Photography: View from a Window
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Photography: View from a Window
How has the camera been used by people? How do pictures reflect the social and intellectual culture of their time?
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Trump’s EPA Could Allow Teenage Workers To Handle Dangerous Pesticides

Trump’s EPA Could Allow Teenage Workers To Handle Dangerous Pesticides | Photography: View from a Window | Scoop.it
If the Environmental Protection Agency follows through with a reform now under consideration, teenage farmworkers and other working minors would once again be allowed to handle dangerous pesticides while on the job.

The EPA is now reevaluating a 2015 rule that tightened safety standards for farmworkers. In particular, the agency is considering changing or scrapping the requirement that anyone working with pesticides in agriculture be at least 18 years old.

Doctors had called for those restrictions to be put in place because pesticides can increase the risk of cancer or impact brain development in children.

The EPA may also tweak or do away with the age requirements of another recent rule, which spells out who can be certified to be an applicator of the chemicals that the EPA classifies as the most toxic. That could make it legal for minors to work with what are known as “restricted-use” pesticides, like arsenic and methyl bromide, in a host of industries beyond just agriculture, such as landscaping and pest control.

Restricted-use pesticides are not sold to the public for general use because of how dangerous they can be to people and the environment.
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Perspective | Photographers edit photographers: Nina Berman’s ‘frighteningly intelligent’ imagery

Perspective | Photographers edit photographers: Nina Berman’s ‘frighteningly intelligent’ imagery | Photography: View from a Window | Scoop.it
Nina Berman’s work always floors me — her mix of raw politics, poetic twists, and human despair. The fact that this fracking series began in 2010 and is still frighteningly relevant speaks to the intuitive approach she takes. Nina is frighteningly intelligent — and every work she undertakes is flawlessly researched and prescient.  She was already exploring this environmental, corporate exploitation before it even registered in the mainstream media.

What I love about Nina’s work is while she focuses on political and social injustice — and those humans that are often the victims of it — she ascribes agency in how she represents them. Whether in her past work of wounded U.S. soldiers or victims of racism. This particular story unfolds like a Greek tragedy, and she smartly structured it along the lines of a play — the characters are stoic, actively resisting forces you cannot always tangibly access but sense in the eerie disruption of nature, sparks of orange looming in the distance and tired mothers nursing collapsed daughters. A weariness and wariness, and natural order askew. This work made me uncomfortable, this work made a far away headline relevant. This work — as awful as the subject is — is beautiful for its resisting humanity.
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‘I knew more than enough to be utterly repelled by conflict, yet I was undeniably drawn to it’

‘I knew more than enough to be utterly repelled by conflict, yet I was undeniably drawn to it’ | Photography: View from a Window | Scoop.it
Magnum Photos photographer Peter van Agtmael's new book crisscrosses the United States, providing a snapshot of the state of the country
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Sir Elton John’s Modernist Photography Collection – A Home Tour

"Sir Elton John introduces us to his passion for collecting and his Modernist Photography collection which he lives with, in a home tour.

Made up of over 70 artists and nearly 150 rare vintage prints on show from seminal figures including Brassai, Imogen Cunningham, André Kertész, Dorothea Lange, Tina Modotti, and Aleksandr Rodchenko, The Radical Eye collection presents an unrivalled selection of classic modernist images from the 1920s to the 1950s – a crucial moment in the history of photography."


More on The Radical Eye here: http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/radical-eye-modernist-photography-sir-elton-john-collection

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Incredible pictures taken by growing army of female war photographers

Incredible pictures taken by growing army of female war photographers | Photography: View from a Window | Scoop.it
A growing number of female photographers are putting themselves on the front line of conflicts across the world, to capture harrowing images which, at times, their male counterparts can't.
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Harold Feinstein’s work to be featured at Sweethaven Gallery

Harold Feinstein’s work to be featured at Sweethaven Gallery | Photography: View from a Window | Scoop.it

Harold Feinstein began his career in photography in 1946 at the age of 15 and within four short years, Edward Steichen, an early supporter, had purchased his work for the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art. He joined the Photo League at 17 and became a prominent figure in the vanguard of the early New York City street photography scene where he exhibited at Helen Gee’s Limelight Gallery.


