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Crop or Crap :: Math or Moment

Crop or Crap :: Math or Moment | Photography | Scoop.it
Stop Taking Pictures That Suck! Resources, educational videos, tips and opinion from photographer Zack Arias.
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Zack nails it.

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Fujifilm X: gestalt or bust

Fujifilm X: gestalt or bust | Photography | Scoop.it
The crowning achievement of Fujifilm's X series isn't its X Trans
technology. It isn't its lenses. It isn't its film simulations. It isn't
even the quality of the images its cameras and lenses produce. Each of
those, while important, is ancillary to brand cohesiveness.

Brand cohesiveness comprises many small things that combine to form a
gestalt. Having lived in Japan since the end of 2011, I have noticed a
distinct lack, or rejection of, gestalt. This lack pervades almost every
market-successful Japanese company. In the world of Japanese cars, a
specific model is recognisable as a Toyota, or a Honda, or a Suzuki by its
badge, not by the look or feel of a car, or by the people who choose to
purchase it. Without the badge, you'd be damned to guess which car belongs
to which company. For the most part, the camera world is the same. 

What is unique about Canon? Nikon? Pentax? Who are their customers? The
same could be asked of Sony, Olympus, Panasonic, etc. Each one is tackling
one thing: gaining market share. And in order to gain market share, they
must carefully hone a single benchmark: price/performance. While there are
many levels in which price/performance is important, in the long run, it
creates an incestuous market. 

A fixation on price/performance thrusts one's attention away from one's
customers. If your competition is doing X, in order for you to maintain
competitiveness in a price/performance market, you must do the same thing.
If your competition has penetrated further into a certain market, you must
follow. Failing to follow, or to meet the competition, results in loss of
market share, loss of brand awareness, and ultimately, loss of revenue.

Ultimately, the creation of unique items for a unique customer base is
unimportant. Company expansion is all that matters. And in order to expand
properly, you must catch attention at all price points, in all market
segments. Eventually, you are selling 65 different car models, or 5 dSLR
lines, a languishing mirrorless system, and still trying to coax life out
of the compact camera division. And every one of your products has an
equivalent from your competitor.

You have stopped creating. You have stopped designing. Your brand has
ceased to be anything but a metro bus. Customers hop on when you build
something great, and hop off when someone else does. You have competition,
not customers.

You are the victim of the incestuous, competition-aware market you helped
create.

It should be the other way around.

What I appreciate about Fujifilm's X series is cohesiveness. There isn't
another camera manufacturer in Japan that cares as much about operational
design, about physical layout, or about culling specific users from the
larger customer base. Their cameras polarise. That is how it should be.

Of course, it is facile to claim that no other Japanese camera manufacturer
cares about the their customers. But even under heavy review, it isn't hard
to see the detrimental outcome of the price-is-everything market- a market
that Japanese camera makers created, and have nursed, for decades.

With the X100/s and X-Pro 1, Fujifilm have built something different. On
either side of the lens, interacting with each of those cameras is unique.
They require less hands-on than the rangefinder cameras they emulate, but
boast the same approachable-ness, timeless, and haptic simplicity. They are
not sports cameras. They are not wildlife cameras. Neither one is good for
still life photography. 

But neither one is pretending to be any of the above. Both cameras were
purpose built for specific tasks and with specific customers in mind.

Fujifilm's camera division now rests in the hands of the X series.
Unfortunately, even the X series is full of listless cameras and lenses. It
isn't as tight of a system as it once was, or should be. Fujifilm lack the
focus, the history, the brand awareness, and the customer loyalty of Leica.
But I believe that Fujifilm possess the introspective fortitude to be the
leader that the Japanese camera market needs. No, I don't mean market
leader, or best-seller. Those outcomes are the icing, not the cake. 

If Fujifilm can foster a specific, loyal customer base by the creation of
unique, purpose-built, and stringently pruned camera systems, they will be
the first camera maker in Japan to shed the image of the Japanese camera as
the cost-effective alternative.
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The Great Mirrorless Camera Autofocus Shootout! (GH4, X-T1, A6000, E-M1) | TheCameraStoreTV

It seems like every 13 minutes, another mirrorless camera is announced that promises the 'World's Fastest Autofocus'. We decided to cut through all the hype and pit the fastest mirrorless cameras against each other, and we threw in a Nikon D4S, just to make it interesting. To really put these cameras through a stress test we went to Wildrose Motocross Park with a Fuji X-T1, Sony A6000, Olympus OMD E-M1 and Panasonic GH4!

