Word, Phrase and Fable
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Word, Phrase and Fable
Things on the skewed side of the reference books
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Dr Chisholm Ogg's Guide for a Good Lawn

Dr Chisholm Ogg's Guide for a Good Lawn | Word, Phrase and Fable | Scoop.it

Doctor Chisholm Ogg's garden in Oxfordshire has been named Best of Britain in a national competition.

 

His tips for good greenkeeping:

 

Design-he goes for a long lawn which is easier to deal with.

 

Regular mowing, manicure (with scissors) and other maintenance tasks.

 

Doing these task even in the rain.

 

Well done, Dr Ogg.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Lucky Cigarettes? No Longer Possible in Australia.

Lucky Cigarettes? No Longer Possible in Australia. | Word, Phrase and Fable | Scoop.it

The removal of brand images from all cigarette packets in Australia means that such lore as lucky packets which contain pictures of sailors (like Players Navy Cut, but presumably it had rivals) will fall by the wayside. It seems that empty packets were even collected by children. It is considered doubly lucky to take the first cigarette out of the packet, turn it upside down and smoke it last.

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The Legends of the Kirk Grim.

The Legends of the Kirk Grim. | Word, Phrase and Fable | Scoop.it

A church grim or kirk grim are in legend the spirits of animals sacrificed on church grounds, usually when they were opened. Like the standard ghost they only stay in one location. They are usually dogs, but can be pigs, goats or lambs. They are noticable by the red eyes. The hellhound is different from the church grim by living on deserted roads. Cŵn Annwn are probably the nearest to grims in that they only haunt on holy days.

Some grim have been known to toll a death knoll at midnight, or peer from windows of the church.

There are other creatures associated with churches such as nixies who punish people who misbehave in church.

Most grims are a bad spirit or omen. There seems to be a link between grims and the grim reaper. The earlier version of the reaper was called fairy grim reaper.

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So Many People Believed Mermaid Hoax. Why?

So Many People Believed Mermaid Hoax. Why? | Word, Phrase and Fable | Scoop.it

Mermaids: The Body claimed that a body of a mermaid has been found. Despite the fact that fish and humans are so greatly removed in evolution terms, a number of watchers believed it to be true. Could it be that it's never been officially denied? Or maybe they want magical monsters to live in the sea?

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The Home Of Germany's Fairy Tale King

The Home Of Germany's Fairy Tale King | Word, Phrase and Fable | Scoop.it

Let's lift our steins to poor Ludwig, the original fairy tale king. And completely mad as well!

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Bible saved from scrap heap returned to California

Bible saved from scrap heap returned to California | Word, Phrase and Fable | Scoop.it

A Masonic Bible from the 1930s containing a California family's documents dating back to the 1870s was saved from the scrap heap by a Mosinee recycling company, but the story behind the Bible's journey might never be discovered. For centuries family Bibles were used to record children, their marriages, their grandchildren etc. throughout the world.

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Defining the Mobot - What it is and Where it come from

Defining the Mobot - What it is and Where it come from | Word, Phrase and Fable | Scoop.it

It seems it came from the Sky sport panel game A League of Their Own in May 2012. Claire Balding came up with which pose to do (they were trying to come up with something he could do when he won a medal), while James Cordon, the host came up with the name.

It has performed by such luminaries as Boris Johnson, Cheryl Cole and Usain Bolt.

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Lies, Lies and More Lies

Lies, Lies and More Lies | Word, Phrase and Fable | Scoop.it

Not last night but the night before three tom cats came knocking at the door.
I went downstairs to let him in and he me on the head with a rolling pin.

 

This piece of obvious lies, with “a blind man coming to see fair play” shows obvious lies and seems to put into rhyme what can also be found in various fairy tales of Grimm. In the Knoist and his Three Sons one son, blind, shot a hare; one son, lame; caught it, and one son, naked, put him in his pocket. The Tale of Schlauraffenland refers to a footless man who can outrun a quick horse. There is a tale called the Tale of Lying. “I saw a roast hen flying” and “I saw a millstone floating down the Rhine.”
There are obvious lies in nursery rhymes too like “the cow jumped over the moon” and “a crooked man walked a crooked mile” and "I met a man who wasn't there."
It continued in the nonsense rhymes of Edward Lear (“They went to sea in a sieve”) and Lewis Carroll (“The sun was shining...in the middle of the night.”)
Even now, people make obvious lies like “I went to the doctors because I had no bone in my arm”,“I sold my slippers to a man with no legs”, “We moved house on little wheels” “where the hand of man has never set foot” and so on. Sometimes it's just a turn of phrase, sometimes its for the sake of something to say.
This shouldn't be confused with telling an anecdote where the made up parts obscure the true parts, or even telling a joke or story, where you mean to make someone smile or give a moral.
But it is more likely for someone to be lying if they begin, “I say, I say, I say” or “An Englishman, Irishman and Scotsman” or “It turns out that now we have to...”
Even if they begin like this, sometimes people just lie. It's a way of life.

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Vampires are so passé, think Chupacabras,

Vampires are so passé, think Chupacabras, | Word, Phrase and Fable | Scoop.it

Chupacabras are people who enjoy drinking blood. It originates in Puerto Rico and other Latin American countries. 

It is named after a supposed creature with scaly skin and apparently hops around like a kangaroo-a cross between a dog and lizard. There are 'reports' of them attacking livestock.

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Tracking the most popular words in written English

Tracking the most popular words in written English | Word, Phrase and Fable | Scoop.it

The has retained its title as the most popular written word over the last five centuries, but the most popular phrases have changed dramatically. Less people write about the Pope and more people write about the United States is the gist, but things alter a lot.

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Latest Catchphrase: ‘Thelma and Louise Economics’

Latest Catchphrase: ‘Thelma and Louise Economics’ | Word, Phrase and Fable | Scoop.it

In America the term "Thelma and Louise Economics", i.e. to drive the economy off a cliff has been coined by the Conservatives.

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