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STEM Education Article: Engineering students’ sustainability approaches

STEM Education Article: Engineering students’ sustainability approaches | Physics education | Scoop.it
European Journal of Engineering Education, Volume 0, Issue 0, Page 1-25, Ahead of Print.
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HowStuffWorks "How Gasoline Works"

HowStuffWorks "How Gasoline Works" | Physics education | Scoop.it
Without gasoline, the world as we know it would grind to a screeching halt. The U.S. alone consumes well over a hundred billion gallons of gasoline per year. Learn all about this vital fuel.
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UA Physics Department has 'phun' with annual show, showcases experiments - Arizona Daily Wildcat

UA Physics Department has 'phun' with annual show, showcases experiments - Arizona Daily Wildcat | Physics education | Scoop.it
UA Physics Department has 'phun' with annual show, showcases experiments Arizona Daily Wildcat The UA Physics Department's Physics Phun Night, held at the Physics and Atmospheric Sciences building in room 201, will feature physics experiments and...
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Brenda I Ramirez's curator insight, July 1, 3:46 PM
The UA physics department hold a way to engage students using a variety of physics demos. It allows students to gain interest in the subject and how the world works. This is a good resource and reminds me of the UTRGV society of physics students which also do something similar in the sense that they go around to different schools and engage the students with different demos.
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NASA's MAVEN mission blasts off to solve major Martian mystery

NASA's MAVEN mission blasts off to solve major Martian mystery | Physics education | Scoop.it
A rocket carrying NASA's MAVEN spacecraft blasted off from Cape Canaveral at 1:28 p.m. ET Monday, on a mission to answer a profound mystery about Mars' planetary evolution: What happened to the atmosphere?
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How Quantum Mechanics Can Be Derived From A Revolutionary New Theory Of Information

How Quantum Mechanics Can Be Derived From A Revolutionary New Theory Of Information | Physics education | Scoop.it
One of the great puzzles of quantum mechanics is that nobody quite understands what it means for reality to be quantum in nature. Information and computation form the bedrock of the reality, say physicists who have used this idea to derive quantum...

Via Thomas Faltin
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Astrophysicists Discover Black Hole in Globular Cluster Messier 62 | Astronomy | Sci-News.com

Astrophysicists Discover Black Hole in Globular Cluster Messier 62 | Astronomy | Sci-News.com | Physics education | Scoop.it
A team of researchers reported the first-ever discovery of a black hole (named M62-VLA1) in a globular star cluster in our Milky Way Galaxy.

Via David Simpson
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SSMS Science's curator insight, November 7, 2013 4:14 PM

A couple of years ago Dr. Tom Maccarone in Texas discovered a black hole in a globular cluster in a nearby galaxy. He found it using X-ray emmision from gases falling into the Black hole. This year in New Mexico they found another black hole. It was in a globular cluster too. This globular cluster Messier 62 is in the constellation Ophiuchus About 35,000 light years away. It measures 110 light years across and has about 1 million times the mass of the sun. This black hole is a so called stellar mass black hole, which means it is a collapse from a massive star. JD

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Quantum physics proves that there IS an afterlife, claims scientist - Daily Mail

Quantum physics proves that there IS an afterlife, claims scientist - Daily Mail | Physics education | Scoop.it
Daily Mail
Quantum physics proves that there IS an afterlife, claims scientist
Daily Mail
Most scientists would probably say that the concept of an afterlife is either nonsense, or at the very least unprovable.
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Outburst lights up Comet ISON; it's now visible to naked eye - NBC News.com

Outburst lights up Comet ISON; it's now visible to naked eye - NBC News.com | Physics education | Scoop.it
Get ready for a stellar show. The much-anticipated Comet ISON is now visible to the naked eye, according to reports from many observers.... (Comet ISON is getting brighter!!!!
This is exciting!!
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Why Tablets Are So Much Better Than Textbooks

Why Tablets Are So Much Better Than Textbooks | Physics education | Scoop.it
Click for sound.

