Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News
186.0K views | +30 today
Follow
Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News
Pharmaguy curates and provides insights into selected drug industry news and issues.
Curated by Pharma Guy
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Pharma Guy
Scoop.it!

Crisis in $12B U.S. Opioids Market? From Cannabis?

 

The U.S. opioids market was valued at US$ 12,046.3 million in 2015 and is expected to witness a moderate CAGR of 5.2% during the forecast period (2016–2024).

 

According to the New York Times analysis of state data, in 2016, drug overuse led to death of 59,000 to 65,000 people in the U.S. and majority (about two-third) of death were due to opioids overuse and this number is witnessing an increase. According to a survey of National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA), deaths due to the overdose prescription of opioid pain relievers have more than tripled in the past 20 years, escalating to 16,651 deaths in the U.S. in 2010. It can be concluded from the analysis of the data (data from the survey and New York Times data), that death due to opioids have more than doubled in the past six years.

 

In October 2016, though the Government of the U.S. declared opioids crisis as an emergency. The declaration is expected to help in increasing awareness among the public about overuse of opioids. It would also make doctors and pharmacy stores hesitant to over-prescribe or overstock opioids. The government has approached leading pharmacy chains, insurance companies, and others, for cooperation. For instance, Attorney General of over 35 states sent a letter to the America’s Health Insurance Plans, national association whose members provide coverage for health care and related services, urging its members to reconsider coverage policies that may be fueling the opioid crisis in October 2017. Such measures can ensure proper usage of opioids and favors the market players in the U.S. opioids market.

 

 

Increasing incidences of chronic pain is expected to drive growth of the U.S. opioids market

According to the American Academy of Pain Medicine (AAPM), 2011, around 1.8 billion people suffered from chronic pain. Moreover, according to the National Institute of Health (NIH) estimates in 2015, one in 10 people in the U.S. suffered from chronic pain. Increasing prevalence of chronic pain is expected to result in high prescription of opioids pain relievers, which in turn is expected to fuel the market growth. Easy availability and favorable insurance policy are other major drivers for growth of the U.S. opioids market.

 

The analysis of Medicare prescription drug plans, which covers 35.7 million people in the second quarter of 2017, by ProPublica — an investigative journal and The New York Times — a leading U.S. newspaper, revealed that only one-third of the covered people had any access to other types of pain killer and less-risky opioids. This was attributed to low cost of opioids drugs. The scenario might change, however, due to strict monitoring from government and regulatory bodies. 

 

Cannabis as potential alternative for pain relief can be a threat to the U.S. opioids market

Cannabis could be the alternative therapy for opioids. Currently, medical marijuana is legal in 28 states and the District of Columbia even though it is illegal under federal law. According to a research published in Annals of Internal Medicine, in majority of cases, between 45% and 85%, medical marijuana is used for pain management. However, there is some ambiguity about medical marijuana effectiveness in pain management. Cannabis could be used as effective therapy after establishment of clinical trials. 

Some major players operating in the U.S. opioids market include Purdue Pharma L.P., Titan Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Boehringer Ingelheim GmbH, Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Sanofi S.A., Sun Pharmaceuticals Industries Limited, Mallinckrodt Pharmaceuticals, Egalet Corporation, Endo Pharmaceuticals plc, Allergan, plc, and Pfizer Inc.

 

Further Reading:

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pharma Guy
Scoop.it!

Patients with Chronic Pain Will Help Medical Marijuana To Become Major Part Of Pharma Industry

Patients with Chronic Pain Will Help Medical Marijuana To Become Major Part Of Pharma Industry | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

According to a research report by New Frontier Data, medical marijuana sales are forecast to grow to $5.3 billion in 2017, accounting for 67 percent of total cannabis sales. Medical sales in currently legal states are forecast to grow to $13.2 billion by 2025, at which point medical sales will account for 55 percent of all sales. In comparison, adult-use sales in 2017 are forecast to reach $2.6 billion, rising to $10.9 billion by 2025.

 

Medical cannabis products are known to be beneficial for such conditions as chronic pain, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), sleep disorders, anxiety, nerve pain and others. “Looking at these numbers, it would appear that medical cannabis would be a drop in the bucket when it comes to impacting the total pharmaceutical industry. However, when you start to break down the numbers by specific sectors of the industry, like chronic pain or symptoms associated with chemotherapy, which are very lucrative markets for pharmaceutical companies, you will certainly see cannabis have a major impact,” said Aguirre De Carcer, CEO of New Frontier Data.

