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Brick Lane Street | Photographer: Serge Bouvet

Brick Lane Street | Photographer: Serge Bouvet | Photography | Scoop.it

Brick Lane is a street in East London, England, in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. It runs from Swanfield Street in the northern part of Bethnal Green, crosses Bethnal Green Road, passes through Spitalfields and is linked to Whitechapel High Street to the south by the short stretch of Osborn Street. Today, it is the heart of the city's Bangladeshi-Sylheti community and is known to some as Banglatown. It is famous for its many curry houses and the graffiti's artists. The French photographer Serge Bouvet stayed 3 hours in this street to shoot the lovely pedestrians.

 


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Martin Roemers Photographer

Martin Roemers Photographer | Photography | Scoop.it

There are now 7 billion people on earth, and according the United Nations Population Fund, one half of us live in cities. Martin Roemers has been photographing the world’s megacities, sprawling urban areas inhabited by millions, capturing their chaos, humanity and dynamism. “Metropolis,” Roemers’ first North American exhibition, opens February 29 at Anastasia Photo, a New York City gallery specializing in documentary photography and photojournalism. The show runs through April 1.


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Jean-Marie Grange's curator insight, September 25, 2013 10:54 AM

A good way to show action and movement in crowded cities.

I'll have to try that with my new tripod!

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Street photography around the world | Photographer: Maciej Dakowicz

Street photography around the world | Photographer: Maciej Dakowicz | Photography | Scoop.it

"Most people say that street photography features people photographed on the street in unposed situations. For me this definition is simply too broad as it includes portraiture, reportage and peopled cityscape, which might have nothing to do with the genre. For me this broad definition can be narrowed easily to define proper street photography by adding just one word – “a twist”. A little twist – something clever, funny, unexpected, surprising or ambiguous. Something making you scratch your head, something putting a smile on your face… And the photo does not have to be taken on the street – it can be shot indoors, on the beach or in the forest. What matters is that little “twist”.
 
What are the key elements of a good photo? In my opinion it is the content, composition and light. The content is most important for me. Sometimes a poorly composed and lit photograph still can be good, what matters is the message it conveys. The composition is the way elements are placed and related to each other in the frame. It greatly depends on the distance from the subject – usually the closer you get the more dynamic perspectives you can achieve that can make your compositions more interesting.

 

The light is what illuminates the scene and produces shadows and highglights in the image. It can be natural or artificial. It can be a direct sunlight (which can be soft or harsh depending on the time of the day), soft ambient light in the shade or flash produced by the flashgun on top of the camera. When these three elements come together nicely in one frame you most probably have a great photo."- Maciej Sakowicz


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Jean-Marie Grange's curator insight, October 23, 2013 11:53 AM

Another very good set of street photography

Martin Lea's curator insight, November 10, 2013 7:17 AM

that is it..........a moment or a thought or a caption ..............you just see it ior sense but of course you have to capture it !!

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Portraitlandia | Photographer: Kirk Crippens

Portraitlandia | Photographer: Kirk Crippens | Photography | Scoop.it

When Kirk Crippens went on a five-week residency at Newspace Center for Photography in Portland, Ore., he welcomed the opportunity to shift gears a bit. The residency allowed him to work without distraction from life’s daily grind, and he was able to take a break from his long-term project about the recession toward something more whimsical. The result was a portrait-based series, “Portraitlandia,” in which he turned his camera on the people of Portland.

 

Although he was only in Portland for about a month, Crippens spent close to a year preparing for the residency, acting a bit like a tourist and scouting out possible portrait subjects through word of mouth. He decided to follow his subjects’ lead regarding locations for the shoot, and he asked them also to give him two hours of their time to create the portrait—an unusually long commitment for Crippens. “I wanted to do something that had authenticity while being aware I was new to Portland and didn’t have the time to build the relationships I would normally have,” he said.

 

Crippens also decided to work outside of his comfort zone and shot the entire series with a 4-by-5 view camera using film. It was the first time for him using the camera, and he practiced using it before heading to Portland. He said it allowed him to slow down his process, and it broke the ice a bit with his subjects who were curious about the camera. “Working in a slow, analog medium really leant itself to having an opportunity to get to know the folks,” he said. “It gave an expansiveness to their sessions.”


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Thames & Hudson Publishers | Essential illustrated art books | Sergio Larrain

Thames & Hudson Publishers | Essential illustrated art books | Sergio Larrain | Photography | Scoop.it
The first complete monograph of Chilean photographer Sergio Larrain's work ever published, with more than 200 photographs, letters, drawings and handwritten texts that reflect his compassionate vision of the world...
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Tiksi | Photographer: Evgenia Arbugaeva

Tiksi | Photographer: Evgenia Arbugaeva | Photography | Scoop.it

Once upon a time in Siberia, on the shores of the Arctic Ocean, in a warm bed in a small town, a little girl woke up from a dream. It was morning, but it was still dark out, for the little town was so far North that the sun would not show itself for many months. They called this the Polar Night.

