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Column: Getting the IPR dosage right

Column: Getting the IPR dosage right | PharmEmerge | Scoop.it

"Patents blocking access to life-saving drugs is a myth with only 5% of MNCs’ drugs under patent protection in India"

Protecting intellectual property will help bring new solutions to treat patients suffering from critical and rare diseases and new medicines to save and improve lives.

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Intellectual Property and Economic Development
by Rod Hunter - Today's Zaman, your gateway to Turkish daily news

Intellectual Property and Economic Development <br/>by Rod Hunter - Today's Zaman, your gateway to Turkish daily news | PharmEmerge | Scoop.it
In his recent State of the Union address, US President Barack Obama reiterated his ambition to complete the Trans-Pacific Partnership, a proposed trade agreement among the US and 11 Pacific countries. Meanwhile, the European Union and China are pressing to close their own deals in Asia and elsewhere. If these proliferating trade pacts are to spur virtuous cycles of growth for developing countries, they must not only reduce trade barriers; they must also build the institutional framework of a modern economy, including robust intellectual property (IP) rights.
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Emissions from coal plants causing high mortality, diseases - The Hindu

Emissions from coal plants causing high mortality, diseases - The Hindu | PharmEmerge | Scoop.it
The Hindu Emissions from coal plants causing high mortality, diseases The Hindu Titled 'Coal Kills — An Assessment of Death and Disease caused by India's dirtiest energy source,' by Urban Emissions.info and Greenpeace India, with support from...
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AstraZeneca begins cancer research in Russia - BioSpectrum Asia

AstraZeneca begins cancer research in Russia - BioSpectrum Asia | PharmEmerge | Scoop.it
Russia's NN Petrov Institute of Oncology will collaborate with AstraZeneca's Oncology Innovative Medicines group to identify genetic mutations in cancer patients
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Princeton University - Biehl explores consequences of Brazil's constitutional right to health

Princeton University - Biehl explores consequences of Brazil's constitutional right to health | PharmEmerge | Scoop.it
Christopher Ward's insight:

Study examing law suits under Brazil's right to health reveals that nearly two-thirds of all suits were to access drugs already on the government formulary

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Promoting Life Style Changes While Cutting Health Spending will do Little to Address Russia's Chronic Disease Burden - Chris Ward

Promoting Life Style Changes While Cutting Health Spending will do Little to Address Russia's Chronic Disease Burden - Chris Ward | PharmEmerge | Scoop.it
Christopher Ward's insight:

According to media reports, Russia intends to restrict advertising of fast foods, carbonated beverages and other snack foods in an effort to address through lifestyle changes its enormous chronic disease burden. At the same time , Russia has announced it will cut health care spending further impeding the country's ability to significantly improve health outcomes in the short-term.

While ecouraging better nutrition and other healthy lifestyle changes is laudable, lifestyle changes will take years if not generations to have a major impact on the prevelance of chronic disease in Russia. In the meantime the country suffers from a massive social and economic burden of chronic diseases, many of which are inexpensively treatable and manageable.

Preventing chronic diseases by encouraging healthy lifestyles is an essential stratgey for fighting chronic diseases, but so to is improving access to medicines. While it may take years to see an improvement in health outcomes in Russsia through lifestyle changes, improving access to medicines can deliver immediate benefits. 

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China seeks innovation space in Gujarat - The Times of India

China seeks innovation space in Gujarat - The Times of India | PharmEmerge | Scoop.it

Chitra Unnithan,TNN | Dec 3, 2012, 04.57AM IST 

 

AHMEDABAD: Sias International University, the first American-owned University in Central China, is exploring opportunities to set up an innovation centre in Gujarat.

The university is considering joint product development with Gujarat's universities in the innovation centre.

The intellectual property rights of products developed jointly by the Chinese and Gujarati universities, will be shared.

The promoter and chairman of the university—Xiaochun Chen will visit the state on December 7, 2012 for talks with several universities on joint research and product development.

Sias runs on a combination of Chinese and American philosophies.

The Government of Henan province has allotted 20 square kilometres of land for the university to build an innovation and incubation park, a science park and information technology park.

"China's education system has excellent methods and approaches in higher education. The key is the linkage between industry and academia," said Jagat Shah, chairman, India China Economic & Cultural Council (ICEC ) Gujarat, who is coordinating Chen's visit to the state.

