Physical Geography
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Hunger Games: Map of Panem

Hunger Games: Map of Panem | Physical Geography | Scoop.it

As a former children's librarian, this is the perfect merger of some of my interests.  The Hunger Games, a Young Adult dystopian novel (movie coming soon) takes place in a post-WWIII North America with 13 districts noted for particular resources.  For example, district 4 specialized in fishing and district 12's economy centered on coal.  For middle schools that teach integrate units with social studies and English, this would be a very engaging, current connection. 


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picky's comment, March 21, 2012 5:40 PM
Phoenix, AZ, at 1100ft above present sea level, is shown underwater. Cincinnati, OH, at 900ft above present sea level, is shown still above water. This map makes no sense. Using a Panem map for teaching geology is a great idea, but don't use it to reinforce the false idea that "farther inland" means "higher."
Seth Dixon's comment, March 21, 2012 7:57 PM
Certainly this isn't a geologically accurate map (just like Waterworld was a fictitious world that couldn't exist). Yet in the book Hunger Games, there are elements of North American geography that are a part of this fictitious geography, even if it is not expected to be geographically accurate. Your point is most certainly well taken that further inland does not mean higher elevation.
Danielle Lip's curator insight, January 26, 2015 4:39 PM

This map of the Hunger Games location can help a young adult to make connections to the world we live in and with a movie/book that many children and adults adore. The districts all have different specialities and are spread out on a United States Map, I as a student would have the opportunity to see that where I live today would not be part of the districts post WWIII. This map could start a debate and discussion about English ( the book ) as well as Social Studies( the map) making connections to the world we live in today. Another way that this map can help children to learn is to place an actual map over the Panem map to help children become intrigued and see what could happen if there was a WWIII.

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Biomining: Bacteria 'mine' copper

Biomining: Bacteria 'mine' copper | Physical Geography | Scoop.it

"Say bacteria. People think infection. Or yogurts.

But in Chile, bacteria are being used to get at something this country heavily depends on: copper.

Chile is the world's biggest copper exporter, and has the planet's largest known reserves of the red metal.

The Atacama Desert, a desolate rocky plateau west of the Andes mountains, is dotted with copper mines.

Every now and then, a mining train passes through the arid landscape. Here and there the ruins of tiny towns still stand where miners used to live decades ago, their mud huts gradually falling to pieces under the baking sun.

Export of the metal is essential for Chile's economy - it amounts to about 70% of all Chilean exports - and the more copper the country digs out, the more money pours in.

The demand for the metal is continually increasing too; copper is used in most of our lives, from electrical wires and telephone lines to roofing materials, from nutritional supplements to jewellery.

This metallic element originated millions of years ago deep inside the Earth, and through geological processes finally came closer to the surface...."


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Cattle ranching: Biggest threat to Amazon Rainforest

Cattle ranching: Biggest threat to Amazon Rainforest | Physical Geography | Scoop.it
Cattle-ranching has been the key driver for deforestation in Brazil, responsible for 80 percent of the cleared lands.
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Glacial thinning has sharply accelerated at major South American icefields

Glacial thinning has sharply accelerated at major South American icefields | Physical Geography | Scoop.it
Washington DC (SPX) Sep 07, 2012 - For the past four decades scientists have monitored the ebbs and flows of the icefields in the southernmost stretch of South America's vast Andes Mountains, detecting an overall loss of ice as the c...

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World Environment News - Analysis - Lack of crop rotation slowly turns Argentine Pampas into "sand" - Planet Ark

World Environment News - Analysis - Lack of crop rotation slowly turns Argentine Pampas into "sand" - Planet Ark | Physical Geography | Scoop.it
Argentina's key resource, its agricultural soils, are being depleted by lack of crop rotation as soy farming encroaches on areas once used for corn, wheat and cattle grazing, according to local experts and a government source.

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Tunneling through Andes to speed global trade

Tunneling through Andes to speed global trade | Physical Geography | Scoop.it
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina (AP) — South American engineers are trying to tackle one of the continent's greatest natural challenges: the towering Andes mountain chain that creates a costly physical barrier for...

 

At the NCGE conference, noted author Harm De Blij mentioned a daring project that would link Eastern South America with the Pacific as engineers were planning to tunnel under the Andes mountains.  Here is a link to an article on this intermodal transportation project that would lower the shipping costs from East Asia to the Southern Atlantic.  Government officials in both Argentina and Brazil have described the  project as a matter of "national interest."  

 

Tags: transportation, LatinAmerica, globalization, industry, economic, development, unit 6 industry.


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Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 1, 2015 8:19 AM

If this project can be accomplished, it would truly be one of the greatest engineering feats in human history. To build a railroad tunnel through the Andes mountains seems impossible, but in all likelihood with the right amount of funding, it can be done. The tunnel would have great economic benefits for both Brazil and Argentina. Goods from both countries could be shipped in both directions with out any issues. The larger world would also benefit from the train tunnel. It is estimated that the tunnel would lower the shipping costs from East Asia to the Southern Atlantic. The entire global trading market would benefit from this development.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 7, 2015 12:44 PM
Doing something such as this is a brilliant move in engineering. Making a tunnel through the Andes will connect countries together, make shipping much easier and doing so may cut the cost of goods being shipped and received. Just like the Panama Canal increased the cargo freight lining industry for shipping, this will also increase an industry for railways,.
Matt Danielson's curator insight, September 29, 5:18 PM
This is a massive construction project, probably the largest and most expensive project undertaken in South America since the Panama Canal. This would be a joint venture between a few countries with construction mainly taking place in Argentina's Andes mountains. This would make trade far cheaper in South America by opening up a new passage through the mountains instead of over them(which are impassable in winter snows) or around the southern tip of the continent ( which is a much farther journey).  This would make the transportation and hence cost of goods drop drastically making them more widely available to the people. At the same time this would greatly open access to Asian markets and products. Overall it is my personal belief that this railway could help to bring prosperity to Suth America.