 

The research points out that the United States constitutes 35 percent of the global pharmaceutical market, the largest market in the world, and a major driver of the US economy, and it is estimated that cannabis and related products can replace $4.4 billion to $4.9 billion per year of current spending on existing treatments.

 

Further Reading:

more...
Andrea Villarreal's curator insight, December 14, 2017 2:27 PM
Many of the people that use pain killers and other substances will be a great part into making marijuana become part of the pharma industry because they will that they wont waste as much money as they usually do and will have a better result that actually helps them with there pains.
Scooped by Pharma Guy
Scoop.it!

Justin Bieber Condemns Big Pharma For Blocking Medical Marijuana Laws

Justin Bieber Condemns Big Pharma For Blocking Medical Marijuana Laws | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

Despite growing evidence that medical marijuana laws decrease the use of prescription drugs and improve quality of life for many patients, cannabis is still classified as a schedule 1 drug, meaning it has “no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse,” per the Drug Enforcement Administration.

And pharmaceutical companies continue to fiercely fight legalization. The industry spent more than $880 million fighting legislation that would help to alleviate America’s opioid crisis over a decade, according to The Associated Press.

more...
Mmj Doctor's curator insight, November 6, 2016 12:41 PM

MMJ Doctor- Medical Marijuana doctor-  offers Exceptional Medical Cannabis Evaluations. Our mission is to ensure everyone can be evaluated to see if medical marijuana is something that can benefit them with their medical conditions. Our California licensed 420 doctors will never turn away anyone who needs a medical marijuana 420 evaluations. Visit our 420 friendly website to get best prices and coupons for medical marijuana doctor - cannabis clinic. We are the best 420 evaluations clinic in San Francisco and San Jose. Get your cannabis card from top rated Medical Marijuana Doctor in all San Francisco Bay Area!

mmjdoctor.com

Scooped by Pharma Guy
Scoop.it!

Legalization of Medical Marijuana Reduces Prescription Medication Use

Legalization of Medical Marijuana Reduces Prescription Medication Use | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

Legalization of medical marijuana has been one of the most controversial areas of state policy change over the past twenty years. However, little is known about whether medical marijuana is being used clinically to any significant degree. Using data on all prescriptions filled by Medicare Part D enrollees from 2010 to 2013, we found that the use of prescription drugs for which marijuana could serve as a clinical alternative fell significantly, once a medical marijuana law was implemented. National overall reductions in Medicare program and enrollee spending when states implemented medical marijuana laws were estimated to be $165.2 million per year in 2013. The availability of medical marijuana has a significant effect on prescribing patterns and spending in Medicare Part D.

Pharma Guy's insight:

Oldsters like their marijuana! Read: “Legalization of Marijuana. Will It Hurt Pharma?”; http://bit.ly/1icywQr ‘And so does the surgeon general. read: "Marijuana Can Be Helpful,’ Admits Surgeon General"; http://sco.lt/5bHaKn But pharma doesn't so much! Read: "Is #Pharma Delaying Legalization of Medical Marijuana?"; http://sco.lt/5YBnWb  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pharma Guy
Scoop.it!

On Marijuana, Hillary Clinton Sides with Big Pharma Over Young Voters

On Marijuana, Hillary Clinton Sides with Big Pharma Over Young Voters | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

As her lead in the polls continues to dwindleHillary Clintonis trying her best to appeal to young voters, who favor her main opponent, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders. Clinton goes to ridiculous lengths in her attempts to woo young people into supporting her campaign: she’s whipped and nae-naed on Ellen, dubbed herself Chillary Clinton, and even asked college students to describe how they felt about their student debt “in three emojis or less.”


Although it seems that she’ll do anything to get their votes, there’s one thing Hillary Clinton won’t do: champion the issues that young voters care about.


While 77% of young Democrats believe marijuana should be legal, Hillary Clinton is unwilling to support meaningful marijuana reforms. She’s opposed decriminalizing marijuana during her previous presidential run and has given little indication that she changed her position on the issue since. Today, Clinton will only go so far as to support the rescheduling of marijuana to Schedule II, giving it the same legal status as cocaine and methamphetamine.


It’s unlikely that Clinton’s reluctance to embrace marijuana law reform will help her gain popularity among young voters. But her positions on this issue are certainly in line with the interests of a key ally of hers: Big Pharma.


