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Portraits of the kind Muslim men of Delhi: an interview with French photographer Serge Bouvet by Bianca Olivia Nita

Portraits of the kind Muslim men of Delhi: an interview with French photographer Serge Bouvet by Bianca Olivia Nita | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it
Photo report's insight:

"Serge Bouvet first went to India in 2012 with the plan to make a photo project about the hijras – a term used in Southeast Asia to define transgender people. But while documenting this story he discovered something else: the openness and beauty of the Muslim community living in the Turkman Gate old city in Delhi. Bouvet decided to photograph the Muslim men he met. And I talked to him about this project, about how he got the idea and about the way he approaches the people he photographs."- Bianca Olivia Nita

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Be colorful | Photographer: Shadi Ghadirian

Be colorful | Photographer: Shadi Ghadirian | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

Shadi Ghadirian’s photography takes conflicting visual signifiers and drags them into ironic yet subtly unnerving relationships with the viewer. Born in 1974 in Tehran, Iran, Ghadirian emerged in 2000 among a generation of photographers prepared to tackle the confusing reality of a woman’s place in contemporary Iran and to play with understandings of the region. She has exhibited widely, participating in biennales in Russia, Sharjah (UAE); solo exhibitions in the US and India, and prestigious group shows including "Unveiled, New Art From the Middle East" at the Saatchi Gallery, London, and the touring Word Into Art exhibition at The British Museum and DIFC, Dubai.

 

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Muslims in Britain | Photojournalist: Justin Jin

Muslims in Britain | Photojournalist: Justin Jin | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"From humble beginnings fifty years ago, when men from Pakistan and India arrived to take up factory jobs in England, the Muslim community has grown to become a significant force in the British society.

Today, generations of Muslims live happily as British citizens, study and working side-by-side with the whites. Yet harmony is being eroded by terrorism and a growing siege mentality. In the impoverished north, where crumbled textile factories stand as stark reminders of better days, Muslims confine themselves to bleak, isolated quarters." - Justin Jin

Commissioned by M Magazine of Holland.

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The possessed of Hazrat Ali Mira Datar | Travel Photographer: Tewfic El-Sawy

The possessed of Hazrat Ali Mira Datar | Travel Photographer: Tewfic El-Sawy | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"The Possessed of Mira Datar is about the shrine of a Sufi saint in Gujarat (India) where hundreds of Muslim and Hindu pilgrims come every day. The belief that this saint can rid people of evil spirits, and other assorted maladies, has continued undiminished for over 600 years. Stories of possessed pilgrims being cured by vomiting snakes, scorpions and nails are circulated by the religious keepers of the shrine, to maintain their status and financial gains."

-Tewfic El-Sawy

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Turkman Gate | Photographer: Serge Bouvet

Turkman Gate | Photographer: Serge Bouvet | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

"Usually, in India, the Muslim segregated areas are seen as ghettos. However, these should be seen as cultural pockets, where group solidarity is strong. Turkman Gate is the old city around which the New Delhi city has come up. It would be wrong to brand whole of Turkman Gate as a ghetto, as it houses various wholesale markets and different communities as well. Ghettos are usually formed by new migrants to the city to hold on to their culture in an alien environment. People have been living here since centuries; they are the real residents of Delhi city and still follow age-old ‘Delhi culture." Serge Bouvet

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Blue eyes, black hijab | Photographer: Isabella De Maddalena

Blue eyes, black hijab | Photographer: Isabella De Maddalena | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

There's a large muslim community in Aarhus, Denmark, and a very high number of danish converted to Islam. The estimated number of women wearing the niqab in Denmark is about 150-200. Aisha is a Danish woman who converted to Islam 22 years ago, when she was just 20. Today, she wears the niqab, the 'total veil', subject of many discussions in different countries in Europe.


Like so many other governments in Europe, the idea of banning the burqa or niqab in public places has been progressing in Denmark. The debate caused a split beetween the Conservatives and the Liberal Party in 2009. Lawyers of the Justice Ministry finally found the proposal unconstitutional.


But today the idea is still a topic of discussion: it is argued that the burqa or the niqab are strongly anti-integrationist, an attack on the dignity of women and also a security risk. "Even if the Niqab will be banned, I'll continue to wear it, anyway," Aisha says, it is my religion, my choice and I have to respect it. - 

Photo report's insight:
Isabella De Maddalena  was born in Santa Margherita Ligure, Italy, in 1978.                                                                              

In 2002 she graduated from the Brera Academy of Fine Art in Milan, with a focus in Painting. She studied photojournalism at the Danish School of Photojournalism in Aarhus, Denmark in 2010.
Her work has been published on varoius magazines, among them: Women's Wear Daily, Io Donna, IL - Intelligence in Lifestyle, Rolling Stone, Internazionale, L'Espresso, Allure Russia, Cosmopolitan Germany.
In 2011 I joined the agency Luzphoto.  

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Goodbye My Chechnya | Photographer: Diana Markosian

Goodbye My Chechnya | Photographer: Diana Markosian | PHOTOGRAPHERS | Scoop.it

For young girls in Chechnya the most innocent acts could mean breaking the rules.A Chechen girl caught smoking is cause for arrest; while rumors of a couple having sex before marriage can result in an honor killing.

The few girls who dare to rebel become targets in the eyes of Chechen authorities.After nearly two decades of vicious war and 70 years of Soviet rule, during which religious participation was banned, modern-day Chechnya is going through Islamic revival. The Chechen government is building mosques in every village, prayer rooms in public schools, and enforcing a stricter Islamic dress code for both men and women. This photo essay chronicles the lives of young Muslim girls who witnessed the horrors of two wars and are now coming of age in a republic that is rapidly redefining itself as a Muslim state. - Diana Markosian

Photo report's insight:

The Russian republic of Chechnya has been undergoing an Islamic revival. Having existed under Soviet rule for 70 years before getting caught up in a war with the Russian Federation that lasted almost two decades, the tiny state has turned to Islam in what looks to be an attempt to maintain some semblance of identity and drive a wedge between itself and the land of Putin. The Chechen government is building mosques in every village, prayer rooms in public schools, and enforcing a stricter Islamic dress code for both men and women. It might be miles away from Islamabad, but Chechnya's gone Islamamad.

For young women in particular, this has led to a change in what they can expect to do with their lives. Smoking, for instance, is definitely a good reason to spend a night in jail, while premarital sex must seem less attractive when the president of your country has given his public approval to any family who feels like carrying out an honor killing.

Photographer Diana Markosian spent some time in the area getting to know a group of Muslim girls who grew up during the wars, chronicling their coming of age in a region that is rapidly redefining itself as an Islamic state.

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Khanh Fleshman's curator insight, December 6, 2013 8:54 AM

This appears on my page because it shows the troubles of women in countries like Chechnya and how hard every day life is for them. People that could benefit from reading this are women in countries that may take their rights and freedoms for granted, because it provides the perspective of women who are forced to live in these restricting conditions. This relates to Half the Sky because the book also illustrates how easy it is for women in these societies to make perceived transgressions in the eyes of the men.