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Europe to Pump $26M into Plant Molecular Science Consortia - GenomeWeb

Europe to Pump $26M into Plant Molecular Science Consortia - GenomeWeb | pimmune | Scoop.it
Europe to Pump $26M into Plant Molecular Science ConsortiaGenomeWebAfter using a tape stripping method to remove the top layers of skin in an upper buttock area, researchers report seeing some skin microbiome variation related to host gender and...
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Comparative Analysis of Zinc Finger Proteins Involved in Plant Disease Resistance

Comparative Analysis of Zinc Finger Proteins Involved in Plant Disease Resistance | pimmune | Scoop.it

Via Elsa Ballini
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Exclusive: Fungal Wars of The World - The rejected Nature cover!

Exclusive: Fungal Wars of The World - The rejected Nature cover! | pimmune | Scoop.it

In exclusive, here is the now famous cover that was "rejected" by Nature - as narrated in the Science article "Attack of the Clones":

 

"When Nature recently accepted a review co-authored by Sarah Gurr, the plant pathologist from the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom sent the journal a self-produced image to consider for its cover. It shows a fungus looking like one of those colossal, menacing tripods from H. G. Wells's War of the Worlds, stalking through a field, with bats, frogs, and toads fleeing before it in a crazed panic. “Fungal Wars of the World,” Gurr called it. The picture didn't make it, but many scientists agree with its message: Fungi have now become a greater global threat to crops, forests, and wild animals than ever before..."

 

The cover was designed by Prof. Sarah Gurr and PhD student Sarah McCraw, University of Oxford. Check Sarah Gurr's website at http://dps.plants.ox.ac.uk/plants/staff/sarahgurr.aspx


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL, Mary Williams, Elsa Ballini
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Tom Nuhse's curator insight, September 2, 2013 12:11 PM

Emerging infectious diseases caused by fungi threaten bats, amphibia, potatoes, wheat, elms and ash trees. Chances are we haven't seen the half of it. See the original article here:

http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v484/n7393/full/nature10947.html

 

... and a summary here:

http://www.sciencemag.org/content/337/6095/636.full

 

but let's not forget that some fungi are our friends:

http://www.sciencemag.org/content/337/6101/1452.1.full