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Rowman and Littlefield | Homeric Megathemes: War-Homilia-Homecoming

Rowman and Littlefield | Homeric Megathemes: War-Homilia-Homecoming | philologia | Scoop.it
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The international impact of Maronitis’ work, which combines German-style philology with a Greek-style literary sensibility, can be most fully realized in the present English-language version. This book exemplifies the vitality of contemporary Hellenic scholarly engagement with the masterpieces of classical and preclassical Greek literature.
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A(n Incomplete) Survey of Digital Tools for Classicists

A(n Incomplete) Survey of Digital Tools for Classicists | philologia | Scoop.it
A repository for digital tools developed by and for Classical scholarship.
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Women in ancient Greece and Rome with surviving works or fragments

Women in ancient Greece and Rome with surviving works or fragments | philologia | Scoop.it
GREEK AUTHORS
• PHILOSOPHY
Aesara of Lucania: “Only a fragment survives of Aesara of Lucania’s Book on Human Nature, but it provides a key to understanding the philosophies of Phintys, Perictione
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Companion to "The Worlds of Roman Women"

Companion to "The Worlds of Roman Women" | philologia | Scoop.it
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Α compendium of un-adapted Latin texts, glossed and hyperlinked, by or about Roman women from all ranks and status groups, together with abundant illustrative images from the ancient world and brief essays that suggest the range of women´s activities, concerns, and social roles in ancient Rome.
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Teaching Latin in the 21st century

