Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News
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Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News
Pharmaguy curates and provides insights into selected drug industry news and issues.
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Drop in life expectancy an "indictment of the American health care system" and hope in new drugs by pharma industry

Drop in life expectancy an "indictment of the American health care system" and hope in new drugs by pharma industry | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

The economy may be growing and the stock market booming, but Americans are dying younger — living shorter lives than previous generations and dying earlier than their counterparts around the world.

 

It is easy to place the blame squarely on our nation’s opioid epidemic, but if we do that we miss seeing the abysmal new life expectancy data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for what they are — an indictment of the American health care system.

 

According to the CDC, the average life expectancy at birth in the U.S. fell by 0.1 years, to 78.6, in 2016, following a similar drop in 2015. This is the first time in 50 years that life expectancy has fallen for two years running. In 25 other developed countries, life expectancy in 2015 averaged 81.8 years.

Pharma Guy's insight:

From CDC: “In 2016, life expectancy at birth was 78.6 years for the total U.S. population—a decrease of 0.1 year from 78.7 in 2015 (Figure 1). For males, life expectancy changed from 76.3 in 2015 to 76.1 in 2016—a decrease of 0.2 year. For females, life expectancy remained the same at 81.1.”

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The Awful U.S. Life Expectancy Despite Awesome Dollars Spent on Healthcare!

The Awful U.S. Life Expectancy Despite Awesome Dollars Spent on Healthcare! | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

The US stands out as an outlier: the US spends far more on health than any other country, yet the life expectancy of the American population is not longer but actually shorter than in other countries that spend far less.

If we look at the time trend for each country we first notice that all countries have followed an upward trajectory – the population lives increasingly longer as health expenditure increased. But again the US stands out as the the country is following a much flatter trajectory; gains in life expectancy from additional health spending in the U.S. were much smaller than in the other high-income countries, particularly since the mid-1980s.

This development led to a large inequality between the US and other rich countries: In the US health spending per capita is often more than three-times higher than in other rich countries, yet the populations of countries with much lower health spending than the US enjoy considerably longer lives. In the most extreme case we see that Americans spend 5-times more than Chileans, but the population of Chile actually lives longer than Americans. The table at the end of this post shows the latest data for all countries so that you can study the data directly.

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rob halkes's curator insight, October 18, 2016 6:02 AM

Creating Healthcare systems is more than just about money..

Stephanie Felix's curator insight, April 2, 2017 11:43 PM

The Article that I have chosen as a part of my curation explains the link between health spending and life expectancy in the United States. The United States spends far more on health than any other country in this world, but the life expectancy of the American population is no longer but shorter than any other country that spends far less money on health. Studies have found that administrative costs in the health sector are higher in the United States. There have been price comparisons between countries and it is pointed out that these comparisons compare violence rates in the Unites States as being higher than other rich countries. One of these reasons for the underachievement is the large inequality in health spending.  

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Disparity in Life Spans of Rich vs Poor More Than Doubled Since 70s

Disparity in Life Spans of Rich vs Poor More Than Doubled Since 70s | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

Experts have long known that rich people generally live longer than poor people. But a growing body of data shows a more disturbing pattern: Despite big advances in medicine, technology and education, the longevity gap between high-income and low-income Americans has been widening sharply.

The poor are losing ground not only in income, but also in years of life, the most basic measure of well-being. In the early 1970s, a 60-year-old man in the top half of the earnings ladder could expect to live 1.2 years longer than a man of the same age in the bottom half, according to an analysis by the Social Security Administration. Fast-forward to 2001, and he could expect to live 5.8 years longer than his poorer counterpart.

New research released on Friday contains even more jarring numbers. Looking at the extreme ends of the income spectrum, economists at the Brookings Institution found that for men born in 1920, there was a six-year difference in life expectancy between the top 10 percent of earners and the bottom 10 percent. For men born in 1950, that difference had more than doubled, to 14 years.

For women, the gap grew to 13 years, from 4.7 years.

“There has been this huge spreading out,” said Gary Burtless, one of the authors of the study.

The growing chasm is alarming policy makers, and has surfaced in the presidential campaign. During the Democratic debate Thursday night, Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton expressed concern over shortening life spans for some Americans.