Despite naming the pharmaceutical industry as one of her greatest “enemies,” Hillary Clinton has received more money from drug companies than any other candidate this cycle. Pharmaceutical manufacturers donated more than $340,000 for her 2008 presidential bid – and in just the first six months of her 2016 campaign, Clinton has received over $160,000 from drug companies. To top it off, Big Pharma giants Pfizer and Proctor & Gamble each have donated between $1 million and $5 million to the Clinton Foundation. And that’s likely just the tip of the iceberg, as Clinton enjoys the support of numerous Super PACs whose finances are notoriously obscure.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pharma Guy
Scoop.it!

Big Pharma Missing the Medical Cannabis Bandwagon

Big Pharma Missing the Medical Cannabis Bandwagon | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

Greg Engel, CEO of Tilray, says:


I have dedicated my entire career to the health care industry because it's important to me to spend my life doing something that helps people. Now, after more than 25 years, I have decided to leave behind the big pharma establishment in order to embark on a new journey on the cutting edge of health care, as the first CEO of Tilray, Canada's leading licensed producer of medical cannabis.


One of the top five reasons why:


Today, as big pharma struggles to differentiate itself beyond incremental advances in treatment, to gain reimbursement for promising but costly therapies, and to rationalize the high price tag for biologics to treat rare diseases, the helping professions need to be open to alternative treatment options that have huge potential to radically transform the lives of patients suffering from a wide range of conditions.


Medical cannabis has that potential.


Pharma Guy's insight:


"The last thing [pharma] companies want see is current product lines that are producing dependable revenue flow to be dented by legal marijuana," says Lee Jackson, author of the Daily Finance article cited above (see here). "The big pharmaceutical firms have a lot of money to spread around, so when it comes to lobbying efforts, very few have this group's clout. One thing it wants is for marijuana to remain illegal."


more...
saturat van's curator insight, March 12, 2015 7:50 AM
KALYAN MATKA TIPS AUR SATTA MATKA RESULT FASTEST, satta matka, kalyan satta matka, kalyan matka tips http://sattamatka11.net
Scooped by Pharma Guy
Scoop.it!

Is #Pharma Delaying Legalization of Medical Marijuana?

Is #Pharma Delaying Legalization of Medical Marijuana? | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

Poll after poll has shown well more than 80 percent of Pennsylvanians favor empowering doctors to recommend medical cannabis as a treatment option. This was the purpose of my Senate Bill 1182: Allowing the medical use of cannabis.


The federal government knows cannabis has medical value: U.S. Patent 6630507 states that cannabis is a neuroprotectent and an antioxidant.


However, organizations like Smart Approaches to Marijuana and some pharmaceutical companies are becoming more vocal in their opposition to the legalization of medical cannabis. Their goal appears to be delay — to perhaps give pharmaceutical companies time to develop a synthetic form of cannabis that can be mass produced and distributed.


The problem is that cannabis as a natural plant is more effective and more efficient working in the human body with fewer side-effects than any synthetic compound. Pharmaceutical companies simply cannot synthesize cannabis into a compound that works as well as the natural plant in the human body. Meanwhile, synthetic painkillers now cause more than 15,000 overdose deaths a year in the United States (according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention). No one has ever died from an overdose of cannabis.

Pharma Guy's insight:


Smart Approaches to Marijuana favors the" establishment of an emergency or research FDA IND program that allows seriously ill patients to obtain non-smoked components of marijuana before final FDA approval." Sounds like a PhRMA spokesperson to me!


Daily Finance article titled "Will National Legalized Marijuana Help or Hurt Big Pharma, Tobacco and Alcohol?" reiterated the "Silver Tour" claim that there are many medical conditions "where the ingestion of marijuana has been believed to help alleviate or control the symptoms. These include glaucoma, multiple sclerosis, AIDS-related complications, Crohn's disease, fibromyalgia, chemotherapy complications and others." You can also add Alzheimer's Disease and depression to that list. Since many of these conditions are common in the elderly, senior citizens may benefit the most from the legalization of marijuana.

Pharma companies, however, are very actively pursuing drugs for the treatment of the most common maladies of senior citizens. This may be why Pfizer, for example, created its "Getting Old" campaign.

"The last thing [pharma] companies want see is current product lines that are producing dependable revenue flow to be dented by legal marijuana," says Lee Jackson, author of the Daily Finance article cited above. "The big pharmaceutical firms have a lot of money to spread around, so when it comes to lobbying efforts, very few have this group's clout. One thing it wants is for marijuana to remain illegal."