The university is also expected to sign a memorandum of understanding (MoU) at Vibrant Gujarat 2013 on student-faculty exchange, joint research and other academic opportunities.

"At the vocational education level, India with a young and ambitious population is missing the opportunity to engage them as a part of mainstream economic growth through manufacturing. This is where China leapt forward and engaged the masses through low-cost, volume-based manufacturing.

The partnership can help students in Gujarat learn about this and a lot more from Chinese counterparts," said Shah.

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China & India to be bigger than US, eurozone & Japan combined by 2030: OECD - The Economic Times

China & India to be bigger than US, eurozone & Japan combined by 2030: OECD - The Economic Times | PharmEmerge | Scoop.it

"China's economy is likely to overtake the euro zone's this year, India is leapfrogging Japan and by 2030 the Asian pair will be bigger than the United States, euro area and Japan combined, the OECD said on Friday."

"In a crystal-ball exercise to tease out long-term trends in the global economy, the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development said the combined gross domestic product of China and India was likely to exceed that of all the current Group of Seven rich economies by around 2025."


http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/economy/indicators/china-india-to-be-bigger-than-us-eurozone-japan-combined-by-2030-oecd/articleshow/17156627.cms

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China Diabetes Triples Creating $3.2 Billion Drug Market

China Diabetes Triples Creating $3.2 Billion Drug Market | PharmEmerge | Scoop.it

"Prevalence of Type 2 diabetes, a disease linked to inactivity and excess calories, has more than tripled in China over the past decade, fueling 20 percent-a-year growth in drug sales and straining health services. It’s also stoking need for newer, costlier medications fromMerck & Co. (MRK), Novo Nordisk A/S (NOVOB) and Sanofi that help avoid blood-sugar spikes and complications such as heart attack and stroke."


"As few as two in five diabetics in China have their blood- sugar under control, said Ji Linong, president of the Chinese Diabetes Society, potentially damaging the heart, blood vessels, kidneys, eyes and feet. That compares with the U.S., where blood-sugar is controlled in 70 percent, according to Manish Pant, director of policy and programs at the International Diabetes Federation in Brussels."

 

"A key difference is that an average of $194 a year is spent treating each diabetes patient in China, versus more than $5,000 in developed countries such as the U.S., the IDF said. Even as China’s health-spending is forecast to almost triple to $1 trillion over the next eight years, surging rates of diabetes mean China is struggling to detect cases and provide basic care, according to Pant.

 

"China has almost four times as many people with diabetes than the U.S., where there are 23.7 million sufferers, according to the IDF. By 2030, 40 million more will have the condition in China, where diabetes causes 173.4 billion yuan ($28 billion) a year in medical costs, the diabetes group estimates."

 

"China’s diabetes drugs market will expand 20 percent annually to reach 20 billion yuan ($3.2 billion) by 2016, spurred by guidelines that set higher treatment standards, said Yan Gaojun, a Shanghai-based consultant with IMS Health Inc. China’s pharmaceuticals market overall will increase 15-to-18 percent a year to reach as much as $165 billion over the same period, the research company said in July".

   


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India's trade policies slammed

India's trade policies slammed | PharmEmerge | Scoop.it

"Throughout the 2012 election cycle, China and Iran have dominated the foreign policy discussion. But after Election Day, policymakers will need to address a looming threat to American innovation and jobs: India, whose recent troubling mercantilist trade practices have set off alarm bells"


"Increasing R&D means greater innovation and development of advancements that have the power to make positive societal and economic changes. Unfortunately, India's policies do not achieve this objective, but rather put both U.S. and Indian innovation in jeopardy. And by making it much more difficult for American innovations to be sold in the country, India's policies hurt American workers and innovative sectors of our economy."


"In March, the India Patents Controller issued a compulsory license (essentially a government-mandated licensing of a patent) for an innovative cancer therapy that was researched and developed in the United States. As a result of this extraordinary decision, premised on the fact that the product is not manufactured in India, an Indian biopharmaceutical company is now reaping the rewards of American innovation. This decision is in direct violation of the World Trade Organization (WTO) agreement and is a deeply troubling sign for all U.S. IP-intensive industries."

