FOI
22 views | +0 today
Follow
FOI
Curated by rokzu
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by rokzu from DNA and RNA research
Scoop.it!

Using planarian flatworms to understand organ regeneration

Using planarian flatworms to understand organ regeneration | FOI | Scoop.it

In a new study published in the October 16 issue of Developmental Cell, corresponding author Professor of Cell and Developmental Biology and Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator Phillip Newmark and colleagues report the identification of genes that control growth and regeneration of the intestine in the freshwater planarian Schmidtea mediterranea.


Via Integrated DNA Technologies
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by rokzu from Top Selling Monoclonal Antibodies 2014
Scoop.it!

Generation of cell type-specific monoclonal antibodies for the planarian and optimization of sample processing for immunolabeling

Generation of cell type-specific monoclonal antibodies for the planarian and optimization of sample processing for immunolabeling | FOI | Scoop.it
Efforts to elucidate the cellular and molecular mechanisms of regeneration have required the application of methods to detect specific cell types and tissues in a growing cohort of experimental animal models. For example, in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea, substantial improvements to nucleic acid hybridization and electron microscopy protocols have facilitated the visualization of regenerative events at the cellular level. By contrast, immunological resources have been slower to emerge. Specifically, the repertoire of antibodies recognizing planarian antigens remains limited, and a more systematic approach is needed to evaluate the effects of processing steps required during sample preparation for immunolabeling.

Via Krishan Maggon
more...
Krishan Maggon 's curator insight, October 4, 2015 7:57 AM
 
BMC Dev Biol. 2014 Dec 21;14:45. doi: 10.1186/s12861-014-0045-6.
Generation of cell type-specific monoclonal antibodies for the planarian and optimization of sample processing for immunolabeling.
Forsthoefel DJ1, Waters FA2, Newmark PA3.
Author information
1Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, B107 Chemical and Life Sciences Laboratory, 601 S. Goodwin Ave., Urbana, IL, 61801, USA. davef@life.illinois.edu.2Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, B107 Chemical and Life Sciences Laboratory, 601 S. Goodwin Ave., Urbana, IL, 61801, USA. forrest__waters@hotmail.com.3Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, B107 Chemical and Life Sciences Laboratory, 601 S. Goodwin Ave., Urbana, IL, 61801, USA. pnewmark@life.illinois.edu.
Rescooped by rokzu from PARP Inhibitors Cancer Review
Scoop.it!

First signalling pathway of the digestive lineage in planarians is described

First signalling pathway of the digestive lineage in planarians is described | FOI | Scoop.it
A scientific study describes for the first time the function of a signalling pathway –particularly, the pathway of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) - in the differentiation of the planarian digestive lineage. EGFR pathway, evolutionarily preserved, has a fundamental role when regulating the cell differentiation and proliferation in lots of organisms (such as mammals' neural stem cells) and it is over-activated in most of human cancers.
Via Krishan Maggon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by rokzu from CxBooks
Scoop.it!

The First Brain: The Neuroscience of Planarians (by Oné R. Pagán)

The First Brain: The Neuroscience of Planarians

~ Oné R. Pagán (author) More about this product
List Price: $35.00
Price: $29.38
You Save: $5.62 (16%)

Planarians, a class of flatworm, are extraordinary: they possess the remarkable ability to regenerate lost body parts, including complete regeneration of the nervous system. If cut into pieces, each piece of the planarian can regenerate into a complete organism. They are also unique among invertebrates in that they display addiction-like behaviors to many drugs abused by humans. Because of these distinct neurological traits, the planarian is often used as an animal model in neurological research, being used most recently for developments in neuropharmacology.
The First Brain is a discussion of how planarians have been used in neuropharmacology, and what role they have played in scientific developments that have a high impact on our culture. Planarians have been the animal models for research in drug addiction, antidepressant development, and various other topics in biology, neurobiology, and even zoology. Pagán uses these flatworms as a framework to explore the history of biological research. The book provides accessible background information on how biomedical research is impacted by evolution, and defines neurobiology and neuropharmacology in ways that are easy to understand. At the same time, Pagán provides enough detail for the book to useful for scientists working in various subsections of biology.
The planarian has played a key role in the history biological, neuropharmacological, and zoological research, and has even made appearances in a few unexpected places in popular culture. Oné Pagán explores all these roles, and shows us why the planarian truly is one of the most extraordinary and influential organisms in scientific research today.


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by rokzu from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Planarian regeneration model discovered by AI algorithm

Planarian regeneration model discovered by AI algorithm | FOI | Scoop.it
An artificial intelligence system has for the first time reverse-engineered the regeneration mechanism of planaria — the small worms whose extraordinary power to regrow body parts has made them a research model in human regenerative medicine.

The discovery by Tufts University biologists presents the first model of regeneration discovered by a non-human intelligence and the first comprehensive model of planarian regeneration, which had eluded human scientists for more than 100 years. The work, published in the June 4 issue of PLOS Computational Biology (open access), demonstrates how “robot science” can help human scientists in the future.

To bioengineer complex organs, scientists need to understand the mechanisms by which those shapes are normally produced by the living organism.

However, there’s a significant knowledge gap between the molecular genetic components needed to produce a particular organism shape and understanding how to generate that particular complex shape in the correct size, shape and orientation, said the paper’s senior author, Michael Levin, Ph.D., Vannevar Bush professor of biology and director of the Tufts Center for Regenerative and Developmental Biology.

“Most regenerative models today derived from genetic experiments are arrow diagrams, showing which gene regulates which other gene. That’s fine, but it doesn’t tell you what the ultimate shape will be. You cannot tell if the outcome of many genetic pathway models will look like a tree, an octopus or a human,” said Levin.

“Most models show some necessary components for the process to happen, but not what dynamics are sufficient to produce the shape, step by step. What we need are algorithmic or constructive models, which you could follow precisely and there would be no mystery or uncertainty. You follow the recipe and out comes the shape.”

Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
Josep M Torra Colom's curator insight, June 6, 2015 5:53 AM

añada su visión ...

Rescooped by rokzu from Autoimmune diseases (Lupus, RA), Vaccines and Stem Cell Therapies Highlights
Scoop.it!

Researchers Discover a Key Molecular Signal That Shapes Regeneration in Planarian Stem Cells

Researchers Discover a Key Molecular Signal That Shapes Regeneration in Planarian Stem Cells | FOI | Scoop.it
Researchers at the Stowers Institute have identified a key molecule that directs stem cells in the planarian flatworm to make copies of themselves.
Via Krishan Maggon
more...
No comment yet.