When he passed away in June 2015, the New York Times declared him “one of the most accomplished recorders of the American experience.” The Boston Globe said: “He saw more than most. Though critics began applying the phrase ‘master photographer’ to Mr. Feinstein when he was only in his 20s, he might have argued that his true mastery lay in his approach to life, as expressed through the camera in his hands.”


In her renowned photography blog, Elin Spring commented: “Feinstein had a genius for guiding us to the beauty in others in the same gifted way that Diane Arbus made us aware of their flaws or Garry Winogrand conveyed satire. To me, Feinstein’s great legacy will be his generous and touching reflection of our best selves.” His work is owned by museums worldwide including The Museum of Modern Art, The International Center for Photography, The George Eastman House, The Museum of the City of New York and over two dozen others.

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USA National Award - 2016 Sony World Photography Awards

USA National Award - 2016 Sony World Photography Awards | Photography: View from a Window | Scoop.it

"We are proud to announce the winners and runners-ups of the 2016 National Awards. Browse the gallery below or click on an individual country to see the winners. [For more countries' photographs: http://goo.gl/A7F3QB]


About the National Awards 


Now in its 4th year, the hugely successful National Award programme works across 61 countries, from Australia to Argentina, Russia to Vietnam, and is unique in its scope and reach. For this year’s competition, an expert panel was tasked to uncover and honour the best single image taken by a photographer from each National Award country, entered into any of the ten Open categories of the 2016 Sony World Photography Awards." 



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Review: The Painter Ellsworth Kelly’s Love Affair With Photography

Review: The Painter Ellsworth Kelly’s Love Affair With Photography | Photography: View from a Window | Scoop.it
In 1862, Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres led a group of French artists and intellectuals in a campaign against photography, signing an official petition denouncing the “industrial” method as anathema to the artist.

A century later, the art world still looked down its nose at the medium. Yet the camera, with the ability to render the actual world in precise optical detail, has been a secret weapon for artists since photography’s inception, from Thomas Eakins to Edgar Degas, Charles Sheeler, Robert Rauschenberg and Andy Warhol.

Ellsworth Kelly, who died in December, first picked up a camera in 1950 and began making pictures as “records of my vision, how I see things,” he told an interviewer in 1991. Now, the first exhibition of Mr. Kelly’s photographs is at the Matthew Marks gallery, more than 30 gelatin silver prints made over four decades. His straightforward pictures of houses, barns, brick walls and winter branches yield the same distinctive observation of perceptual phenomena so characteristic of his hard-edge paintings, sculpture and prints: Rectangles float; shadows fall into hard-edge shapes; surfaces reveal evenly mottled patterns and unlikely grids.
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Strange and Familiar: Britain as revealed by foreign photographers since 1930

Strange and Familiar: Britain as revealed by foreign photographers since 1930 | Photography: View from a Window | Scoop.it
"A new exhibition at London's Barbican explores life in Britain as seen through the eyes of international photographers, capturing its changing social, cultural and political identity since the 1930s. • Curated by iconic British photographer Martin Parr, Strange and Familiar: Britain as Revealed by International Photographers includes everything from social documentary and street photography, to portraiture and architectural photography by some of the leading lights of 20th and 21st century photography. • Each of the featured photographers record different characteristics of life around Britain in their own distinctive style. Starting in the mid-1930s with Edith Tudor-Hart’s images of London’s East End to the slum housing areas of Tyneside that capture the child welfare, unemployment and homelessness that characterised the interwar years. Henri Cartier-Bresson’s pictures capture the celebratory spirit at the Coronation of King George VI in 1937 – photographing the crowds lining the streets. The work of Gian Butturini and Frank Habicht show the euphoria of the Swinging Sixties and the anti-War movement, while Robert Frank’s portrayal of life in London alongside the coal mining towns of South Wales in the early 1950s charts the rise of a British corporate culture and brings into sharp relief the relationship between wealth and poverty."
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New York Photographer Jonathan Higbee Speaks Out About Street Photography

New York Photographer Jonathan Higbee Speaks Out About Street Photography | Photography: View from a Window | Scoop.it
Michael: Jonathan, this photo, which you took in Times Square this summer, has generated a lot of chatter about whether or not it was staged. This, despite the fact that you have repeatedly stated that it is not a staged photo. Why do you think people have such a difficult time accepting this fact?