 

"This is but one of at least five separate actions recently taken by the Indian government aimed at stripping innovative biopharmaceutical companies' intellectual property for the benefit of India's domestic industry. Meanwhile, even as Indian generic drug sales to the United States have grown dramatically, data suggests India has routinely flouted trade rules to bolster its generic industry at our expense. Without access to the Indian market, biopharmaceutical innovators lose access to a great number of consumers, which impacts demand and ultimately affects jobs in the United States that rely on innovation and R&D".

 

"But it's not only in America's interest for India to remain committed to open, market-based trade and robust IP protections; it's also in India's. If India is to realize its extraordinary economic potential and lift hundreds of millions of its citizens out of poverty, the best way to do so is through promoting innovation by investing in R&D and protecting the rights of innovators, by raising its productivity across the board, and by abandoning protectionist policies"


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Climate change adding sting to mosquito bite, says WHO report - The Economic Times

Climate change adding sting to mosquito bite, says WHO report - The Economic Times | PharmEmerge | Scoop.it
The warning is ominous — climate change and global warming will make vector-borne diseases like dengue and malaria – already causing havoc in the country more lethal.
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Global Polio Eradication Initiative A Partnership that is Getting Results

Global Polio Eradication Initiative A Partnership that is Getting Results | PharmEmerge | Scoop.it

Since 1988 2 billion children immunized, 20 million health workers and volunteers mobilized, over 1.5 million children's  deaths averted. 

 

Thank-you Rotary, WHO, UNICEF, CDC for making this happen and thank you to the pharmaceutical researchers and developers around the world who developed and modified the vaccines that have saved so may lives. 

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India Drug makers’ Sep quarter profit seen rising 20-30%

India Drug makers’ Sep quarter profit seen rising 20-30% | PharmEmerge | Scoop.it

"Mumbai: India’s top drug makers may see profit rise 20-30% in the quarter ended 30 September, boosted by selling new products in the US and a favourable currency movement. The companies may report 23-28% annual growth in revenue, analysts expect. The projected revenue growth is similar to the preceding two quarters ended June, although earnings have fluctuated because of foreign exchange losses, acquisitions and tax-related expenses." "Sun Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd, Glenmark Pharmaceuticals Ltd,Lupin Ltd and Cipla Ltd are likely to be among the top performers because they introduced new generic drugs in the US for which they have exclusive marketing rights for 180 days."  

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The Future of Global Health Depends on Strong IPRs - IPWatchdog.com | Patents & Patent Law

The Future of Global Health Depends on Strong IPRs - IPWatchdog.com | Patents & Patent Law | PharmEmerge | Scoop.it

Dr. Kristina Lybecker: "without intellectual property rights private investment in expensive, risky and uncertain biopharmaceutical research and development projects would not take place." 

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Bill Gates meets Montek Singh Ahluwalia to discuss healthcare issues - The Economic Times

Bill Gates meets Montek Singh Ahluwalia to discuss healthcare issues - The Economic Times | PharmEmerge | Scoop.it
Bill Gates met Planning Commission deputy chairman Montek Singh Ahluwalia to discuss healthcare issues, including India's low healthcare expenditure.
Christopher Ward's insight:

Bill Gates calls out India's low health care spending: 


India's 12th Five Year plan has projected to increase healthcare spending to 2.5% of GDP compared to little over 1% of its GDP every year as of now." 

"This is significantly low as compared to 15% and 8.5% in US and UK respectively."

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To Reduce Global Poverty, We Must Tackle Non-Communicable Diseases - Forbes

To Reduce Global Poverty, We Must Tackle Non-Communicable Diseases - Forbes | PharmEmerge | Scoop.it
Forbes To Reduce Global Poverty, We Must Tackle Non-Communicable Diseases Forbes Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) – including cardiovascular disease, cancer, chronic respiratory disease and diabetes – are the leading causes of death in the world,...
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Healthcare Insurance in China

Healthcare Insurance in China | PharmEmerge | Scoop.it
Among the most important factors that will drive the success or failure of China’s healthcare reforms is the evolution of both a public and private insurance market.  It can be tempting, and certainly some in business are of the opinion, that...
Christopher Ward's insight:

"If successful, a vibrant private healthcare insurance market would offer individual Chinese who want to pay for care not accessible via the public insurance space to do so.  In many cases, the sort of care they may aspire to will constitute drugs and procedures that are more innovative and thereby not impacted negatively by China’s government initiated purchasing plans.  While the size of the private healthcare insurance market in China today is still small, accessing it and establishing a connection with the patients who use it, the doctors who serve within in, and the procedures consumers select from it, are all meaningful insights."

