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Music piracy on the decline as digital music sales grow | Wash Post

Music piracy on the decline as digital music sales grow | Wash Post | Pirated music | Scoop.it

Maybe music executives can finally stop singing the blues. Music piracy is on the decline, analysts say, while an industry group said digital music sales in 2012 drove global music industry revenues up for the first time since 1999.

 

It’s not a very big gain for the music industry — just 0.3 percent to $16.5 billion — but even that small uptick may be a sign that digital music has finally put the industry on the path to recovery. Digital music and services, the report said, grew 9 percent in the past year. That comprises digital downloads, as well as newer subscription services such as Spotify and ad-supported services including Pandora.

 

“No doubt, this is welcome news,” said Recording Industry Association of America spokesman Jonathan Lamy, who said over half of the industry’s revenues come from digital services now. “We are starting to turn the corner, and that’s great news for the business and fans.”

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Albert Lochard's insight:

Digital music is slowly killing music piracy. More people are preferring to listen to music through apps like Spotify and Pandora. Digital music and services grew 9 percent in the past year, according to reports. This is great news for people in the music industry and the fans that are willing to pay for music instead of using music piracy.

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Charles Bohart's curator insight, January 17, 2016 9:26 PM

In today's age, where the majority of my friends are pirating music the majority of the time, having a decline in piracy i welcome. Hopefully this minor uptick in legal digital downloads will snowball in the coming years and eradicate this problem.

JustTheBeginning's curator insight, February 9, 2016 10:08 PM

We're seeing times change not just over night but rapidly faster than usual with just about every big name company becoming a contender in the sweepstakes to providing the best music streaming services at the most convenient rate you gotta expect to see things get into tip top shape. Apps like Spotify, Apple Music, & etc are all in the ranks of running circles around the industry as a whole.

George Slight's curator insight, February 10, 2016 11:11 PM

This great news for the professional who is worried about sales. Until today I thought that music piracy was at an all time high, I'm glad to hear this news to prove me wrong and that the music field is thriving.

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Universal And Sony Music Plan 'Instant Pop' To Beat Piracy

Universal And Sony Music Plan 'Instant Pop' To Beat Piracy | Pirated music | Scoop.it

Ten years after piracy first began to ravage the music industry, Britain’s two biggest record labels will finally try to ...


Via Yvan Boudillet
Albert Lochard's insight:

In my opinion this is a great idea from Universal and Sony Music. Like David Joseph, the chief executive of Universal Music, said: “Wait is not a word in the vocabulary of the current generation. It’s out of date to think that you can build up demand for a song by playing it for several weeks on radio in advance.”. In reality now-a-days people don't want to wait for the product to come out when they could just pirate it for free, but now with this "on air, on sale" policy people wont have to wait for the song to come out for sale. They could just search for the song and buy it right there the moment they first hear it. This is a great solution that can help a lot with the anti-piracy war.

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Joseph Balado's curator insight, August 16, 2014 10:17 AM

This article was an article a few years ago, but is certainly relevant for today.  The article was published in 2011 and 3 yrs later the same concept they are fighting is still happening today. "Building up" an album or playing the music before it is released only encourages the pirates to copy and download it because of their impatience.  I guess the exception recently was the drop of Beyonce's new album which she released in a single night with no build up what so ever.  The building up still is prevalent today and I believe that it is a factor in the piracy game. 

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Freakonomics » How Much Do Music and Movie Piracy Really Hurt the U.S. Economy?

Freakonomics » How Much Do Music and Movie Piracy Really Hurt the U.S. Economy? | Pirated music | Scoop.it

Supporters of stronger intellectual property enforcement — such as those behind the proposed new Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and Protect IP Act (PIPA) bills in Congress — argue that online piracy is a huge problem, one which costs the U.S. economy between $200 and $250 billion per year, and is responsible for the loss of 750,000 American jobs.