Special thanks to the Wildrose Motocross Association


Via Thomas Menk
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Mirrorless camera catching up in the AF department. Not to be sneezed at. 

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Photography: What Does Art Look Like? | Richard B. Woodward

Photography: What Does Art Look Like? | Richard B. Woodward | Photography | Scoop.it

Ansel Adams, a piano prodigy before he picked up a camera, once declared that the photographic negative was like a musical "score," while the final print was akin to the concert "performance." This much-quoted simile, a reminder from a master teacher to respect every step of the photographic process, expressed an attitude that was old-fashioned by the 1960s and is even more so now in the digital era. As Adams was no doubt aware, numerous reputable artists (Walker Evans, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Richard Avedon) often had others print their negatives. To extend the Adams analogy, they composed songs or symphonies they did not always play themselves. What's more, color film throughout much of the 20th century was so expensive and messy to process that almost everyone, including Adams, turned over the job to professional labs.

All of these artists, though, if they delegated one step of the process to others, supervised the final results. And after death, if their estates authorized posthumous work, posterity was able to gauge how a print should look because identical or similar examples had been made when these artists were alive. But what if they had died and left behind rolls of film that no one ever developed, even as negatives? Do exposed frames even qualify as photographs or only as potential ones? How is someone supposed to know how to perform a "score" that the artist never finished?......


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The beautiful blueprints for Fujifilm's camera of the future

The beautiful blueprints for Fujifilm's camera of the future | Photography | Scoop.it
"If I want to play my favorite song, I want to choose my favorite guitar," says Fujifilm designer Masazumi Imai. "It’s the same with cameras. If I want to take a photograph of something important...
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Sony FE 24-70mm Zeiss lens review: A stumble in Sony's thus far excellent FE ... - imaging resource

Sony FE 24-70mm Zeiss lens review: A stumble in Sony's thus far excellent FE ... - imaging resource | Photography | Scoop.it
Sony FE 24-70mm Zeiss lens review: A stumble in Sony's thus far excellent FE ...

Via Steinar Knai
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Having used a review unit, I have to agree it isn't quite the Zeiss I was looking for. 

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Kinmun "mrbrown" Lee - Match Night on Exposure

Kinmun "mrbrown" Lee - Match Night on Exposure | Photography | Scoop.it

Certis CISCO invited me to follow one of their officers for a day for this photo essay and the opportunity for such access was too good to pass up. And so, armed with my two cameras, I met Auxiliary Police Officer (APO) Lance Corporal Nicholas Alex, a seasoned officer of eight years with the company, at his base, as he reported for duty on a balmy Saturday afternoon.The event he was on duty for that day was a Malaysia Super League match between defending champions, the Singapore LionsXII and the well-regarded team from Kelantan.Though the match wasn’t until 7.30pm at the Jalan Besar Stadium, the recently married Nicholas was already at the base with his colleagues before 2pm, to change into his uniform and draw his firearm and baton.

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https://brown.exposure.so/match-night

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Olympus OMD EM5 for Wedding Photography – 3 micro Four Third Camera Bodies – A Review

Olympus OMD EM5 for Wedding Photography – 3 micro Four Third Camera Bodies – A Review | Photography | Scoop.it
The following is dedicated to my experiences of using the Olympus OMD EM5 cameras as a Wedding Photographer. As and when, I can, I will update it with any ne
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Too powerful? Olympus E-M1 mirrorless camera leaves seasoned shooters in awe - NBCNews.com

Too powerful? Olympus E-M1 mirrorless camera leaves seasoned shooters in awe - NBCNews.com | Photography | Scoop.it
TechHive
Too powerful? Olympus E-M1 mirrorless camera leaves seasoned shooters in awe NBCNews.com Last year, Olympus delighted the photographic community with the E-M5, an extremely capable yet usable micro four-thirds camera — and it didn't hurt...
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Featured by Fujifilm

Featured by Fujifilm | Photography | Scoop.it

Truly an honor I have to share with you today - I've been featured on
Fujifilm Middle East's Facebook page.