Teaching Latin in the 21st century | philologia | Scoop.it
We are in the age of the science, technology, engineering and maths. But is liberal arts education an ex­pensive luxury in the 21st century?
Many professionals believe liberal education prepares people for the world of work by providing them with a set of employability skills, the ability to think for themselves, skills to communicate effectively, and the capacity for lifelong learning.
While unveiling a new edition of iPad, the late Steve Jobs said: “It’s in Apple’s DNA that technology alone is not enough – it’s technology married with liberal arts, married with the humanities that yields us the result that makes our hearts sing.”
Liberal arts encourage people to take courses in humanities (e.g. English literature, Classics, modern languages, History), creative arts (Fine art, theatre, creative writing), and the sciences. Liberal arts education introduces us to the treasure trove of literature and languages.
Another reason to value a liberal education lies in its roots. It is related to democratic principles because its roots can be traced to great thinkers of ancient times.
Students hear and speak a lot about politics and democracy. But do they know they are using classical Greek words? For example, politics comes from polis, meaning city-state. Have they heard or read about Aristotle’s famous dictum in Politics “that man is by nature a political animal – zoon politikon” and that in his Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle says that “the goal of education is not to teach what virtue is, but to mould students into virtuous individuals”.
Do they know that democracy was born in 508 BC with the reforms Cleisthenes introduced to allow Athens to be ruled by the people, for the people – demos (common people) and kratos (rule, strength)?
I know that in the 21st century students should study science, maths and technology, which after all, are liberal arts. But there are also many compelling reasons for studying Latin today.
I totally disagree with those who say Latin is dead because it is not spoken. With that argument one would conclude that Shakespeare’s English and Dante’s Italian are dead too because they are not spoken by the average person. I am certain people still enjoy reading and studying Shakespearean works and the Dante’s ‘Divine Comedy’.
Writer, journalist, lecturer and broadcaster Peter Jones, who published Learn Latin, Learn Ancient Greek and other books, says: “Classics (Latin and Ancient Greek) are good to think with”. Sceptics may reply that so are Maths and Physics. This is true, but do they also provide you with a great literature and culture as these ‘dead’ languages do?
Some may argue that we can read and enjoy this ancient literature through translations. One enjoys reading or listening to Shakespeare’s plays in their original, not in another language. This same stands for Dante and Latin authors.
Latin teaches English grammar and spelling, and stimulates students to learn other languages. It also encourages logical thinking, grammatical training and develops intellectual rigor.
Latin is indirectly spoken in the Romance languages – French, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese and Romanian. English is a Germanic language but more than half of its vocabulary is Latin-rooted. For example, ‘father’ in Latin is pater and in German, vater; apart from the similarity, we have direct Latin origin for the English: paternal, patristic, patrimonial, and so on.
Latin opens up a vast vocabulary of science (scientia – knowledge), as every creature (creare – to create) and plant has a Latin name, and every scientific discipline is steeped in vocabulary derived from Latin.
If students learn to enjoy the puzzle solving inherent in Latin translation, they may find that puzzle solving inherent in scientific method is a natural and enjoyable extension. Charles Zubrod, one of the founders of chemotherapy, was once asked what led him into a life of cancer research. He replied: “The study of Latin and Greek as a child.” Could there be link between Latin and chemotherapy?
It encourages logical thinking, grammatical training and develops intellectual rigor
J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series, with its spells and incantation of Latin origin and ancient mythology, has influenced students abroad to opt for Latin as one of their languages. Spells found in Harry Potter, such as the spell to disarm an opponent – Expel­l­iaramus – contains Latin expelli (expel) and Latin arma (arms) plus a Latin ending – us.
Facebook’s 1.2 billion users can now choose Latin as their default language. Incidentally, Rowling and Facebook creator Mark Zuckerberg both read Latin at University.
The so-called ‘long-dead’ Latin is enjoying something of a modern renaissance. Over 3,000 people have subscribed to a new monthly magazine, Hebdomada Aenigmatum, which features crosswords and other puzzles in Latin.
At Rome’s Academia Vivarium Novum, Latin is a lot more than ludum, or a game, for students. Academia director Luigi Miraglia told NBC News: “After the fall of the Roman Empire, Latin continued to be the language used by philosophers, scientists, scholars and intellectuals. Now we want to bring back that great humanistic tradition, and the only way to do it is to encourage our students to immerse themselves completely in Latin.”
Far from being dead, Latin and classical Greek will never die. Firstly, they survive in English and in the Romance languages; secondly, now they are also found in most of our technical words and IT vocabulary such as monitor (Latin: moneo-ere), kilobytes, megabytes, gigabytes, printer (Latin: premere), and so on.
The teaching of Latin in the 21st century has discarded old methods and texts that used to learn the language. Today, the trend is more on reading and understanding and analysing, plus the knowledge of history, culture and life of our ancestors. Malta was under the Romans for 1,000 years, including, of course, the Byzantine period, after which it fell in the Arabs’ hands.
Cambridge, Oxford, Harvard and other universities are publishing hundreds of Classical books every year. Some British primary schools have also introduced Latin for eight- to 10-year-olds with Barbara Bell’s Minimus & Minimus Secundus comics with Latin texts.
Thanks to the internet, one can find contemporary news in Latin and even in Classical Greek – Ephemeris, Nuntii Latini Universi; Nuntii Latini from Finland; Acropolis World News contemporary news in Classical Greek by Juan Coderch from the University of St Andrews. Today one finds even contemporary novels such as Harry Potter series translated into Latin, and even Classical Greek.
You too can receive Latin e-mails from all over the globe if you go to www.man.torun.pl/archives/ subscribe/grex and register your e-mail address – it is free.
At the new Institute for Foreign Languages that opened in 2012 in Beijing, China, students are reading Latin too. In Germany, apart from the fact that some Latin knowledge is a pre-requisite for all university faculties, there are 800,000 students reading Latin in colleges and universities.
Marion Gibbs, headmistress and examiner of the Open University, wrote: “Classics is one of the broadest subjects, encompassing two different languages, a wealth of literature, poetry, drama, history, philosophy and a rich feast of art and architecture.”
The Classical Association in the UK and the Joint Association for Classics Teaching has worked hard to keep Latin in UK schools’ curriculums. Not only was it successful but it was even introduced in primary schools. Of course, Latin, like other subjects that require attention and concentration, is for the motivated.
What about Malta? Are we an exception? The study of Latin in Malta was included in State, private and Church schools’ curricula up to the 1980s, and beginning of 1990s. Unfortunately it was subsequently scrapped. On looking at our national curriculum I noticed that students can opt for Arabic, French, Italian Spanish, German and Russian – but Latin is missing.
Why is English deteriorating in our schools? Latin basics would be an asset to better our English language and to learn other Romance languages. Today our students have all the facilities they need. When I was a student, it was harder. We only had textbooks and notes given by our teachers. I must admit that with inclusive education teachers have to work harder as they are faced with different pupils – motivated and unmotivated.
There is very little Latin at the Seminary in order to comply with Pope St John XXIII’s Apostolic Constitution Veterum Sapientia. Latin is the official language of the Church, proclaimed by Pope St John XIII as “the ‘mother tongue’ acceptable to countless nations – as it is not only universal but also immutable”. He added: “Latin helps the young mind to grasp things accurately and develop a true sense of values.”
Latin has survived at our University through the hard work of the Classics and Archaeology Department, which now boasts a Malta Classical Association (MCA) that is also publishing its annual journal Melita Classica. I hope this young association will promote and work hard to see Latin again with other languages in our schools’ curricula. I also encourage parents, educators and opinionists to help the MCA to promote the study of Latin.
Bagio Vella is honorary president of the Malta Classics Association.