Aside from the medical need, another reason why legalizing marijuana makes sense: the "war" against it has failed.


For more on this, read read: Legalization of Marijuana. Will It Hurt Pharma?



more...
Cass OMalley's curator insight, September 2, 2015 1:07 PM

Holistic approaches to health and wellness sans synthetic compounds is where it's at -- please weigh in on this topic!

Scooped by Pharma Guy
Scoop.it!

Lower Opioid Overdose Death Rates Associated with State Medical Marijuana Laws

Bottom Line: States that implemented medical marijuana laws appear to have lower annual opioid analgesic overdoses death rates (both from prescription pain killers and illicit drugs such as heroin) than states without such laws although the reason why is not clear.


Author: Marcus A. Bachhuber, M.D., of the Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and colleagues.


Background: Prescriptions for opioid painkillers for chronic pain have increased in the United States and so have overdose deaths. However, less attention has been focused on how the availability of alternative nonopioid treatment, such as medical marijuana, may affect overdose rates.


How the Study Was Conducted: The authors examined the implementation of state medical marijuana laws and opioid analgesic overdose deaths in the United States between 1999 and 2010. Three states had medical marijuana laws prior to 1999, 10 states implemented laws between 1999 and 2010 and nine states had laws that went into effect after 2010, which was beyond the study period. The authors also considered New Jersey’s law effective after the study period because it took effect in the last quarter of 2010. The authors analyzed state laws and death-certificate data.


Results: States with medical marijuana laws had a 24.8 percent lower average annual opioid overdose death rate compared to states without such laws. In 2010, that translated to about 1,729 fewer deaths than expected. The years after implementation of medical marijuana laws also were associated with lower overdose death rates that generally got stronger over time: year 1 (-19.9 percent), year 2 (-25.2 percent), year 3 (-23.6 percent), year 4 (-20.2 percent), year 5 (-33.7 percent) and year 6 (-33.3 percent).


Discussion: “In summary, although we found a lower mean annual rate of opioid analgesic mortality in states with medical cannabis laws, a direct causal link cannot be established. … If the relationship between medical cannabis laws and opioid analgesic overdose mortality is substantiated in further work, enactment of laws to allow for use of medical cannabis may be advocated as part of a comprehensive package of policies to reduce the population risk of opioid analgesics.”


(JAMA Intern Med. Published online August 25, 2014.doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2014.4005. Available pre-embargo to the media at http://media.jamanetwork.com.)

Pharma Guy's insight:


Is this good news or bad news for pharma companies that market opioid drugs? Tell me your thoughts after reading this: Legalization of Marijuana. Will It Hurt Pharma?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pharma Guy
Scoop.it!

Is There a Role for Medical Cannabis in Combating the Opioid Epidemic?

Is There a Role for Medical Cannabis in Combating the Opioid Epidemic? | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

The current opioid epidemic is forcing many physicians to reevaluate their use of prescription opioids for pain control and to consider alternative pain management strategies. There is an emerging body of evidence that suggest that medical cannabis (smoked, vaporized or ingested) can effectively manage and control chronic non-cancer pain, reduce opioid consumption and help to lower opioid overdose deaths.

While cannabis is not approved as a treatment for pain in the US, there is a growing body of evidence from states where medical cannabis is legal that cannabis reduces opioid consumption in chronic pain patients. Several studies in the US and around the world showed that opioid use dropped by as much as 50% among chronic pain patients when they were given access to cannabis.

 

More...

Pharma Guy's insight:

Guest post by Cliff Mintz who writes for Cannabis Science Blog.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pharma Guy
Scoop.it!

Health Benefits of Marijuana Infographic

Health Benefits of Marijuana Infographic | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

Also, Big Pharma won't like this:

 

People with Medicaid coverage who live in states with medical marijuana laws are less likely to take medications commonly prescribed to treat conditions like nausea, pain, and depression, according to a new study.

 

The research, published last week in Health Affairs, looked at nine conditions and found reductions in prescriptions of medications used to treat depression (13%), nausea (17%), psychosis (12%), seizure disorders (12%), and pain (11%). There was no statistically significant difference for drugs used to treat anxiety, glaucoma, sleep disorders, and spasticity.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pharma Guy
Scoop.it!