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From CMAJ Journal : Progress Against Neglected Diseases

While progress is being made some sobering thoughts on the need to focus not just on medicines but on the strength of health delivery systems

Christopher Ward's insight:

 

 

"Future progress will depend on such factors as the strength and efficiencies of health delivery systems in endemic countries; access to affordable medicines; trained health care workers; national policies in such areas as public health, water and sanitation; and life's inevitable vicissitudes. "The transmission and persistence of pathogens responsible for neglected tropical diseases depend on vectors or intermediate hosts. Thus, there is the risk that sufficient access to medicine alone will not enable targets to be achieved if measures to control vectors or their intermediate hosts and species are inadequate," it states, noting that dengue fever ranked as the fastest spreading vector-borne viral disease in 2012, indicating a need for the world to "change its reactive approach and instead implement sustainable preventive measures that are guided by entomological and epidemiological surveillance."

 

http://www.cmaj.ca/site/earlyreleases/4theRecord.xhtml

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Swiss Re: China to See Huge Health Protection Gap in 2014 - Financial and Business News - MENAFN

Swiss Re: China to See Huge Health Protection Gap in 2014

BEIJING, Nov 29, 2012 (Menafn - SinoCast Daily Business Beat via COMTEX) --Swiss Re-insurance Company said yesterday that China's health protection gap could hit USD 12.2 billion in 2014 and may further widen to USD 73 billion in 2020.

China will see the biggest health protection gap among the 13 countries and regions like Japan, India, Indonesia, Thailand and Malaysia studied by Swiss Re. In its latest research report, the Switzerland-based company predicted that Asia-Pacific is likely to witness a health protection gap of USD 197 billion in 2020.

China, India, Japan and South Korea may see the biggest health protection gap before 2020, according to Swiss Re, noting that health care costs in Asia-Pacific will swell to USD 2.7 trillion in 2020 from USD 1.2 trillion in 2010.

Source: www.nbd.com.cn (November 29, 2012)

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CEO Insights On Emerging Market Biosimilar Production & Manufacturing Trends - Life Science Leader

Bert Liang Liang shares his insights on emerging markets and reverse innovation trends in biosimilar production and manufacturing.

 

"Our challenge is to come up with novel ways to develop the products within the confines of the environment, cost structure, and resources. It is changing one’s focus so that we’re looking at how to get the medicine to those people and still provide a return for our investors. Our strategy has been to identify partnerships within regions, which allow us to be reverse innovators. We learn from these partners who live and breathe the milieu where we are developing our product strategies. It isn’t a matter of just transferring product or intermediates to these regions, it is about thinking strategically on what makes sense to efficiently do product development. We’re not ‘throwing it over the fence’ to Pune or Bangalore or Shenyang or Shanghai. We’re taking lessons from these regions back to the West."

"We look at this approach as a strategic advantage, rather than looking only at more traditional partnering with larger companies that are trying to drive things in the West predominantly"


 "Biologics are a challenge; it isn’t synthetic chemistry. The expertise to do this at a high quality level is currently nascent in many emerging markets. Process development and bioanalytical analysis in these regions often lags behind Western geographies. There is a lot of teaching that has to go on to ensure that quality will be high enough for everybody to feel comfortable that a product administered to individual patients will have minimal risk. Patient outcome is the key."

"Interestingly enough, India has significant experience making some types of biologics, like vaccines. This expertise can be leveraged in order to make sure the biologic that is being made in the biosimilars (and innovative) arena is of high quality."