;
//... (Why Tablets Are So Much Better Than Textbooks http://t.co/Avyqjp4ccO via @bi_university #edtech)
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27 Science Fictions That Became Science Facts in 2012

27 Science Fictions That Became Science Facts in 2012 | Physics education | Scoop.it
RT @egvick: of course a few @NASA things on the list ;^) 27 Science Fictions That Became Science Facts in 2012 http://t.co/w8wLZWE5p1 via @…
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Chuck Norris Really Hates These Education Standards

Chuck Norris Really Hates These Education Standards | Physics education | Scoop.it
Chuck Norris is apparently not a fan of the Common Core State Standards.
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European Robotics Coordination Action

European Robotics Coordination Action | Physics education | Scoop.it
@MiriamLeiros mira :-)) https://t.co/GZG4t7Z2bS … y http://t.co/AqSE2ugnxg
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Higher education reforms | The Gazette

Higher education reforms | The Gazette | Physics education | Scoop.it
HIgher education reforms: http://t.co/FgvBlqyGfK #WesternU #UWO #LdnOnt
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Stunning comet ISON photographed by amateur astronomer

Stunning comet ISON photographed by amateur astronomer | Physics education | Scoop.it
A spectacular set of photos taken by an amateur astrophotographer chronicles the evolution of Comet ISON over the last few months, which has seen the much-hyped icy wanderer brighten so much that it's now visible to the naked eye.
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Scientists Demonstrate Electromagnetic Invisibility Cloak | Physics | Sci-News.com

Scientists Demonstrate Electromagnetic Invisibility Cloak | Physics | Sci-News.com | Physics education | Scoop.it
Two researchers at the University of Toronto have created a new type of active invisibility cloak that can hide objects over a wide range of frequencies.

Via David Simpson
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Technology Trading: Scout Technologies & Technology Commercialization

Technology Trading: Scout Technologies & Technology Commercialization | Physics education | Scoop.it
TechScout.com is a leading Technology Scouting marketplace and Innovator community connecting Technology Scouts and Innovators from across the globe (Using #nanotechnology to provide targeted #cancer treatment: http://t.co/8iCNEQDeT3...
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The Inequality of Science | The Scientist Magazine®

FEATUREThe Inequality of Science
 












© JOELLE BOLT


In 2004, close to one in five extramural NIH dollars went to only 10 of the 3,000 institutions that received grants. Five US states get almost half of all funding.
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What's Wrong With Quantum Computing

What's Wrong With Quantum Computing | Physics education | Scoop.it

You've heard plenty of people by now—including us—banging on about quantum computers, and how they’re the future of high-performance computing. Quantum computing, we're meant to understand, is set to change the world. But despite its promise, it's neither widely available nor particularly useful yet. Here's why not.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2013

Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2013 | Physics education | Scoop.it
The night sky at its best - winning images of the Moon and beyond

Via planetMitch
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planetMitch's curator insight, September 19, 2013 3:31 PM

There are some amazing photos in this video! ENJOY!

Jack O'Dowd's curator insight, September 19, 2013 7:51 PM

Amazing...

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Could THIS Give Super Computers Big Boost?

Could THIS Give Super Computers Big Boost? | Physics education | Scoop.it
Quantum computers could crack codes and run more complex simulations than current machines, but actually building one is hard to do.
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Uncool quantum state survives for record 40 minutes - physics-math - 14 November 2013 - New Scientist

Uncool quantum state survives for record 40 minutes - physics-math - 14 November 2013 - New Scientist | Physics education | Scoop.it
Atoms that can survive in the fragile quantum state of superposition at room temperature could make quantum computers more practical (Uncool quantum state survives for record 40 minutes #science #news http://t.co/MoaQRaNs6i)...
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EDUCAUSE 2013 - The Connected Age

Connecting is a powerful metaphor for IT and higher education. Anyone and everything can be interconnected—people, resources, data, ideas. Linked and tagged,...
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Brenda I Ramirez's curator insight, July 1, 3:52 PM
This shows how we live in a world where everyone is connected in an online setting, we are living in a connected age. Where students are able to find a new app or technology that will allow them to learn well as well as network with one another. The possibilities with this technology is endless.
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Nasa mission to study Mars' lost atmosphere