These numbers seem truly dire: a $250 billion per year loss would be almost $800 for every man, woman, and child in America. And 750,000 jobs – that’s twice the number of those employed in the entire motion picture industry in 2010.

The good news is that the numbers are wrong — as this post by the Cato Institute’s Julian Sanchez explains. In 2010, the Government Accountability Office released a report noting that these figures “cannot be substantiated or traced back to an underlying data source or methodology,” which is polite government-speak for “these figures were made up out of thin air.”...

 

http://www.freakonomics.com/2012/01/12/how-much-do-music-and-movie-piracy-really-hurt-the-u-s-economy/


Via Christopher Coleman
Albert Lochard's insight:

I think that's it's really sad that people that pirate music have gotten to the level that they are at right now. From reading this article I found out that music and movie piracy is responsible for the loss of 750,000 American jobs. Not only that, but it also costs the U.S. economy between $200 and $250 billion per year. To me that is very unfair for the people that work very hard to put out their music or movies. These people don't work day and night just so people can get their projects for free, they are people just like you and I and they deserve the money that work for. 

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Steven Wang's curator insight, February 15, 2015 7:46 PM

This is an article regarding how piracy does not cause as much damage to the industry as some would have you believe. It is not siding with the individuals who engage in the act of illegally downloading music, but it is asserting that the figures that have been previously brought to attention are in no way factual. In the article, it states the Government Accountability Office released a report saying the figures previously released "cannot be substantiated or traced back to an underlying data source or methodology".

Rachel Crosley's curator insight, October 11, 2015 1:23 AM

This article was really interesting because it showed that music (and movie) piracy hurts the economy significantly less than previously thought. It also spoke on how even though it hurts the economy, it does't affect the job market at all. Music (and movie) piracy doesn't even count towards lost sales. Therefore, it can't really be seen as a bad thing in terms of affecting the economy. 

Jackson Willis's curator insight, April 24, 2016 9:57 PM

I added this article because it gives insite into the fiscal reprocussions to music piracy. It is very interesting how the losses caused by music piracy are not as black and white as one may think.

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Music publishers finally pull the trigger, sue an ISP over piracy | Joe Mullin | Ars Technica

Music publishers finally pull the trigger, sue an ISP over piracy | Joe Mullin | Ars Technica | Pirated music | Scoop.it

BMG Rights Management and Round Hill Music have sued Cox Communications for copyright infringement, arguing that the Internet service provider doesn't do enough to punish those who download music illegally.

Both BMG and Round Hill are clients of Rightscorp, a copyright enforcement agent whose business is based on threatening ISPs with a high-stakes lawsuit if they don't forward settlement notices to users that Rightscorp believes are "repeat infringers" of copyright.

There's little precedent for a lawsuit trying to hold an ISP responsible for users engaged in piracy. If a judge finds Cox liable for the actions of users on its network, it will have major implications for the company and the whole cable industry. It's one thing to terminate an account on YouTube, but cable subscribers can pay well over $100 per month—and BMG and Round Hill claim that they've notified Cox about 200,000 repeat infringers on its network.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Albert Lochard's insight:

This article is about BMG and Round Hill suing Cox Communications for copyright infringement. I can agree with BMG and Round Hill Music with the fact this Internet service provider doesn't do enough to punish those who download music illegally. By downloading music illegally you are stealing from the artist and the publisher and it s something that shouldn't be done at all.

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Davey B's curator insight, December 3, 2014 5:36 PM

This article seems to be credible for the most part except for the domain.

Justin Avant's curator insight, December 8, 2014 1:01 PM

I don't think ISP should be responsible for its customers illegal activities. ISP should be required to give names and information of the accounts of the IP address so each individual could be taken to court. 

