholderia glumae type III secretion system as an efficient tool for translocating pathogen effectors to monocot cells (2013) | plant and fungi | Scoop.it

Genome sequences of plant fungal pathogens have enabled the identification of effectors that cooperatively modulate the cellular environment for successful fungal growth and suppress host defense. Identification and characterization of novel effector proteins are crucial to understand pathogen virulence and host plant defense mechanisms. Previous reports indicate that the Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 type III secretion system (T3SS) can be used to study how non-bacterial effectors manipulate dicot plant cell function using the Effector Detector Vector (pEDV) system. Here we report a pEDV-based effector delivery system in which the T3SS of Burkholderia glumae, an emerging rice pathogen, is used to translocate the AVR-Pik and AVR-Pii effectors of fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae to rice cytoplasm. The translocated AVR-Pik and AVR-Pii showed avirulence activity when tested in rice cultivars containing the cognate R genes. AVR-Pik reduced and delayed the hypersensitive response triggered by B. glumae in the non-host plant Nicotiana benthamiana indicative of an immunosuppressive virulence activity. AVR proteins fused with fluorescent protein and nuclear localization signal were delivered by B. glumae T3SS and observed in the nuclei of infected cells in rice, wheat, barley and N. benthamiana. Our bacterial T3SS-enabled eukaryotic effector delivery and subcellular localization assays provide a useful method to identify and study effector functions in monocot plants.


Via Nicolas Denancé, Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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Freddy Monteiro's comment, March 10, 2013 12:50 PM
Nico, this paper comes in time to feature in the general discussion of my dissertation, in a section where I explore if a temporal effector translocation hirarchy would exist in R. solanacearum. I wanted to cite a couple papers characterizing effector translocation in planta and this one is a perfect fit. It is amazing how the principle behind the use of NLS, so common nowadays for the characterization of oomycete effectors, could be successfully applied to bacteria pathogens. I hope this method could be useful in the future to the validation (re-validation) of pathogen effector proteins. Thank you for sharing.
Rescooped by Wenjun Zhu from Plants and Microbes
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The Guardian: Ash dieback: scientists to utilise crowdsourcing in fight against fungus (2012)

The Guardian: Ash dieback: scientists to utilise crowdsourcing in fight against fungus (2012) | plant and fungi | Scoop.it

British scientists trying to beat ash dieback disease are seeking the "wisdom of the crowd" in order to analyse the genes of the fungus that causes it.

Genetic data collected from infected trees in Ashwellthorpe wood in Norfolk will be posted on the Sainsbury Laboratory website this Friday at the new OpenAshDieback site, with the aim of finding out what makes the fungus that causes dieback attack the ash – and the best methods to halt or slow its spread.

Prof Sophien Kamoun, the head of the Sainsbury Laboratory, which is doing the work jointly with the John Innes Centre in Norfolk, said that scientific emergencies such as ash dieback made standard methods – where publication is peer-reviewed in secret and eventually published – too slow to be useful.

"I do have a beef with the way that research is typically done," Kamoun said. "Scientists do genome sequencing but then hold onto it until it's formally published. This isn't appropriate in an emergency. Open sourcing the understanding of data in this way is totally adapted to the age of the internet."


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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Rescooped by Wenjun Zhu from Plants and Microbes
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Announcing Keystone Symposia’s 2013 Conference on “Plant Immunity: Pathways and Translation”

Announcing Keystone Symposia’s 2013 Conference on “Plant Immunity: Pathways and Translation” | plant and fungi | Scoop.it

Keystone Symposia is pleased to announce its conference on “Plant Immunity: Pathways and Translation,” taking place April 7-12, 2013 at Big Sky Resort in Big Sky, Montana, USA.

 

Organized by Sophien Kamoun of Sainsbury Laboratory and Ken Shirasu of RIKEN, the four-day conference will:

 

• Convene with a keynote address by Paul M. Schulze-Lefert of Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, followed by four days of stimulating plenary sessions, workshops and poster sessions;

• Highlight the latest developments in understanding plant immune pathways, how these pathways are perturbed by pathogens, and how plants and their parasites co-evolve;

• Address how basic knowledge on plant immunity can be translated into applications of relevance to agriculture and the profile of translational plant pathology research in an era of looming food crisis.

 

Scholarships are available to students and postdocs and require submission of a brief application and abstract. Short talks will also be selected from submitted abstracts. Discounted student registrations are available. Note that registering by the early registration deadline saves US$150 on later fees.

 

Deadlines:

• Scholarship and Abstract – December 6, 2012

• Late-Breaking Abstract – January 10, 2013

• Early Registration – February 7, 2013

 

To register and for more information, please visit www.keystonesymposia.org/13D5 and for an up-to-date meeting flyer, visit http://www.keystonesymposia.org/index.cfm?e=Web.Meeting.Flyer&MeetingID=1246.


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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