Physical Geography
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Physical Geography
Extreme Environments (Hot and Cold), Water, Rivers, Coasts, Oceans, Tectonics, Hazards, Ecosystems
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Aerial Photographs Catalogue the Life and Death of Volcanic Islands

Aerial Photographs Catalogue the Life and Death of Volcanic Islands | Physical Geography | Scoop.it

Volcanic islands can seem to appear out of nowhere, emerging from the ocean like breaching monsters of the deep. Below, Mika McKinnon explains how these odd geological formations are born, how they evolve, and how they eventually vanish back beneath the waves.


Via Seth Dixon
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Matthew Richmond's curator insight, December 2, 2015 3:30 PM

Re-scooped from Professor Dixon, pretty cool story on the formation of islands in the south Pacific. A couple of them look like the island visible from the beach in Rincon, Puerto Rico where I stayed. The island is one giant rock so nobody lives there and it's a naval base for the U.S. military. This, however, is a different situation when you realize that not only do people live here, but kind of a lot of people live here.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:00 PM

What causes the death and the caldera in a volcano? One thing that happens in a deceased volcano is the center of the volcano starts to either erode or the inside finally caves in. Once this happen a caldera takes shape and the ocean starts to take over. As the waves eat away at the shores it will eventually create a island that is shaped like a "U". After this happens that island will someday retreat back into the ocean and someday form a barrier reef.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:52 PM

Based on general knowledge, I know that the taller a volcano is, the younger it is and the shorter it is, the older it is. The reason they start to get short is from erosion. Hot spots in the Earth's crust make small islands from molten rock. Young islands can be very dangerous, because if they are inhabited, they have the possibility of erupting, whereas an old island does not since the volcano is lnactice and eroding. Over time the inactive volcano will crumble and a caldera will take shape and after even more time, that caldera will slip under the ocean and become a reef. 

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January 2014's extreme weather worldwide - interactive map

January 2014's extreme weather worldwide - interactive map | Physical Geography | Scoop.it
From temperatures as low as -36C in Russia to some of the wettest weather in the UK’s history, this map shows the extreme weather events of last month from around the world
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Helicopter journey along the Thames

Helicopter journey along the Thames | Physical Geography | Scoop.it
As flood relief efforts continue across the Thames Valley, the news helicopter took a trip along the river to see which areas were affected.
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Incredible High-Resolution Interactive Map of the World's Shrinking Forests - Wired Science

Incredible High-Resolution Interactive Map of the World's Shrinking Forests - Wired Science | Physical Geography | Scoop.it

"This beautiful data visualization tool gives the first comprehensive, high-resolution look at deforestation around the world. It is based on 654,178 Landsat satellite images from the U.S. Geological Survey that were analyzed by a team of academic, government and Google researchers."


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dilaycock's curator insight, November 17, 2013 10:02 PM

via Simon Lawry, Barker College

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Super typhoon Haiyan strikes Philippines, among strongest storms ever

Super typhoon Haiyan strikes Philippines, among strongest storms ever | Physical Geography | Scoop.it
Super typhoon Haiyan, thought to be the strongest storm to ever hit land, is carving a destructive path through the central Philippines.

Via Maree Whiteley
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Weather report: Wind could lift cars

Weather report: Wind could lift cars | Physical Geography | Scoop.it
BBC Weather's Carol Kirkwood reports that the storm is strong enough to lift cars and destroy buildings.
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Four die as storm hits southern UK

Four die as storm hits southern UK | Physical Geography | Scoop.it
Four people have died after a storm battered southern Britain, leading to 625,000 homes losing power, and rail and flight cancellations.
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Is there a link between extreme weather and climate change?

Is there a link between extreme weather and climate change? | Physical Geography | Scoop.it
“ This Q&A is part of the Guardian's Ultimate climate change FAQ • See all questions and answers • Read about the project Shifts in the number, severity and location of extreme weather events are among the most important impacts of climate change.”
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Infographic: What's Happening to Biodiversity?

Infographic: What's Happening to Biodiversity? | Physical Geography | Scoop.it
“ What's happening to biodiversity? We're losing it.”
Via Beth Dichter, dilaycock
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What if Americans Only Had as Much Water as Families in Africa?

What if Americans Only Had as Much Water as Families in Africa? | Physical Geography | Scoop.it
“ The average family in Africa gets by on only five gallons of water a day, according to this thought-provoking PSA video from bewaterwise.com, a project of the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California.”
Via Matthew Wahl
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Ethiopian dam's ecological and human fallout could echo Aral Sea disaster

Ethiopian dam's ecological and human fallout could echo Aral Sea disaster | Physical Geography | Scoop.it
Study suggests irrigation projects linked to Gibe III dam could devastate Lake Turkana's fisheries and affect livelihoods
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UK storms: Mapping the floods

UK storms: Mapping the floods | Physical Geography | Scoop.it
As parts of the UK is inundated by flood waters, maps highlight the impact of the latest severe weather.
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Flood defenders go back to nature to keep vulnerable homes dry

Flood defenders go back to nature to keep vulnerable homes dry | Physical Geography | Scoop.it
Experiments set up after floods of 2007 are exploring alternatives to costly concrete defences as funding dries up
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Is climate change to blame for Typhoon Haiyan?

Is climate change to blame for Typhoon Haiyan? | Physical Geography | Scoop.it
The Philippines has been hit by 24 typhoons in the past year but the power of Haiyan was off the scale, killing thousands and leaving millions homeless. Is there even worse devastation to come?
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Typhoon Haiyan Before & After - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Typhoon Haiyan Before & After - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) | Physical Geography | Scoop.it
View interactive before and after images showing the devastation Typhoon Haiyan has caused in Tacloban City, Philippines.
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Coastal retreat plan to curb floods

Coastal retreat plan to curb floods | Physical Geography | Scoop.it
The UK's largest ever coastal flood realignment sees a part of the West Sussex coast given back to the sea to increase protection.
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Climate change has silver lining for grizzlies

Climate change has silver lining for grizzlies | Physical Geography | Scoop.it
“October 28, 2013”
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Australian floods of 2010 and 2011 caused global sea level to drop

Australian floods of 2010 and 2011 caused global sea level to drop | Physical Geography | Scoop.it
“ Puzzled oceanographers who wondered where the sea level rise went for 18 months now have their answer – it went to Australia Rain - in effect, evaporated ocean - fell in such colossal quantities during the Australian floods in 2010 and 2011 that...”
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China flash floods kill 21 workers

China flash floods kill 21 workers | Physical Geography | Scoop.it
“ At least 21 construction workers are killed by flash flooding in a remote part of Qinghai province in north-west China, state media report.”
Via Haafizhah Azizul
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