Jonathan: Well, it looks different than a lot of the street photography that inundates people's photography feeds these days. It's not the kind of front-on street portrait in the style of Bruce Gilden that has become synonymous with street photography in the smartphone era; it is obviously an extraordinary scene, so it's difficult for some to understand that this unimaginable moment really -- serendipitously -- and organically unfolded before me.

Although I think art should be free of rules, some people have a hard time accepting my photo because they're determined to enforce "rules" of street photography. One of the cardinal sins, according to them, is to stage a photo. That street is "not supposed to be" posed or directed. It's "supposed to be" an authentic documentation of reality. My shot plays with reality, so it's an easy target for folks concerned with this kind of regulation. I'm thrilled that I've made such a controversial image that gets people talking. The fact that some people swear it's staged is a compliment, really.

But, ultimately, what difference does it make if a photo is posed or candid? Isn't the final product -- the picture, the story, the feeling it provokes -- all that matters? Do people reject songs that aren't inspired by reality but instead imagined by the songwriter? I'm not talking about documentary photography or reportage -- that obviously, by definition, shouldn't be staged. But street?
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The new storytellers: Josh Robenstone

The new storytellers: Josh Robenstone | Photography: View from a Window | Scoop.it
"'Mostly, I like to photograph people, or at least where people have been and what people have done to places that now may be without people in them. The absence of people, but not in a natural sense. I love nature and spending time in it but to photograph it doesn't interest me. It's humans and and the question of their place on this earth that I find intriguing. This can be very broad and manifest in many ways but at the end of the day the themes of society and humans are quite consistent. • My recent project, BASTA! looks at this closely. Photographed during a hot Italian summer, the work is an anthropological study disguised as some sort of a travel document. I like the idea of hidden themes and symbolisms. Sometimes to the point that I feel they may be so hidden I'm not sure anyone will actually see them!'"
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Israel And The West Bank Through Fresh Eyes

Israel And The West Bank Through Fresh Eyes | Photography: View from a Window | Scoop.it
A dozen internationally acclaimed photographers were set loose in Israel and the West Bank. Most had never been in either place before. The aim was to try to see anew a part of the world that's been thoroughly photographed, long mythologized and often fought over.

The project's creator is Frederic Brenner, a French photographer perhaps best known for his documentation of the global Jewish diaspora. And the result is "This Place," a photo exhibit now showing in Tel Aviv and coming to the U.S. later this year.

As the project started, Brenner found himself in a scene he'd shot before – a Hasidic Jewish family sitting down to a Sabbath meal.
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The Man Who Saw America

The Man Who Saw America | Photography: View from a Window | Scoop.it
"Last May, Robert Frank, the world’s pre-eminent living photographer, returned to Zurich, the orderly Swiss banking city, cosseted by lake and mountain, where he grew up. When an artist who made his reputation by leaving returns home, mixed feelings are inevitable, and that was especially true for Frank, whose iconic American pictures are notable for their deep understanding of human complication. ‘‘I know this town, but I certainly feel like a stranger here,’’ he said. • As he walked through the immaculate Zurich city center, with its many statues, gilded shop signs and fountains, Frank was ‘‘just amazed how well organized everything is, how perfect everything is.’’ The Swiss, he explained, do not throw coins into fountains, because ‘‘they have everything they need. They don’t believe in wishing wells. Only the poor have to hope.’’ Deciding he wanted to ride a streetcar, Frank surveyed the different lines. ‘‘I usually don’t get a ticket on the tram,’’ he explained. ‘‘This town is rich enough.’’ He said he never worried about being caught by inspectors, and he didn’t seem worried. He seemed the way he typically did — fully present and yet filled with personal mystery. ‘‘I don’t know where that one goes, so we’ll take it,’’ he said, and was soon bound for a working-class district of the city. • Frank has always been a picture-maker unconcerned with his own appearance, and sitting quietly beside the streetcar window, he wore the usual faded work shirt, frayed pants and one too many mornings of stubble. A sturdy man who never uses socks, a winter hat or gloves, Frank is now 90, and in the cool Swiss air, he had on a new blue down coat. His melancholy eyes rarely betray anything, but as he gazed out at the city of his youth, there was the sense of a man wary, defended, skeptical, yet willing to be engaged. In his pocket he carried an Olympus camera."
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Inside One of America’s Last Pencil Factories