Nasa mission to study Mars' lost atmosphere | Physics education | Scoop.it
Our science correspondent Pallab Ghosh assesses Nasa's latest mission to Mars, called Maven, which aims to find out how the planet became the barren world we know today. (RT @BBCNewsUS: How did #Mars become the Red Planet?
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Richard Feynman: The Eye of a Bee

Richard Feynman: The Eye of a Bee | Physics education | Scoop.it

The human eye is not the only kind of eye. In vertebrates, almost all eyes are essentially like the human eye. However, in lower animals there are many other kinds of eyes: eye spots, various eye cups, and other less sensitive things, which we have no time to discuss. But there is one other highly developed eye among the invertebrates, the compound eye of insects. Most insects having large compound eyes also have various additional simpler eyes as well. A bee is an insect whose vision has been studied in detail. It is easy to study the properties of the vision of bees because they are attracted to honey, and we can make experiments in which we identify the honey by putting it on blue paper or red paper, and see which one they come to. By this method some very interesting things have been discovered about the vision of the bee.

 

In the first place, in trying to measure how acutely bees could see the color difference between two pieces of “white” paper, some researchers found they were not very good, and others found they were fantastically good. Even if the two pieces of white paper were almost exactly the same, the bees could still tell the difference. The experimenters used zinc white for one piece of paper and lead white for the other, and although these look exactly the same to us, the bee could easily distinguish them, because they reflect a different amount in the ultraviolet. In this way it was discovered that the bee’s eye is sensitive over a wider range of the spectrum than is our own.

 

Our eye works from 7000 angstroms to 4000 angstroms, from red to violet, but the bee’s can see down to 3000 angstroms into the ultraviolet! This makes for a number of different interesting effects. In the first place, bees can distinguish between many flowers which to us look alike. Of course, we must realize that the colors of flowers are not designed for oureyes, but for the bee; they are signals to attract the bees to a specific flower. We all know that there are many “white” flowers.

 

Apparently white is not very interesting to the bees, because it turns out that all of the white flowers have different proportions of reflection in the ultraviolet; they do not reflect one hundred percent of the ultraviolet as would a true white. All the light is not coming back, the ultraviolet is missing, and that is a color, just as, for us, if the blue is missing, it comes out yellow. So, all the flowers are colored for the bees. However, we also know that red cannot be seen by bees. Thus we might expect that all red flowers should look black to the bee. Not so! A careful study of red flowers shows, first, that even with our own eye we can see that a great majority of red flowers have a bluish tinge because they are mainly reflecting an additional amount in the blue, which is the part that the bee sees. Furthermore, experiments also show that flowers vary in their reflection of the ultraviolet over different parts of the petals, and so on. So if we could see the flowers as bees see them they would be even more beautiful and varied!

 

It has been shown, however, that there are a few red flowers which do not reflect in the blue or in the ultraviolet, and would, therefore, appear black to the bee! This was of quite some concern to the people who worry about this matter, because black does not seem like an interesting color, since it is hard to tell from a dirty old shadow. It actually turned out that these flowers were not visited by bees, these are the flowers that are visited by hummingbirds, and hummingbirds can see the red!

Another interesting aspect of the vision of the bee is that bees can apparently tell the direction of the sun by looking at a patch of blue sky, without seeing the sun itself. We cannot easily do this. If we look out the window at the sky and see that it is blue, in which direction is the sun? The bee can tell, because the bee is quite sensitive to the polarization of light, and the scattered light of the sky is polarized. There is still some debate about how this sensitivity operates. Whether it is because the reflections of the light are different in different circumstances, or the bee’s eye is directly sensitive, is not yet known.

 

It is also said that the bee can notice flicker up to 200 oscillations per second, while we see it only up to 20. The motions of bees in the hives are very quick; the feet move and the wings vibrate, but it is very hard for us to see these motions with our eye. However, if we could see more rapidly we would be able to see the motion. It is probably very important to the bee that its eye has such a rapid response.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Best iPad Apps for College Students and Teachers

Best iPad Apps for College Students and Teachers | Physics education | Scoop.it
This blog post contains the list of best iPad apps for college students and teachers to make their educational activities more feasible.
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