Physics 2010
7 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Orest Gogosha from Digital Presentations in Education
Scoop.it!

Split Image into Multiple Pieces to Create the Most Breathtaking Effect in PowerPoint

Split Image into Multiple Pieces to Create the Most Breathtaking Effect in PowerPoint | Physics 2010 | Scoop.it
This article will guide you step-by-step how to create the split image effect. Breaking an image into multiple pieces gives a unique visual look to design.

Via Baiba Svenca
Orest Gogosha's insight:

Cool! Here's a tutorial that will teach you how to improve your slides visually. Works with PowerPoint 2013.

more...
Debbie Pop's curator insight, April 4, 2016 2:50 PM

Cool! Here's a tutorial that will teach you how to improve your slides visually. Works with PowerPoint 2013.

Ricardo Serrano's curator insight, April 4, 2016 6:47 PM

Cool! Here's a tutorial that will teach you how to improve your slides visually. Works with PowerPoint 2013.

David Stapleton's curator insight, November 18, 2017 7:00 PM
Split Image Breathtaking and adventure in your visual design
Rescooped by Orest Gogosha from iPads, MakerEd and More in Education
Scoop.it!

The Hour of Code is here!

The Hour of Code is here! | Physics 2010 | Scoop.it
Anybody can host an Hour of Code anytime, but the grassroots campaign goal is for tens of millions of students to try an Hour of Code during December 7-13, in celebration of Computer Science Education Week. Is it one specific hour? No. You can do the Hour of Code anytime during this week. You're welcome to split up the Hour of Code into multiple sessions so long as your students finish the Hour of Code tutorial. Just do whatever works best for you and your students. (And if you can't do it during that week, do it the week before or after).

Via John Evans
Orest Gogosha's insight:

There are a lot of adults who would benefit from this.

 

more...
Gert Nilsson's curator insight, December 8, 2015 3:04 AM

Har ni inte anmält er klass till The Hour of Code, så är det hög tid nu!! #hourofcode #connectedlearning

Anmäl din klass här om du inte redan har gjort det: 

Scooped by Orest Gogosha
Scoop.it!

Describing Motion, Part 1 of 2, from Thinkwell's Video Physics 1 Course

http://www.thinkwell.com/student/product/calculus?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=info&utm_campaign=describing_motion Do you wish that Professor Pollock was yo...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Orest Gogosha from iPads, MakerEd and More in Education
Scoop.it!

Pixar and Khan Academy Release Free Online Course for Aspiring Animators | Make:

Pixar and Khan Academy Release Free Online Course for Aspiring Animators | Make: | Physics 2010 | Scoop.it
If you've ever wanted to know how the animators at Pixar do it, then you need to check out the Pixar in a Box classes from Khan Academy.

Via John Evans
more...
Fausto Cantu's curator insight, February 11, 2016 8:13 AM

Cursos gratis de Pixar?

Juan Jose Trujeque Garrido's curator insight, February 12, 2016 6:47 AM

Hello, I can enter the course to take? that paguina I can see well the requirements to enter the course.

Julie Wedgwood's curator insight, February 14, 2016 8:57 AM

Oh wow, I want to do this course!

Rescooped by Orest Gogosha from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

9 questions about Ukraine you were too embarrassed to ask

9 questions about Ukraine you were too embarrassed to ask | Physics 2010 | Scoop.it

Watch a video that explains Ukraine's crisis in two minutes or read this quick article that covers the same material.  

 

Ukrainians have been protesting since Nov. 21, when President Viktor Yanukovych rejected a deal for closer integration with the European Union, instead drawing the country closer to Russia. They are still in the streets in huge numbers and have seized regional government buildings in several parts of the country. In Kiev, the capital, clashes between protesters and security forces have become violent, killing several people. On Tuesday, the prime minister resigned. No one is quite sure what will happen next.

 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 15, 2014 5:50 PM

This article does a good job of explaining some of the many aspects of the current crisis in the Ukraine. While the media has been covering this conflict it has done little to provide background information on the Ukraine and precisely why Russia has invaded. This article goes into enough detail to flesh out the conflict without becoming in accessible to the average reader.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:58 PM

Ukrainians have been protesting since Nov. 21, when President Viktor Yanukovych rejected a deal for closer integration with the European Union, instead drawing the country closer to Russia. They are still in the streets in huge numbers and have seized regional government buildings in several parts of the country. In the capital, clashes between protesters and security forces have become violent, killing several people. Recently, the prime minister resigned. No one is quite sure what will happen next. What's happening in Ukraine is really important, but it can also be confusing and difficult to follow for outsiders who don't know the history that led up to. Here are some basic questions that have basic answers for people who are still confused. What is Ukraine? Why are so many people protesting? How did Ukraine get so divided? What role does Russia play and why do they care so much? Why haven't the United States or Europe helped? But most important, the question we all want to know the answer to is what is going to happen next?

Rachel Phillips's curator insight, May 7, 2015 3:01 PM

Such a helpful article, especially for people like me who don't like to look like an idiot.  This was so informative in a way that condensed the big issue into one short article that covered every aspect and made it easy to understand.  I knew there was something going on in Ukraine but didn't really know what it was, so this was awesome.  However, this is a real issue that people need to be aware of, especially when thinking, "well why doesn't the west just step in?" because that seems to be what we do everywhere else.  However, I think we've pretty much proven that stepping in can sometimes do more harm than good.  And honestly, it is not our problem to solve.

Scooped by Orest Gogosha
Scoop.it!

OpenStudy

OpenStudy | Physics 2010 | Scoop.it
Ask. Answer. Understand. Get real-time study help. Join the world's largest study group.
Orest Gogosha's insight:

http://openstudy.com/updates/5244a3bde4b0838bd4498f5b?version=feed:get-live-help&referrer=physics&domain=hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu

more...
No comment yet.