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Rescooped by Rafael Malvestio from Fujifilm X Series APS C sensor camera
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Long Term Review: Fujifilm X-E1 for Travel and Astrophotography | lonely speck

Long Term Review: Fujifilm X-E1 for Travel and Astrophotography | lonely speck | Photography | Scoop.it

I used the Fujifilm X-E1 for 9 months as a lightweight alternative to my Canon EOS 6D. As the saying goes, the best camera you have is the one you have with you and sometimes a large DSLR is less appealing when you’re on the go. The X-E1 was my sole camera for hikes through Death Valley, Big Sur, Mojave National Preserve, and a two week trip to Vietnam. I took a total of 10,451 photographs with my X-E1 for an average of about 40 photographs per day for 9 months. (I can thank my intervalometer for those numbers). 


Via hpc
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Rescooped by Rafael Malvestio from Fuji x100s & Photography
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What is the Best Way to Post-Process Fuji X100s Colours?

What is the Best Way to Post-Process Fuji X100s Colours? | Photography | Scoop.it
I am not usually the pixel-peeping kind of photographer, nor am I obsessed with bokeh or dynamic range or tridimensional full frame perception. (Try saying that five times fast!)  If you have alrea...

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Rescooped by Rafael Malvestio from Fujifilm X Series APS C sensor camera
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Comparing the Fuji X-E2 and the Canon 5D Mark III - Ottawa Wedding Photography - Ottawa Portrait Photography

Comparing the Fuji X-E2 and the Canon 5D Mark III - Ottawa Wedding Photography - Ottawa Portrait Photography | Photography | Scoop.it

I have never been a big fan of comparing apples to apples so I thought it would be more interesting to see how Fuji’s latest release (The X-E2) compares to a work horse DSLR like the Canon 5D Mark III. The reasoning behind this is that the majority of professional photographers out there love photographing even when it isn’t for clients. The problem is that we hate carrying around that heavy gear when we don’t absolutely have to. I know what I’m talking about since I carried a 5D, a 70-200mm, a 16-35mm, and a 50mm to the top of Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania, and again on a 300km hike in Nepal. Both times I felt the urge to heave my gear over a cliff and enjoy a nice light walk for a change. While the effect isn’t as dramatic for a weekend get away, the urge to leave the gear behind is always there. This results in wanting a smaller/lighter alternative while not giving up on quality, especially when attempting to continually document your own life and family.


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