Pink Slime Time
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Pink Slime Time
Looking into the "pink slime" scare to better understand the newest food issue
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70 Percent of Ground Beef at Supermarkets Contains 'Pink Slime'

70 Percent of Ground Beef at Supermarkets Contains 'Pink Slime' | Pink Slime Time | Scoop.it

ABC reports the food phenomenon known as "pink slime", ammonia treated beef filler, after former USDA scientist and now whistle-blower Gerald Zirnstein reveals it being in 70% of ground beef. This is the first in a series of coverage done by ABC News that drew massive public attention to "pink slime", and gave a summary as to what lean finely textured beef (LFBT aka "pink slime") is and what the process is to produce the beef by-product. In the written report, the way "pink slime" is made "by gathering waste trimmings, simmering them at low heat so the fat separates easily from the muscle, and spinning the trimmings using a centrifuge to complete the separation...the mixture is sent through pipes where it is sprayed with ammonia gas to kill bacteria." The substance is then made into bricks and flash-frozen to be shipped to stores and meat packers to them be mixed in ground beef. I suggest you check out the link and then do some additional research (you can start with the links at the top, and go down from there) to become more knowledgeable on the subject of "pink slime".

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The Rise to Fame of 'Pink Slime' - Food Safety News

The Rise to Fame of 'Pink Slime' - Food Safety News | Pink Slime Time | Scoop.it

The "pink slime" debate has sparked political unrest in regards to food regulations and consumer awareness in regards to what is in their food. Political entities, like US Representative Steve King, who support the use of LFTB in foods without proper labeling, have "accused journalists and activists of perpetrating a 'smear campaign' against BPT", further suggesting that critics didn't have facts to back up their allegations. Journalists who covered the "pink slime" issue back in March, including ABC News senior correspondent Jim Avila, have stated that "they have nothing to hide, because their reporting stuck to the facts, and the facts themselves turned people away from BPI's signature fare." So is the fear over "pink slime" unfounded, or do critics have facts to back up their opposition to LFTB?

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York Common Cents | ‘Pink slime’ debate feels a little hostile

York Common Cents | ‘Pink slime’ debate feels a little hostile | Pink Slime Time | Scoop.it

Not everyone in the social media web is opposed to pink slime being present in the food we eat, as evidenced by this blogger's take on the situation. While Ashley Wislock is not an official news source, she does bring up the point that we have been eating this sort of food for many years now with no apparent consequence. Is it possible that this is issue is being blown out of proportion?

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Why I'm O.K. with 'Pink Slime' in Ground Beef

Why I'm O.K. with 'Pink Slime' in Ground Beef | Pink Slime Time | Scoop.it

Andrew Revkin of the New York Times is one of the first major media figures to take a positive stance on the pink slime debate. In his opinion page, Revkin attempts to address the fears surrounding this issue by bringing up facts regarding the consumption of beef in a meat-loving society. As he puts it, "I'd like those pushing the "yuck" factor to consider the extra 1.5 million or so head of livestock that will be need to be slaughtered to fill the ground beef gap." It appears there is more to appreciate about this admittedly gross concept than meets the eye.

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Social Media Has Real Beef with Pink Slime « Radian6 - Social media monitoring tools, social media engagement software and social CRM and marketing from the industry leader in social analytics.

Social Media Has Real Beef with Pink Slime « Radian6 - Social media monitoring tools, social media engagement software and social CRM and marketing from the industry leader in social analytics. | Pink Slime Time | Scoop.it

The social media has contributed quite a bit to the "pink slime" debate, allowing news of the beef by-product to spread quickly via news and social sites like twitter. The blog done by Jason Boies, states that social media "has largely been credited with playing a huge role in spreading the news about pink slime", and provides statistics regarding the discussion of this topic over the past several months. Key drivers to the social debate include McDonald's decision in January to discontinue its use of LFTB, celebrity tweets against the substance, and coverage done by official news companies like BBC News. This attention given to "pink slime" by social media seems to have had an effect on the issue, as "just eight days after the Twitter mentions began to surge it was announced that the USDA had decided to allow school districts to serve lunches without the controversial substance starting this fall." While it is an improvement, the lack of transparency over what is in our food is still a concern. Should products that utilize LFBT be labeled as such?