Via Charles Tiayon
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Perseids | A Collaborative Editing Platform for Source Documents in Classics

The Perseids platform allows students and scholars to collaborate on digital editions and annotations in an integrated online environment. After successfully completing a first phase of development, Perseids is now poised to support the elaboration of a new undergraduate curriculum in the Humanities in the US and abroad. The cornerstone of this initiative is the integration of teaching and research in the Humanities classroom, emulating the way students participate in research teams in the natural sciences. In order to reach this objective, we plan to tackle four main areas:

1) Collaboration, sharing, and reuse

2) Assessment methods

3) Data ownership and quality control

4) Complex annotation and publication workflows

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“It is like something out of Antigone [who was forbidden to bury the body of her brother killed in battle].”

“It is like something out of Antigone [who was forbidden to bury the body of her brother killed in battle].” | philologia | Scoop.it
Turkey goes to the polls on Sunday in a parliamentary election that threatens to increase polarisation in a country that is already deeply divided. At stake is the extent to which President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and his Justice and Development Party (AKP), which has ruled Turkey since 2002, can establish one-party rule and near monopoly of political power. 
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CVA - Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum

CVA - Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum | philologia | Scoop.it
The Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum ('Corpus of Ancient Vases') is the oldest research project of the Union Académique Internationale.
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Classics for the people – why we should all learn from the ancient Greeks

Classics for the people – why we should all learn from the ancient Greeks | philologia | Scoop.it
The dazzling thought-world of the Greeks gave us our ideas of democracy and happiness. Yet learning classics tends to be restricted to the privileged few. It’s time for ‘elitist dinosaurs’ to embrace a citizens’ classics for all
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The Art of Classical Greece (ca. 480–323 B.C.) | Essay | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

The Art of Classical Greece (ca. 480–323 B.C.) | Essay | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art | philologia | Scoop.it
“Greek artists of the fifth and fourth centuries B.C. attained a manner of representation that conveys a vitality of life as well as a sense of permanence, clarity, and harmony.”
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Bibliography

Bibliography | philologia | Scoop.it
Archaeogaming continues to be published in peer-reviewed journal articles, in book chapters, in popular archaeology magazines, and in standalone monographs. Below is a growing list of publications focusing on video/digital game archaeology (with a bit of history and pedagogy thrown in for good measure). Archaeogaming theses and dissertations for MA, MSc, and PhD work are…
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Rowman and Littlefield | Homeric Megathemes: War-Homilia-Homecoming

Rowman and Littlefield | Homeric Megathemes: War-Homilia-Homecoming | philologia | Scoop.it
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The international impact of Maronitis’ work, which combines German-style philology with a Greek-style literary sensibility, can be most fully realized in the present English-language version. This book exemplifies the vitality of contemporary Hellenic scholarly engagement with the masterpieces of classical and preclassical Greek literature.
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Lyric Mapping Project | Department of Classics

Lyric Mapping Project | Department of Classics | philologia | Scoop.it
Mapping Greek Lyric: Places, Travel, Geographical Imaginary, created by David Driscoll, Israel McMullin, and Stephen Sansom, headed by Anastasia-Erasmia Peponi
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A Don’s Life: Greece versus Rome

This evening I did a gig with Boris Johnson at Intelligence Squared:  a cultural combat of ancient Greece versus ancient Rome. It was partly an event in benefit of "Classics for All", the charity that gets Classics teaching into state schools.
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Dante turns in his grave as language declines

Believe it or not, the land where Latin originated and from which many other European languages descend is becoming "illiterate."

