plant and food sciences
3 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by sergio contrerasliza from Plant and Seed Biology
Scoop.it!

Plants outweigh all other life on Earth

Plants outweigh all other life on Earth | plant and food sciences | Scoop.it
Plants pack more heft than any other kingdom of life on the planet, making up 80% of all the carbon stored in living creatures. That’s just one surprise in a comprehensive new survey of Earth’s biomass, which finds that groups with the greatest number of species—such as arthropods—aren’t necessarily the heaviest.

Via Loïc Lepiniec
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by sergio contrerasliza from Host-Microbe Interactions. Plant Biology.
Scoop.it!

Genome-wide identification of bacterial plant colonization genes

Genome-wide identification of bacterial plant colonization genes | plant and food sciences | Scoop.it
Author summary Plants fix carbon to create an abundance of sugars and amino acids, thus providing an enticing environment for microorganisms that reside in soil. Once these microorganisms have colonized the root environment, they can dramatically influence plant growth and development. We set out to identify a comprehensive set of microbial genes that control or influence root colonization, using a genome-wide transposon mutagenesis approach (randomly barcoded transposon sequencing [RB-TnSeq]). By using this method, we identified several hundred genes that, when mutated, affect the ability of the bacterium P. simiae to competitively colonize the root system of the model plant A. thaliana. These included many genes purported to be involved in carbohydrate metabolism, cell wall biosynthesis, and motility, underscoring the notion that sugar metabolism, defense, and motility are all key features of a root-colonizing microbe. We also identified several amino acid transport and metabolism genes with mutations that confer a fitness advantage in root colonization. Lastly, we identified several genes with no known function that significantly alter root colonization ability when mutated. These findings suggest novel engineering strategies to improve biological product development, and will facilitate the mechanistic exploration of the root colonization process.

Via Tatsuya Nobori
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by sergio contrerasliza from Articles Published by CIP Staff
Scoop.it!

Breeding Strategies to Enhance Drought Tolerance in Crops

Breeding Strategies to Enhance Drought Tolerance in Crops | plant and food sciences | Scoop.it
Rauf, S.; Al-Khayri, J.M.; Zaharieva, M.; Monneveux, P.; Khalil, F. 2016. Breeding strategies to enhance drought tolerance in crops. In: Al-Khayri, J.M.; Jain, S.M.; Johnson, D.V. (eds). Advances in plant breeding strategies: Agronomic, abiotic and biotic stress traits. Cham (Switzerland). Springer International Publishing. ISBN 978-3-319-22517-3. pp. 397-445.
This chapter discusses screening and breeding methods with emphasis on bridging the gap between genotype and phenotype. Some examples of success in the development of drought tolerant germplasm are presented.

Via International Potato Center (CIP)
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by sergio contrerasliza from Plants & Evolution
Scoop.it!

The coming of age of EvoMPMI: evolutionary molecular plant–microbe interactions across multiple timescales

Plant–microbe interactions are great model systems to study co-evolutionary dynamics across multiple timescales. However, mechanistic research on plant–microbe interactions has often been conducted with little consideration of evolutionary concepts and methods. Conversely, evolutionary research has rarely integrated the range of mechanisms and models from the molecular plant–microbe interactions field. In recent years, the incipient field of evolutionary molecular plant–microbe interactions (EvoMPMI) has emerged to bridge this gap. Here, we report on some of the recent advances in EvoMPMI. In particular, we highlight new systems to study microbe interactions with early diverging land plants, and new findings from studies of adaptive evolution in pathogens and plants. By linking mechanistic and evolutionary research, EvoMPMI promises to expand our understanding of plant–microbe interactions.

Via Pierre-Marc Delaux
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by sergio contrerasliza from WHEAT
Scoop.it!

Sat nav for bread wheat uncovers hidden genes

Sat nav for bread wheat uncovers hidden genes | plant and food sciences | Scoop.it
Scientists have created the most accurate navigation system for the bread wheat genome to date—allowing academics and breeders to analyse its genes more easily than ever before.

Via CIMMYT, Int.
more...
No comment yet.