Via hpc
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hpc's curator insight, September 23, 2013 3:28 AM

A simple way to access a facebook album of kevin photogrphy.

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Why Sharpness is Overrated in Street Photography

Why Sharpness is Overrated in Street Photography | Photography | Scoop.it
Copyright: Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos / SPAIN. Valencia. 1933. Inside the sliding doors of the bullfight arena Sharpness is over-rated in street photography. Even Henri Cartier-Bresson once said, "Sharpness is a bourgeois concept." I remember when I first saw one of HCB's exhibitions in
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My name is Gent. - Singapore National BMX Championships 2014 on Exposure

My name is Gent. - Singapore National BMX Championships 2014 on Exposure | Photography | Scoop.it
Biking has always been a big part of my life no matter the rejection. My father rode motorbikes back in the day and even had a touring bike once, the rockstar; my mother, as with many like her, just wasn’t into them two-wheelers especially when I mentioned I wanted to ride my own bicycle. It certainly didn’t help when I was knocked by a motorcyclist at a very tender age and then almost tore my left arm off during a cycling accident in school. As luck would have it, I would be constantly exposed to riding all kinds of bikes later on. Hell, even conscription had me riding an off-road scrambler as my duty to country.Then one day I bought my own bicycle and rode it home and haven’t stopped since.You probably can tell by now I’m pretty stoked about bikes and pictures, so imagine my excitement at the opportunity to shoot the Singapore National BMX Championships finals from the sidelines.
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Awesome stuff, plus he did it all with a Fuji XF 35 f1.4, which is the FF equivalent of 50mm FOV. One prime lens. To shoot sports. 

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Sony A7Regret and Fuji XT-1 Uncertainty

Sony A7Regret and Fuji XT-1 Uncertainty | Photography | Scoop.it
Andy Gallacher is an International TV Correspondent

The amount of detail from the A7R's gargantuan sensor is breath taking. 

Alright so I don’t have much to whine about. I own two of the finest
mirrorless cameras on the market and have a job that constantly puts me in
front of interesting things to take pictures of. But none the less a
compare and contrast between the Fuji and Sony at this point is something
that's warranted. You should know that this isn’t my first foray into the
mirrorless wonderland, for the past couple of years I owned, swore at and
eventually fell in love with a Fuji X-Pro1. Like many people I loved the
handling, look and image but sometimes wanted to throw the bloody thing off
a bridge. Focusing speed, shutter lag and a myriad of other issues were a
pain at first but after a series of firmware updates things got much
better. But I was still yearning for a full frame camera and then along
came the Sony A7R.

Sony A7R and the incredible Zeiss 55mm f/1.8 in Haiti. Notice how it
handles extreme shade and light.

I ordered it immediately and got one of the first out the door but
initially found it to be an unforgiving little beast. It seemed as unwieldy
and alien to me as the X-Pro1 did when I first bought that and the tiniest
adjustments made huge differences to the images I was getting. Regret set
in, compounded by blogs about light leaks and shutter vibration, but I'm
not easily dissuaded (and I'd spend a wad of cash) and despite everything
this little boxy bugger was starting to grow on me. Maybe it was going from
APSC to FF that was causing me problems initially but with each consequent
frame came vast improvements. And then there is the image quality. The
sheer amount of detail, information and latitude that this little metal box
exudes is beyond impressive. Having said that all that processing power and
megapixels in the world won't help you take pictures of your kids. Movement
is no friend of the A7R but the same can't be said of the Fuji X-T1. Now
the first thing I thought when I frantically unboxed the X-T1 was just how
good looking this thing is. It's the Brangelina of cameras, I mean this
thing is just beautiful and it's not skin deep. It feels leaps and bounds
ahead of the X-Pro1 in terms of speed and usability. For me the key reason
to trade up from the X-Pro1 wasn't the image quality but the tracking focus
and ability to fire off 8 frames a second. I recently got a chance to test
that under pretty tough circumstances and X-T1 passed with flying colors.
When I took shots of the Angola Prison Rodeo in Louisiana I was at the back
of the stadium in the press box at the long end of the 55-200 and barely
missed a shot. Tell me these shots don't look at least as good as anything
you've seen come out of a hulking DSLR and huge lens? 