 

 

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Health care in China: Entering ‘uncharted waters’ - McKinsey Quarterly - Health Care - Hospitals

Health care in China: Entering ‘uncharted waters’ - McKinsey Quarterly - Health Care - Hospitals | PharmEmerge | Scoop.it

Three themes will shape China’s health-care market: the continuation of economic and demographic trends, further health-care reform, and the policies articulated in the government’s 12th five-year plan. Some of these forces—such as improvements in infrastructure, the broadening of insurance coverage, and significant support for innovation—will have positive implications for multinational companies. Others—for example, pressure on pricing and the rise of local champions—will have negative implications. In certain respects (including the bid to reconcile low-cost universal health-care coverage with rewards for innovation) the forces come into direct opposition. To paraphrase Vice Premier Li Keqiang, reform of the country’s health-care system has entered “uncharted waters.”*

 

* Li Keqiang made this remark during the Chinese national conference on the deepening health-care reforms as China’s vice premier and leader of its overall agenda for health-care reform.

 

https://www.mckinseyquarterly.com/Health_Care/Hospitals/Health_care_in_China_Entering_uncharted_waters_3028

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Baxter Announces Long-Term Partnership in Brazil to Expand Access to Recombinant FVIII Hemophilia Treatment - Drugs.com MedNews

DEERFIELD, Ill.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Nov 1, 2012 - Baxter International Inc. (NYSE:BAX) today announced an exclusive 20-year partnership with Hemobrás (Empresa Brasileira de Hemoderivados e Biotechnologia) to provide hemophilia patients in Brazil greater access to recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII) therapy for the treatment of hemophilia A. Hemophilia A is a genetic condition in which the body does not produce enough clotting protein factor VIII. It is estimated that more than 10,000 people in Brazil are living with hemophilia A, and today the vast majority are treated with plasma-derived FVIII therapy.1"

 

"Baxter recently highlighted the importance of developing innovative business models, including public and private partnerships, aimed at improving the quality of and access to care in both developed and emerging markets."

 

"Through this innovative partnership, Baxter will be the exclusive provider of Brazil's recombinant FVIII treatment over the next 10 years while the companies work together on the technology transfer to support development of local manufacturing capacity by Hemobrás. Baxter will receive cash payments for product it supplies to Hemobrás and, following completion of the technology transfer, royalties on recombinant FVIII produced by Hemobrás. The company expects peak annual sales to exceed $200 million"

 

1 Federação Brasileira de Hemofilia. Accessed on: 10 March 2011. Available at :http://www.hemofiliabrasil.org.br

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China to launch stroke-checking campaign - People's Daily Online

China to launch stroke-checking campaign - People's Daily Online | PharmEmerge | Scoop.it

BEIJING - A campaign will be launched to check high-risk groups for cerebrovascularaccident, or stroke, in more than 200 cities, the Ministry of Health has announced.

A sample survey conducted in 2008 found that cerebrovascular disease was theleading cause of death in China, with its incidence rate increasing by 8.7 percentannually.

On Monday, also World Stroke Day, Vice-Minister Ma Xiaowei said, "Chronic diseases-- notably cerebrovascular accident, heart diseases and high blood pressure -- havebeen severely affecting people's health in recent years, and an increasing number ofpeople suffer and die from strokes especially."

In addition to screening, Ma revealed that more than 30,000 professionals will betrained on the prevention and treatment. The government will also provide morehospitals with screening and treatment equipment for the disease.

Figures from the ministry show that 30 percent of people suffering stroke attacks diesubsequently. Some 70 percent of stroke survivors suffer varying degrees of disabilitysuch as hemiplegia or aphemia.

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India: The roots of poverty: Ruinous healthcare costs

India: The roots of poverty: Ruinous healthcare costs | PharmEmerge | Scoop.it

LiveMint : Thoughtful and well-written viewpoint by Anirudh Krishna

 

"Even moderately well-to-do people have become persistently poor.This is unfortunate, especially when we consider that the majority of these descents into poverty could have been prevented. Very little is being done, however, to address the problem of poverty creation."


"Restricting the flow of people into poverty requires investing in better – more affordable, accessible, and higher quality – healthcare. Becoming richer as a nation will not automatically resolve this problem."