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Music Industry Data: Sales Up, Piracy Down... But It's Not Because Of Any 'Anti-Piracy' Efforts | Techdirt

Music Industry Data: Sales Up, Piracy Down... But It's Not Because Of Any 'Anti-Piracy' Efforts | Techdirt | Pirated music | Scoop.it

A few folks have sent over variations on two different reports concerning the music industry, with some suggesting that this is "proof" that the recording industry's "war on piracy" has been effective on two fronts: increasing sales and reducing piracy. Of course, for many years, we've questioned whether or not reducing piracy actually increases sales, so we looked closely at the numbers and they don't seem to say what some people think they're saying. The Hollywood Reporter has a good summary of both reports. One comes from IFPI, celebrating that "global recorded music revenue" rose 0.3% in 2012. That is, obviously, a tiny increase, but it is an increase. Of course, as we've noted, "recorded" music revenue is merely one piece of the wider music industry ecosystem -- and that entire ecosystem has been growing for quite some time.

The second report comes from one of the industry's favorite researchers, NPD, claiming a massive decline in music file sharing (based on consumer surveys). I've found NPD's data to be suspect in the past, but let's just assume this is true. Then, can we reach the conclusion that the industry's anti-piracy efforts both worked and that it led to increased sales?

Actually... no. Not even close. We can see this pretty clearly just by looking beyond the recorded music market, to the wider file sharing space. Various reports have made it clear that widespread file sharing (mostly of infringing content) has continued to grow quite rapidly during the same time period. Sandvine reports (pdf) that BitTorrent traffic increased 40% over the same basic time frame. Or, zero in on a different market beyond music. How about software? The BSA's annual report continues to show increases in "piracy."

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Albert Lochard's insight:

This article is present you two examples on how music piracy is slowly decreasing. They mentioned  that global recorded music revenue rose 0.3% in 2012. In my opinion this is a very small percentage but at least it's going up, slowly but surely. I'm glad to see that the war against music piracy is actually working. 

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Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.'s curator insight, April 5, 2013 3:50 PM

*"Anti-Piracy Efforts" are no more than Culture Censorship and Pe@ple Control Tools.
- Don't Confuse (Pe@ple Nor 'Yourself')

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Music piracy on the decline as digital music sales grow | Wash Post

Music piracy on the decline as digital music sales grow | Wash Post | Pirated music | Scoop.it

Maybe music executives can finally stop singing the blues. Music piracy is on the decline, analysts say, while an industry group said digital music sales in 2012 drove global music industry revenues up for the first time since 1999.

 

It’s not a very big gain for the music industry — just 0.3 percent to $16.5 billion — but even that small uptick may be a sign that digital music has finally put the industry on the path to recovery. Digital music and services, the report said, grew 9 percent in the past year. That comprises digital downloads, as well as newer subscription services such as Spotify and ad-supported services including Pandora.

 

“No doubt, this is welcome news,” said Recording Industry Association of America spokesman Jonathan Lamy, who said over half of the industry’s revenues come from digital services now. “We are starting to turn the corner, and that’s great news for the business and fans.”

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Albert Lochard's insight:

Digital music is slowly killing music piracy. More people are preferring to listen to music through apps like Spotify and Pandora. Digital music and services grew 9 percent in the past year, according to reports. This is great news for people in the music industry and the fans that are willing to pay for music instead of using music piracy.

more...
Charles Bohart's curator insight, January 17, 2016 9:26 PM

In today's age, where the majority of my friends are pirating music the majority of the time, having a decline in piracy i welcome. Hopefully this minor uptick in legal digital downloads will snowball in the coming years and eradicate this problem.

JustTheBeginning's curator insight, February 9, 2016 10:08 PM

We're seeing times change not just over night but rapidly faster than usual with just about every big name company becoming a contender in the sweepstakes to providing the best music streaming services at the most convenient rate you gotta expect to see things get into tip top shape. Apps like Spotify, Apple Music, & etc are all in the ranks of running circles around the industry as a whole.

George Slight's curator insight, February 10, 2016 11:11 PM

This great news for the professional who is worried about sales. Until today I thought that music piracy was at an all time high, I'm glad to hear this news to prove me wrong and that the music field is thriving.