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Kroger, Stop & Shop join 'pink slime' exodus - The Denver Post

Kroger, Stop & Shop join 'pink slime' exodus - The Denver Post | Pink Slime Time | Scoop.it

"The Kroger Co., the nation's largest traditional grocer with 2,435 supermarkets in 31 states...said it will stop buying the beef, reversing itself after saying...that it would sell beef both with and without the additive." It would appear that consumers, who have a beef (bad pun) with "pink slime", or just the lack of labeling of the by-product, have caused another major food-provider to join other corporations, like Safeway, in not selling the product. As noted in a statement done by Kroger, their customers "have expressed their concerns that the use of lean finely textured beef-while fully approved by the USDA for safety and quality- is something they do not want in their ground beef." 

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Food Politics » The legacy of LFTB (a.k.a “pink slime”): power ...

Food Politics » The legacy of LFTB (a.k.a “pink slime”): power ... | Pink Slime Time | Scoop.it

It would appear that the recent controversy over "pink slime"/LFTB has brought up further political issues regarding the situation. With public relations in question, sides have developed in power politics. For instance, Representative Chellie Pingree, who submitted a bill in favor of the labeling of LFTB, has stated that "if a product contains connective tissue and beef scraps and has been treated with ammonia, you ought to be able to know that when you pick it up in the grocery store." Opposition to this is provided by Gov. Terry Branstad, who stated that the product was clearly safe and "bogus information" was being spread about LFTB. I would have to side with Pingree in regards to making it necessary practice to inform consumers about what is in their food. Do some research and decide whose side you're on, if either.

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Want A Little History With That Pink Slime? « Maureen Ogle

Want A Little History With That Pink Slime? « Maureen Ogle | Pink Slime Time | Scoop.it

There are many people who support the use of "pink slime" in their beef, and Maureen Ogle is one such person. In her blog she describes the history behind the product and the reasons as to how it came to be and why it is necessity in an over-indulging meat-loving society. As she points out, beef companies "began using it in the mid-seventies because, at the time, all meat prices, but especially beef, were in the stratosphere" and that the ammonia-gas treatment developed by Beef Products Inc. (BPI) was likely not of coincidence; at the time of the process's conception in the 1990's, "there was an outbreak of e-coli related illnesses (and a few deaths) caused by eating fast food burgers" caused by meat that had not been cooked at a high enough temperature. Ogle clearly believes that LFTB is beef and brings up many good arguments that support the pro "pink slime" side. Perhaps those opposed are not entirely informed, yet even if this information is true, does this allow beef producers the right to not inform consumers what is in their burger?

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Outcry over 'pink slime' hurting beef demand

Outcry over 'pink slime' hurting beef demand | Pink Slime Time | Scoop.it

The debate over LFTB (lean finely textured beef aka pink slime) and the fear of many consumers has had an effect on the selling of beef products. MSNBC reported that ground beef sales have declined over the "pink slime" controversy according to Jim Lochner, Chief Operating Officer of major meat processing company Tyson Foods. He stated that "the negative publicity...had an impact negatively on ground beef demand", yet claimed that it would recover quickly. Apparently he seems confident that the public will tire of this issue before negative PR will result in any modifications to the policies in place for "pink slime". Hopefully the steam pushing these changes in food policy won't subside just yet.

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Vitals - 'Pink slime' in your meat? Labels to tell you, USDA says

Vitals - 'Pink slime' in your meat? Labels to tell you, USDA says | Pink Slime Time | Scoop.it

The public outcry towards "pink slime" seems to have forced the hand of several meat producers to show whether or not their products have the filler in it. USDA spokesman Dirk Fillpot notes that "the agency has received voluntary requests from beef firms to change their labels to indicate it contains lean finely textured beef, or LFTB." This should be considered a victory for those who believe that they have a right to know as consumers what is in the food they eat. However, currently this sort of change is only voluntary, and Fillpot stated that "he couldn't discuss whether the agency was considering making it a requirement." Perhaps some more negative publicity will finally make the government choose to properly label the products that we eat, or at least let us know when we have LFTB/"pink slime" in our ground beef.

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