 

It starts with healthcare A vast and growing body of work has started to show how the source of a great deal of poverty is inadequate healthcare. Several other factors are also associated with falling into poverty, but in terms of frequency and magnitude the effects of ill health and medical expenses predominate. Illhealth imposes a double burden on households – when high treatment costs go together with loss of earning power – and it has the biggest influence on becoming and remaining poor. Researchers who have studied these trends in different countries describe how, because of poverty neglect, a “medical poverty trap” is becoming ever more pervasive (see Whitehead, et al. 2001; Xu, et al. 2003; Zhao 2006). Millions of families are living only one illness away from poverty, and thousands more have become deeply indebted on account of burdensome healthcare costs. 60% of all families who fell into poverty in the Rajasthan communities we studied, 74% in Andhra Pradesh, and 88% in Gujarat experienced one or more catastrophic health episodes. Calculations by other researchers show how a stupendous number – amounting to 3.7% of the Indian population – is at risk of falling below the dollar-a-day threshold every year on account of healthcare expenses (EQUITAP 2005; Garg and Karan 2005).
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Thaqiv Idraqie's curator insight, January 30, 2013 8:50 AM

From this article I learned how poverty can take its toll on people through many mediums. In this case, it was through healthcare. The inefficient and ineffective healthcare provided by India's ministry of health has caused the lives of some to change. In addition because of the medical industry lack of competence with modern day technology, they will tend to use aiding methods that are more pain-staking, thus more expensive.

This shows that if a country is under poverty, its people will suffer its toll. The effects of poverty are similar to that of a chain reaction. Poverty will affect the government to those industries to the workers and to the people, increasing in damage as it progresses through the stages. 

The article also provides ways in which the government is planning to counter these predicaments. It is via provision, insurance and regulation. Firstly it has to work with countries like Sweden,USA or other developed countries that have up to date medical treatments. From this the ministry of health in India would have more in depth knowledge to treat more complex illnesses effectively. Secondly, insurance refers to the availability servises. Knowing that India is a big pile of land with many different people, it is very important that the country has sufficient doctors to treat the population of illnesses. Lastly, regulation is the increased commercialization of medical services coupled with weak or absent regulation has resulted in a proliferation of fly-by-night operators, over-prescription, over-charging by private providers, spurious drugs, and other avoidable evils. Without taking account of these developments, it is hard to explain why the financial burden of healthcare costs has risen so sharply, especially among poorer and less literate people.

 

Jerone Taduran's curator insight, February 1, 2013 12:54 PM

A lot of family are pushed into penury when a member of the family or the learning member become ill and the medical cost is unbearable. Most of the time families have fixed income and no surplus money to save for emergency , most of them do not know about insurance nor they have capacity to pay the premium. I indeed pity the family of Chandbai, a 50-year-old woman who are suffering tremendously from lack of healthcare causing many illness and diseases to their family. Her husband, Gokalji, owned a shop in their town. But because of low healthcare, he became ill and had to give to shop to his brother while he lies down in his bed most of the time. Two years after the death of his husband, their daughter got married. It was sad to hear the story because of illness and diseases, he is not able to see his daughter climbing the steps of life, the reason why he was working everyday was to see his children succeed, now he cant do that. If the nation knows that there are a lof of people who are in need of help, dont just sit in your chair reading this article, do something actively and effortly to yourself and to the people who are in the state of poverty

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Listing of India's Pharmaceutical Billionaires

The Hunan Report recently releases its list of India's wealthiest. Key players within India's pharmaceutical sector dominate the list including 11 billionaires whose net worth exceeds India's annual expenditure on medicines. See the full India Rich List by clicking the link at the end of this post.

Here's the list of India's pharmaceutical billionaires.

 

Dilip Shangvi Sun Pharmaceuticals Net Worth: US $8.5 billion

Pankaj Patel Cadilla Healthcare Net Worth: US $2.5 billion

Desh Bandhu Gupta Lupin Pharmaceuticals Net Worth: US $2.5 billion

Cyrus Poonawall Serum Pharma Net Worth: US $2.3 billion

Yasul Hamied Cipla Net Worth US $2.3 billion

Habal Khorakiwala Wockhardt Net Worth US $1.9 billion

Sudhir & Samir Mehta Torrent Pharma Net Worth US $1.7 billion

Ajay Piramal Piramal Healthcare Net Worth US $1.6 billion

Murali Divi Divi’s Labs Net Worth US $1.5 billion

K Anji Reddy Dr. Reddy’s Labs Net Worth US $ 1.4 billion

Glenn Saldanha & Family Glenmark Pharma Netw Worth: US $1.1 billion

 

http://www.hurun.net/usen/Default.aspx

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