The little girl rubbed the sleep from her eyes and dressed in the dark. She put on her pink jacket and red stocking cap and stepped outside. Her breath froze and she walked in the direction of school. All around her were endless fields of frozen tundra. But the fields were not white like you might think, for up above the Aurora Borealis lit up the sky. It looked like a big green breath frozen in the heavens and all around the little girl were beautiful colors. The snow was painted green. And on some mornings—if she was lucky—she’d even see bits of blue, yellow and pink on her walk to school.

She loved these colors very much. Walking through them made her imagination come alive. She liked to think of the fields as blank canvases for Mother Nature to paint upon. And what did that make her? Was she part of the painting too, in her pink jacket and red hat?

She smiled and her mind began dreaming of the days when the Polar Night would come to an end, when the first sun would light up the snowy mountains, making it look like blueberry ice cream. And then the summer would come, the snow would melt and the tundra would transform into planet Mars with it’s golden color seeming to stretch out forever in every direction.

She thought to herself, “Every season has its own colors.” She stored all these colors in her heart, and walked beneath the Aurora Borealis in this little town way up North.

The town was called Tiksi. - 

 


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Photo report's curator insight, November 18, 2013 9:24 AM

Evgenia Arbugaeva is one of 50 photographers in the Critical Mass 2011 exhibition Contents: Love, Anxiety, Happiness & Everything Else atPhoto Center NW. This exhibition, juried by Darius Himes, will also travel to Newspace Center for Photography in Portland, and RayKo Photo Center in San Francisco, furthering the mission of all four photography organizations to bring top emerging talent to the public.

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Theatrical | Photographer: Philip-Lorca diCorcia

Theatrical | Photographer: Philip-Lorca diCorcia | Photography | Scoop.it

DiCorcia alternates between informal snapshots and iconic quality staged compositions that often have a baroque theatricality.

Using a carefully planned staging, he takes everyday occurrences beyond the realm of banality, trying to inspire in his picture's spectators an awareness of the psychology and emotion contained in real-life situations. His work could be described as documentary photography mixed with the fictional world of cinema and advertising, which creates a powerful link between reality, fantasy and desire.

 

During the late 1970s, during diCorcia's early career, he used to situate his friends and family within fictional interior tableaus, that would make the viewer think that the pictures were spontaneous shots of someone's everyday life, when they were in fact carefully staged and planned in beforehand. He would later start photographing random people in urban spaces all around the world. When in Berlin, Calcutta, Hollywood, New York, Rome and Tokyo, he would often hide lights in the pavement, which would illuminate a random subject in a special way, often isolating them from the other people in the street.

His photographs would then give a sense of heightened drama to the passers-by accidental poses, unintended movements and insignificant facial expressions.

 

Even if sometimes the subject appears to be completely detached to the world around him, diCorcia has often used the city of the subject's name as the title of the photo, placing the passers-by back into the city's anonymity.Each of his series, Hustlers, Streetwork, Heads, A Storybook Life, and Lucky Thirteen, can be considered progressive explorations of diCorcia’s formal and conceptual fields of interest. Besides his family, associates and random people he has also photographed personas already theatrically enlarged by their life choices, such as the pole dancers in his latest series.

 


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Photo report's curator insight, September 22, 2013 6:01 AM

Philip-Lorca diCorcia  is an American photographer. He studied at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Afterwards diCorcia attended Yale University where he received a Master of Fine Arts in Photography in 1979. He now lives and works in New York, and teaches at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut.

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Voyeurs | Photographer: Dave Bush Photography

Voyeurs | Photographer:  Dave Bush Photography | Photography | Scoop.it

We are all voyeurs this day in age. It is close to impossible not to watch people at the table next to us, check out the strangers sitting across from us on a train, or find a celebrity’s Instagram and scroll away. Hitchcock preceded, in a way, today’s compulsion for viewing others through a filter of some kind, via his film Rear Window. We can all still identify with James Stewart’s wounded photographer staring through a telephoto lens into the apartments across the way, and as movie-goers staring at the screen, we were implicit in the director’s game before we even had a chance to recognize its designs.

 

New York-based photographer Dave Bush’s photos of people in cars taps into this distant gaze, one that brings us “closer” to the subject but puts us slightly on edge. We know these are strangers and yet we cannot look away from their faces, for their expressions speak to a particularly familiar kind: those that we make when we think no one is watching. These images speak to one of our most basic impulses: watching people. 


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Some Fox Trails In Virginia | Photographer: Susan Worsham

Some Fox Trails In Virginia | Photographer: Susan Worsham | Photography | Scoop.it

    This series of photographs is taken in and around Virginia, the place in which I grew up. The title comes from a book written by my father's ancestor, to show the lineage of the Fox family in Virginia. For my own purpose, it acts as a metaphorical map, of the rediscovered paths of my childhood home.

           At the age of 34, I came back to Virginia to care for my mother, who died shortly after my return. As the last of my family passed, I turned my lens to old friends, and their new families. I photographed the house in which I grew up. The man that lives there now houses snakes in my father's old office, and rests them in my old bedroom, while he changes their cages. My mother always promised that there were no snakes in my room, and now that she is gone, there are.