Insys, Maker of a Fentanyl Opioid Spray, Donates $500K to Anti-Marijuana Campaign

Insys, Maker of a Fentanyl Opioid Spray, Donates $500K to Anti-Marijuana Campaign | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

Insys Therapeutics has donated $500,000 to an anti-legalization of marijuana campaign in Arizona known as Proposition 205. Pro-legalization advocates view the half million dollar donation as a further attempt to line the pockets of powerful drug corporations with profits by making it near-impossible for marijuana manufacturers to compete. Insys Therapeutics is a pharmaceutical company responsible for the production of a controversial oral fentanyl spray marketed as Subsys. Fentanyl is a highly addictive, extraordinarily powerful opiate typically used to sedate patients who are undergoing major surgery. The drug is 50 times more potent than morphine. It’s also the same drug responsible for the deaths of Michael Jackson and more recently, Prince. With the ever-growing opioid epidemic in the country, I ask: What could possibly justify a prescription oral spray of such an incredibly risky drug for the treatment of pain when marijuana can effectively (and safely) do the same for far less money?

Insys Therapeutics claims their donation was made out of concern over the safety of marijuana, stating their primary goal is to protect society’s overall health and well-being. That’s pretty interesting considering the company itself is currently under state and federal investigation in relation to its marketing tactics. Six states have already investigated the company’s sales practices, with the state of Illinois having sued Insys in August of 2016 for allegedly promoting the drug to doctors for uses other than those approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It’s also interesting to note the company is developing its own form of synthetic cannabis; one they say will improve upon a similar drug they used to manufacture which has since been discontinued. It seems quite obvious the company is not too concerned over the safety of cannabis itself but rather, anyone else making a profit from it but them. Their donation is one of the largest ever made to an anti-legalization campaign.

Pharma Guy's insight:

A former sales manager for Insys Pharmaceuticals, which manufactures a highly addictive painkiller (Sunsys Fentanyl - 100X more powerful than morphine) and is under investigation in multiple U.S. states, has pleaded guilty to charges of fraud: http://sco.lt/5f8yLx 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pharma Guy
Scoop.it!

Cam Newton Was Not the Only One "Blocked" During Super Bowl 50

Cam Newton Was Not the Only One "Blocked" During Super Bowl 50 | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

If you’re like a plurality of Americans, you spent Sunday night watching the Super Bowl along with its celebrated commercials that technically take up more time than actual game-play. Those ads are incredibly lucrative; CBS–which is airing the game this year–is reportedly charging $5 million for 30 seconds of airtime. And what mega-rich multinational corporation wouldn’t jump at the opportunity? No other traditional television platform allows a company the opportunity to present its product to more than a third of Americans in one fell swoop.


Enter Big Pharma with its latest display of benevolence: A cure for “Opioid-Induced Constipation,” or “OIC” as the advertisement so expertly vanilla-labels the malady.


Yes, it’s a widely-known fact that heroin and its legal opioid prescription cousins can cause a pretty rough case of constipation. And, of course, big Pharma couldn’t be happier to provide you with a solution to the problem it’s created. In fact, it shelled out something like 5 mil to advertise said solution during the Big Game.


The ad (embedded here) looks like your typical big-budget pharmaceutical TV production, featuring a handsome lead, and with a pleasant male voice narrating, “If you need an opioid to manage your chronic pain, you may be so constipated it feels like everyone can go except you. You may have ‘Opioid-Induced Constipation,’ or ‘OIC.'”

Pharma Guy's insight:

The ad does not mention the product name, which is Movbantik. But this animated ad does: "Opioid Baggage";  http://bit.ly/opioidpark It features a woman enjoying a day in the park with her Opioid! A screen shot from that ad made into my Gallery of Drug Advertising “Mascots”, which you can find here: http://bit.ly/pmbmascots 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pharma Guy
Scoop.it!

Merely a Flesh Wound! MannKind Swears Afrezza Not Dead

Merely a Flesh Wound! MannKind Swears Afrezza Not Dead | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

On Tuesday, MannKind announced that Sanofi had terminated the pair's commercialization deal, which will officially cease no later than July 4. As Sanofi told Bloomberg in a statement, "the product never met even modest expectations, and we do not project Afrezza reaching even the lowest patient levels anticipated."


So what's next for the California company? According to TheStreet, "MannKind is as close to financial insolvency as it can possibly be without actually declaring bankruptcy," and its shares plunged on the Sanofi news. But the company isn't giving up. As CFO Matthew Pfeffer said on a call with investors, "this is not the end of the line for Afrezza or MannKind by any means."


The one thing that doesn't need to change, according to Pfeffer? "The real world experience of Afrezza users, which is everything we hoped it would be."