The XT-1 with the Fuji 55-200 lens and 8fps is a compelling combination.

The combination worked so well that I used it to publish a picture gallery
for work. 

http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/inpictures/2014/05/pictures-bucking-broncos-at-us-j-20145911394954925.html

A7R in the Wynwood district of Miami.

So the big question I guess might be which camera is the best? Well if you
put a gun to my head and forced me to choose I would probably take the
bullet; I just love both of these cameras that much. The A7R is amazing for
landscape, urban and portrait shots and suits the pace that I work at for
the most part. The Fuji replicates all that, albeit with much smaller files
and detail, and throws in the bonus of being fast and, I think, better
looking. If you're on a  budget the Fuji will not displease but it's what I
can do with the A7R files that continues to impress. Pictures that I have
been convinced were average or just lost have turned out to be
stunning. But whenever I am packing for another trip I go through the same
dilemma - Fuji or Sony. It's most definitely a first world problem but the
fact that I lose sleep over which of these small and highly capable cameras
to take with me is a testament to how much choice and quality mirrorless
shooters have these days!

A7R - forgiveness is a wonderful thing....

Fuji XT-1 and the trusty 35mm f/1.4
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I feel the same way about my A7/55mm f1.8 and the X-T1/56mm f1.2…
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室生寺 石楠花(しゃくなげ) 2014年 (後編) / FUJIFILM X-T1 with FUJINON XF56mm F1.2 R - -お写ん歩-

室生寺 石楠花(しゃくなげ) 2014年 (後編) / FUJIFILM X-T1 with FUJINON XF56mm F1.2 R - -お写ん歩- | Photography | Scoop.it
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Translation: https://translate.google.com/translate?sl=auto&tl=en&u=http%3A//www.yaotomi.co.jp/blog/walk/2014/05/-2014-fujifilm-x-t1-with-fujinon-xf56mm-f12-r.html

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Booq Python Mirrorless Camera Case is Made for Nomadic Photographers

Booq Python Mirrorless Camera Case is Made for Nomadic Photographers | Photography | Scoop.it
The new Python Mirrorless camera case from Booq provides durable support for your photo gear and easy access to the camera.
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Uralistan: Bishkek to Kabul - ADVrider

Uralistan: Bishkek to Kabul - ADVrider | Photography | Scoop.it
Uralistan: Bishkek to Kabul Ride reports
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X100s on a motorcycle adventure across Afghanistan. Beautiful images here. 

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My name is Gent. - Thaipusam in Singapore on Exposure

My name is Gent. - Thaipusam in Singapore on Exposure | Photography | Scoop.it
Rather unfortunate events unfurled in Little India recently, bringing to light the seething displeasures of foreign visitors who now reside and work in Singapore. Cars were flipped. Windows were smashed.
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13 Amazing Professional Photographers Who Use Mirrorless Cameras on the Job

13 Amazing Professional Photographers Who Use Mirrorless Cameras on the Job | Photography | Scoop.it
As bloggers who constantly test and review photography gear, we are the very first to admit that it is surprisingly easy to let gear obsession get in the way of "real" photography–the people behind...
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Streets of Paris

Streets of Paris | Photography | Scoop.it

Went to Paris for a long weekend, we had great weather and an amazing time, loved walking the streets with my Fuji X-pro trying to capture a little bit of Paris life.


Via hpc
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Portland Saturday Market with the X-Pro1

Portland Saturday Market with the X-Pro1 | Photography | Scoop.it

Last week I had an excellent opportunity to try something I’ve been wanting to really tackle, street photography. I want to gradually get into it and feel it out so I decided to start with a little longer lens then what would normally be used in such a situation. The Fuji XF 60mm f2.4 was my lens of choice for this session. The Fuji X-Pro1 is so well suited for this kind of photography and it really shows in how it handles and how those around me perceive it


Via hpc
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