Inside One of America’s Last Pencil Factories | Photography: View from a Window | Scoop.it

"A pencil is a little wonder-wand: a stick of wood that traces the tiniest motions of your hand as it moves across a surface. I am using one now, making weird little loops and slashes to write these words. As a tool, it is admirably sensitive. The lines it makes can be fat or thin, screams or whispers, blocks of concrete or blades of grass, all depending on changes of pressure so subtle that we would hardly notice them in any other context. (The difference in force between a bold line and nothing at all would hardly tip a domino.) And while a pencil is sophisticated enough to track every gradation of the human hand, it is also simple enough for a toddler to use.

Such radical simplicity is surprisingly complicated to produce. Since 1889, the General Pencil Company has been converting huge quantities of raw materials (wax, paint, cedar planks, graphite) into products you can find, neatly boxed and labeled, in art and office-supply stores across the nation: watercolor pencils, editing pencils, sticks of charcoal, pastel chalks. Even as other factories have chased higher profit margins overseas, General Pencil has stayed put, cranking out thousands upon thousands of writing instruments in the middle of Jersey City."

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Annie Leibovitz’s Work on ‘Women’ Is Never Done

Annie Leibovitz’s Work on ‘Women’ Is Never Done | Photography: View from a Window | Scoop.it
"On a recent morning at her photography studio in Chelsea, Annie Leibovitz was affectionately discussing with her longtime friend Gloria Steinem a photo shoot they did together. • The statuesque Ms. Leibovitz, her long white hair flowing down her black button-down shirt, recalled pointing to Ms. Steinem’s messy desk in the corner of her home last year and saying, “That’s your cockpit.” • “I think it’s important for a young student or writer to see you at work,” Ms. Leibovitz had told her. • In the finished portrait, now tacked to the wall, Ms. Steinem, the 82-year-old political activist and women’s advocate, is captured lost in thought — or concern — at her computer, surrounded by books and paper, and bathed in the glow of her desk lamp. “It is, of course, the place that means the most to me,” Ms. Steinem said, “because it’s where I write — and where I’m unable to write.” • The intimate picture of Ms. Steinem was the first of dozens of new images of female leaders — in politics, sports, business and culture — that Ms. Leibovitz, 67, began taking last year to update her 1999 project “Women,” a book collaboration with her partner of 15 years, Susan Sontag, who died in 2004. “It really resonated,” Ms. Leibovitz said, but “the project was never done.”"
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20 haunting portraits of child laborers in 1900s America

20 haunting portraits of child laborers in 1900s America | Photography: View from a Window | Scoop.it
An exploration of some of the work Lewis Hine did documenting child labor in the United States.
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The Voyages Issue: Remarkable Journeys With Six Photographers

The Voyages Issue: Remarkable Journeys With Six Photographers | Photography: View from a Window | Scoop.it
Photo essays from around the world by Andrea Frazzetta, Joachim Ladefoged, David Maurice Smith, Kirsten Luce, Sebastián Liste and Raymond Meeks.
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#FixCopyright: Copy explains 'Freedom of Panorama'

The European Commission is consulting on 'Freedom of Panorama' until 15 June 2016. Want to know more, check http://youcanfixcopyright.eu

This is a one-time opportunity to end the fact that copyright applies to images or drawings of buildings or monuments that are part of our panorama.

This Commission tries to collect input on the ‘panorama exception’, or as the EC puts it the “use of works, such as works of architecture or sculpture, made to be located permanently in public places”. In plain English, it’s all about the use of images of public space in a personal or commercial context. To clarify the latter, you need to see ‘commercial’ as a broad concept, when you think of the fact that Wikimedia is considered a commercial outlet or when posting on a blog or social media platform that includes advertising could be interpreted as commercial. The issue here is that there is an un-harmonised exception in the EU copyright legislation.
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Leading Japanese photographer Daisuke Yokota wins Foam Paul Huf Award 2016

Leading Japanese photographer Daisuke Yokota wins Foam Paul Huf Award 2016 | Photography: View from a Window | Scoop.it
Japanese photographer Daisuke Yokota, one of the rising stars of the international photography scene, and the leading name in a new generation of Japanese artists, has been chosen as the winner of the tenth Foam Paul Huf Award. 