Pharma Guy's insight:

Here's a billion dollar idea for MannKind: develop a version for delivery of "medical" marijuana and then lobby in support of the legalization of marijuana! Now that would make us old folks invest in your company and boost your stock price!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pharma Guy
Scoop.it!

‘Marijuana Can Be Helpful,’ Admits Surgeon General

‘Marijuana Can Be Helpful,’ Admits Surgeon General | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

Although the Justice Department under President Obama has given states some breathing room on marijuana—whether it’s used for medical or recreational purposes—the administration has held the line where federal law is concerned. In public, administration officials continue to say they think the drug should be illegal, and that they won’t consider rescheduling it even though it’s in the same category as heroin. The nominee for attorney general, Loretta Lynch, suggested at her confirmation hearing that marijuana was more dangerous than alcohol, an opinion that goes against available evidence.


But at least one administration official has finally admitted to holding a semi-sane view of the drug: the surgeon general, Vivek Murthy.


On Wednesday Dr. Murthy told CBS News that “we have some preliminary data showing that for certain medical conditions and symptoms, that marijuana can be helpful.” He also said that “we have to use that data to drive policy-making.” Imagine that! Using science to set policy!


In response, Tom Angell, the head of Marijuana Majority, said the president should “direct the attorney general to immediately begin the process of rescheduling marijuana.”


That’s probably a long way off. The federal government has previously insisted on large-scale clinical trials to prove the medical efficacy of marijuana; but stands in the way of such trials by restricting access to the drug.

Pharma Guy's insight:


Perhaps the Republicans will block the nomination of Loretta Lynch! I'm hoping to have access to medical marijuana in my old(er) age.

more...
Andrea Villarreal's curator insight, December 14, 2017 2:19 PM
Even though many say that medical marijuana is helpful many think is just another drug that falls in the same category as the heroin does when it really inst like that. it can be missed used just how any other prescriptive drug can be. therefore is not a bad choice.
Scooped by Pharma Guy
Scoop.it!

National Drug Facts Week for Teens: Hey Kids, Marijuana is not harmless. #FAIL!

National Drug Facts Week for Teens: Hey Kids, Marijuana is not harmless. #FAIL! | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it
"National Drug Facts Week (NDFW) is a health observance week for teens that aims to shatter the myths about drugs and drug abuse. Through community-based events and activities on the Web, on TV, and through contests, NIDA is working to encourage teens to get factual answers from scientific experts about drugs and drug abuse.
Pharma Guy's insight:


The first topic in the free PDF "facts" document concerns marijuana, which NIDA says can be additive (1 in 11 PEOPLE who use it become additive, says NIDA). Smoking doesn't appear until 5 pages later, alcohol not until 8 pages later ("more than 4 in 10 people who begin drinking before 15 eventually become alcoholics"), Tobacco mentioned 13 pages later, and only beginning with page 19 do we get to the really dangerous drugs - Rx medications!


The PR also starts off with marijuana: "One popular myth is that marijuana is harmless, although science tells us that marijuana use by teens may negatively affect brain development and impair school and athletic performance."


It seems to me that 90% of teens who read this will stop after seeing the information about marijuana. Shouldn't this program emphasize the most dangerous drugs first before turning off teens by dissing marijuana?


If you are interested in legalizing marijuana, read this Pharma Marketing Blog post.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pharma Guy
Scoop.it!

The New York Times Calls for Marijuana Legalization

The New York Times Calls for Marijuana Legalization | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it
The federal government should follow the growing movement in the states and repeal the ban on marijuana for both medical and recreational use.
Pharma Guy's insight:


Wow! Thank you NYT!


The "war" against marijuana has failed. 

Sir Richard Branson, founder and chairman of Virgin Group and member of the Global Commission on Drug Policy, says about the "war" on drugs, "let’s make 2013 the year we Break The Taboo." 

"If a business strategy were failing and instead of curbing a problem made it worse, would you keep it going or would you stop and consider an alternative course? Strangely, the trillion dollar war on drugs has persisted for 40 years even though it is the most dismal global policy failure of our time" (see video here).


Will Legalization of Marijuana Hurt Pharma?

"The last thing [pharma] companies want see is current product lines that are producing dependable revenue flow to be dented by legal marijuana," says Lee Jackson, author of the Daily Finance article cited above. "The big pharmaceutical firms have a lot of money to spread around, so when it comes to lobbying efforts, very few have this group's clout. One thing it wants is for marijuana to remain illegal."

more...
No comment yet.