These photographs are not meant to be purely autobiographical, but rather representations of how I view things, based on my own experiences, and those of the people that I have met along the way. My boyfriend Michael, stands on the street I grew up on, bridging the gap between past and present. Lynn, the first stranger that ever sat for me, continues to pose for me, along with her son Max. 
I have been photographing her for seventeen years now.


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Photo report's curator insight, November 17, 2013 6:27 AM

Susan Worsham  was born in Richmond Virginia. She took her first photography class while studying graphic design in college.  In 2009 Susan was nominated for the Santa Fe Prize For Photography, and her book ” Some Fox Trails In Virginia” won first runner up in the fine art category of  the Blurb Photography Book Now International Competition. In 2010 Susan was awarded the first TMC / Kodak Film Grant, and was an artist in residence at Light Work in Syracuse, New York. Her work has been shown at the Corcoran Museum during FotoWeek D.C, LOOK3 Festival Of The Photograph, The Lishui Photo Festival in China, and most recently at the Danville Museum in Virginia. Susan was named one of PDN’s 30 Emerging Photographers To Watch in 2011, and was included in Photolucida's Critcal Mass Top 50.

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Chinese Sentiment | Photographer: Shen Wei 沈玮

Chinese Sentiment | Photographer: Shen Wei 沈玮 | Photography | Scoop.it

Shen Wei’s Chinese Sentiment series was photographed from 2008 to 2010 in Mainland China. The series is the artist’s personal journey to explore the authentic China, from both public and private perspectives. The series shows a poetic and romantic side of China. Consistent with Shen Wei's sensual and emotional style, the images are loving and keenly felt. Shen Wei’s first monograph, Chinese Sentiment, with an introduction by Peter Hessler, was published by Charles Lane Press (New York) in May, 2011.


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Photo report's curator insight, November 17, 2013 7:00 AM

"I am a Chinese photographer currently works in both New York and Shanghai. I am fascinated with people and culture and obsessed with travel and technology." said Shen Wei. 

 

Shen Wei 沈玮 is a Chinese artist known for his intimate portraits of others and himself, as well as his photographic exploration of contemporary China.

Born in Shanghai, China, Shen Wei lives in New York City. Having grown up in a shanty town in Yangpu District of Shanghai, he began his art training at an early age at a local Children's Palace.

Shen Wei’s work has been exhibited and published internationally. In 2007, American Photo magazine named Shen Wei one of the Top 15 Emerging Artists in the world. In 2008, he was included in the Photo District News’ 30 photographers to watch list. Shen Wei is the winner of 2012 Philadelphia Museum of Art Photography Portfolio Competition.

David Hellard's curator insight, November 17, 2013 12:05 PM

Outstanding photographic series. I would love to see more.

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The Best Photobooks of the Year: Martin Parr takes his pick - British Journal of Photography

The Best Photobooks of the Year: Martin Parr takes his pick - British Journal of Photography | Photography | Scoop.it
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“Gaia,The Birth Of An End” | Fine art photographer: Kirsty Mitchell

“Gaia,The Birth Of An End” | Fine art photographer: Kirsty Mitchell | Photography | Scoop.it

"Tonight it’s dark in the studio, and I’m curled up in my chair staring at this blank page, about to write the first Wonderland diary entry in 9 long months.. Outside its raining, and this morning brought the first frost I have noticed since last winter. Earlier, as I walked to work I stopped and watched a flutter of yellow leaves circle my boots, reminding me fondly of the cloak I made for ‘The Journey Home’ almost one year ago to the day. These fragments of seasons have become like old friends I find myself silently greeting, one by one as they return unannounced, blown by the autumn wind.

 

The landscape is changing in colour and I’m hoping for snow, as there is still one last picture I need to create before I can let the story complete. But for now, after months of work I am finally ready to let this last chapter unfold, of what has since become the last 4.5 years of my life.  I still can’t imagine the day I write the words ‘The End’ but it is slowly becoming a palpable reality, which leaves a bitter sweet emotion in my gut. The pictures I have created over the last few months have at times pushed me to my limit, and I know I have learnt so much about myself in the process.

 

I have had days when I have never felt to so happy to be alive, standing in the woods with my camera, so grateful for every precious moment ….. and others where my own crushing lack of self confidence has made me sick with worry, as to whether or not I have created something good enough. It is always the same with me …. all or nothing, the highest highs and lowest lows, but throughout it all I can say I have tried my hardest. I faced challenges I was genuinely scared of, but forced myself through as they were the only way to produce the ending I always dreamt of. So I just wanted to say how thankful I am to the people who have been on this journey with me and taken Wonderland into their hearts, both the followers of the project and the irreplaceable tiny team I work so closely with."- Kirsty Mitchell 


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Martin Lea's curator insight, November 25, 2013 6:52 AM

More digital imaging than photography but really creative and beautiful.........