Daisuke Yokota, 32, from Saitama, north of Tokyo, in Japan, has a long, meticulous and demanding approach to photography, the kind of work only an obsessive would embark on.

Yokota, who is represented by Japanese gallery G/P, is at the vanguard of a new movement of Japanese experimental photographers.

He shoots on a compact digital camera, before printing and rephotographing the images on medium-format film. He then prints and reprints, again and again, but this time using heat and light, or applying acid or naked flames to the end results. In the process, the images become distorted, warped, otherworldly.
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Exhibition - Ellsworth Kelly - Works in Exhibition - Matthew Marks Gallery

Exhibition - Ellsworth Kelly - Works in Exhibition - Matthew Marks Gallery | Photography: View from a Window | Scoop.it
Exhibition page for Ellsworth Kelly showing at Matthew Marks Gallery. Includes Press Release, Works in Exhibition, Press, Books, Posters, and associated Artists.
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The National Park Service Is Currently Offering a Potential Photography Dream Job

The National Park Service Is Currently Offering a Potential Photography Dream Job | Photography: View from a Window | Scoop.it
Here’s the job description from the listing:
“Produces large-format photographic documentation to the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for the HABS/HAER/HALS permanent collection at the Library of Congress. Develops photographic guidelines and standards for traditional and born-digital photographic processes and products.  Produces exhibition quality prints for exhibition, publication, or other visual purposes.  Evaluates submissions and provides advice and assistance concerning production of photographic documentation for donations to the collection or for mitigation purposes.  Makes presentations about the collection or the programs to various public and private groups.”
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The Men of the Vale

The Men of the Vale | Photography: View from a Window | Scoop.it
I FIRST became aware of the Vale of Cashmere in Prospect Park one summer evening in 1976, when a dear friend of mine, Carl, asked me for a lift. He said he was meeting someone, and I ended up dropping him off on a quiet stretch of Flatbush Avenue halfway between Grand Army Plaza and the zoo, where he entered the park through a hole cut in the fence. I came to learn that it wasn’t the first or last time he would go through that fence, and I later got to know some of the men he met on the other side.

I again stumbled upon the Vale in the spring of 2001. Late one afternoon while my son was at baseball practice in the Parade Grounds, I crossed Parkside Avenue to take a walk in the park. I found myself wandering down a lane that led to a sunken, overgrown fountain. I thought I knew every inch of the park, but suddenly I was in a place I’d never seen before: a secret garden crisscrossed with a maze of hidden paths and roadways. Not until I followed a dirt trail to the top of a ridge and saw the fence below me, with the hole still in it, did I realize where I was. Ten years had passed since Carl had died. I sat on a bench trying to take it all in, and decided to take photographs there in his memory.

After a few false starts, I committed to working between late afternoon and sunset three or four days a week, walking the paths with my medium-format camera mounted on a tripod. I photographed the landscape between 2008 and 2011 and introduced myself to the men I encountered. I’d ask them if I could make a portrait for a possible book, explaining that the long exposure I had to use, between 1 and 6 seconds, meant they’d have to stay very still. Many declined, but many said yes, and I was grateful every time they did.
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Atlanta to repeal photography ordinance deemed unconstitutional

Atlanta to repeal photography ordinance deemed unconstitutional | Photography: View from a Window | Scoop.it
"Mickey Osterreicher, General Counsel for the National Press Photographers Association: 'Streets, sidewalks and public parks are ‘traditional public spaces in which ‘the rights of the state to limit the exercise of First Amendment activity are sharply circumscribed,’' it read in part. 'Photography is strictly protected by the Constitution as (in this case) both an expressive form of speech and for newsgathering. Nationwide, photographers are increasingly subject to harassment by police officers, who, under color of law, cite privacy, safety and security concerns as a pretext to chill free speech and expression or to impede the ability to gather news. The NPPA is concerned that this ordinance has provided the police with unbridled discretion to abridge the rights of photographers covering matters of public concern.'"
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This Place

This Place | Photography: View from a Window | Scoop.it

THIS PLACE explores the complexity of Israel and the West Bank, as place and metaphor, through the eyes of twelve internationally acclaimed photographers.

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