Not only have Italians long forgotten the language of their Roman Empire, but they hardly know how to speak and write proper Italian.

They've been negatively dubbed "asini" (donkeys), as in "stupid."

If you take a look at Italian language forums and debate websites it's clear that many Italians are clueless on grammar and don't even know how to use verbs properly.

At age 15, Italian students rank below the OECD average literacy level and Eurostat reports that Italy has the lowest percentage of university graduates aged 30-34 in the European Union.

The media reflect society. Evening news bulletins are full of speakers and commentators making grammatical errors and even mispronouncing words.

How could Dante's land become "ignorant" and will the government's plans to institute yet another education reform succeed in turning some donkeys -- if not into nerds -- at least into smart pupils?

The decline in language skills is a trend affecting most of the Western world, but the fact that this is happening in Italy, home to some of the world's oldest universities, is quite alarming.

The Romans built an empire united by the Latin language, but Italians seem to have lost such heritage.

Italians were once "literate" -- as in "Latin-speakers and Latin-writers" -- grammar-savvy, poetry lovers, rhetoric freaks and great philosophers.

Now they've forgotten what a conjunctive verb is, mistake adjectives for nouns and write Machiavelli with a double "c." Oh -- and they don't know how to break words into syllables.

True, one could say Italian is a tough language, one of the most complex in the world.

But that's not a good excuse.

The Italian people's declining knowledge of their language is turning into a national emergency. It's not just lazy students who are responsible. The percentage of lawyers who every year flunk the written examination to become a judge is scary.

When I attended university, the most dreaded exam of all was the essay on Italian literature and history. Few of my buddies passed it at the first go, others had to take it thrice and many just gave up.

So how did we fall so low?

Fine, ICT, smartphones and SMS are partly to blame. Abbreviations, misspellings and the introduction of many English words into Italian have impoverished language skills.

Yet on its own that explanation is too reductive.

The loss of Latin teaching in schools is at the root of the problem. Learning Latin assists in learning Italian and other languages as well as opening the mind to all fields of knowledge.

It's been no secret across generations of scholars that being familiar with the complexity of Latin phrase structure and idioms is positive for students.

Up until 1970, Latin was taught in primary and middle schools: kids learned to translate works by Virgil without using a dictionary and to recite chunks of the "Divine Comedy" and poems by Carducci, Leopardi and Manzoni.

But today the teaching of Latin is restricted to specific humanist and scientific high schools -- called gymnasiums or lyceums -- and at university level depending upon the faculty.

The crisis has dealt a further blow to the love of classics. Enrollment at classical lyceums, where also ancient Greek is also taught, is low: Only 31,860 out of a total 530,911 high school students have enrolled this academic year.

Desperate attempts by modern writers to revive classical culture by translating Boccaccio's "Decameron" and Machiavelli's "The Prince" into modern Italian haven't produced great results.

Via Charles Tiayon
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AWOL - The Ancient World Online: Open Access Ancient Language Textbooks and Primers

AWOL - The Ancient World Online: Open Access Ancient Language Textbooks and Primers | philologia | Scoop.it
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Looking inside ancient Greek texts with visualization tools

Looking inside ancient Greek texts with visualization tools | philologia | Scoop.it
Since I won't have time to talk about this in detail during my ten minute bit for our Future of Classics discussions, I thought that the blog might be the appropriate forum to pre-emptively follow-...
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Syrian refugees find catharsis on ancient Greek play | Middle East | Worldbulletin News

Syrian refugees find catharsis on ancient Greek play | Middle East | Worldbulletin News | philologia | Scoop.it
Syrian refugee women in Lebanon are performing a modern version of Antigone by Sophocles to reflect their own contemporary traumas
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Sunoikisis DC

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Consortium of Classics programs developed by the Harvard’s Center for Hellenic Studies. The goal is to extend Sunoikisis to a global audience and contribute to it with an international consortium of Digital Classics programs (SunoikisisDC). SunoikisisDC is based at the Alexander von Humboldt Chair of Digital Humanities at the University of Leipzig. The aim is to offer collaborative courses that foster interdisciplinary paradigms of learning. Master students of both the humanities and computer science are welcome to join the courses and work together by contributing to digital classics projects in a collaborative environment.

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