Pharma Guy's insight:

"One of the things that makes me most proud to be part of this industry is seeing that life expectancy has gone from 67 to 81 in a generation," said Chris Viehbacher Immediate Past Chairman of the PhRMA Board and former CEO of Sanofi. "It really shows the positive impact we've had on people and families across America." Well, not all families and not everywhere in America. For more on that see: http://bit.ly/PhRMApotemkin 

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Innovative Cancer Medicines Have Led to Increased Survival Rates & Higher Life Expectancy | PhRMA

Innovative Cancer Medicines Have Led to Increased Survival Rates & Higher Life Expectancy | PhRMA | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it
Pharma Guy's insight:


Bayer's CEO Accuses Patients of Being Ungrateful B*stards! We Cured Cancer, Dammit!


That's my takeaway from this comment by Marijn Dekkers, "outspoken" head of Bayer Pharmaceuticals, in which he not only disses patients but claims to have cured cancer!

"If you have cancer, you get a pharmaceutical product, and your cancer goes away. You're quick to call the doctor and [say] the staff at the hospital was great. But the pill that did it gets forgotten. We struggle with getting society to put value on what we do, and it becomes particularly important as we get under more pressure to develop the next pill."
This guy must be living on another planet. That planet, of course, is Planet Pharma where the drug industry rules, all cancer has been cured by the industry and where patients bow when they see a pharma CEO ride by in his open-air limo!
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The White American Mortality Gap is Growing

The White American Mortality Gap is Growing | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

New data released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) this month showed that Americans’ life expectancy fell from 2014 to 2015, from 78.9 years to 78.8 years. Though this may sound like a trivial change, declines in life expectancy are rare in the developed world outside of periods of war or national crisis. For the United States, last year’s was the first such decline since the height of the AIDS epidemic.

 

Much of the attention given to this phenomenon has understandably focused on rising rates of drug overdoses, particularly opioids. The opioid epidemic led to more than 33,000 deaths last year alone and has devastated families and communities in every corner of the country. Sadly, suicide and alcohol-related deaths also have become more common in recent years—part of a rise in what Princeton economist Anne Case has called “deaths by despair.”

 

However, drugs, alcohol, and suicide do not, on their own, explain our declining life expectancy. As the new CDC data show, these factors accounted for only about 30 percent of the overall rise in mortality from 2014 to 2015.1 Death rates also rose for eight of the top 10 causes of death—including heart disease, America’s number-one killer. “Deaths by despair” simply aren’t enough to tell the whole story.

 

This observation holds true when looking at mortality trends for the working-age white population, where the epidemic of overdoses and suicide has largely been concentrated. For this group, after decades of steady decline, all-cause mortality rates essentially flatlined after 1999 (Exhibit 1). (Mortality continued to fall for black Americans and Hispanics.) If whites’ mortality had continued to improve at its previous rate, about 100,000 deaths would have been avoided in 2015 alone.

 

Further Reading:

  • “The Awful U.S. Life Expectancy Despite Awesome Dollars Spent on Healthcare!”; http://sco.lt/4ut8JF
  • “Disparity in Life Spans of Rich vs Poor More Than Doubled Since 70s”; http://sco.lt/5KxYq9
  • “Innovative Cancer Medicines Have Led to Increased Survival Rates & Higher Life Expectancy” says PhRMA; http://sco.lt/4n1y5Z
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Life expectancy vs. health expenditure over time, 1970-2014

Life expectancy vs. health expenditure over time, 1970-2014 | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

The following graph visualizes the relationship between life expectancy and health expenditure, for a number of OECD countries across the period 1970-2014. Two points are worth mentioning. Firstly, all countries in this graph have followed an upward trajectory (life expectancy increased as health expenditure increased), but the U.S. stands out as an exception following a much flatter trajectory; gains in life expectancy from additional health spending in the U.S. were much smaller than in the other high-income countries, particularly since the mid-1980s. And secondly, the gains for all countries (except for the U.S.) were not diminishing, as in the previous graph. This suggests that there are many other factors affecting life expectancy, that are not determined by healthcare spending. Indeed, as we have pointed out before, healthcare is just one of many inputs to produce health.here to edit the content


Via Giuseppe Fattori
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Jeff French's curator insight, August 11, 2016 3:39 AM
Its not just how much you spend
Alex O. Awiti's curator insight, August 12, 2016 12:27 AM
Public investments in healthcare matter!
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Critiquing US Health Care: OECD Countries v. High-Income US States v. :ow-Income US States

Critiquing US Health Care: OECD Countries v. High-Income US States v. :ow-Income US States | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it
Opinion from JAMA — Critiquing US Health Care


Critics of US health care usually begin by noting that this country spends a much greater share of its gross domestic product (GDP) on health care than any other country but lags in life expectancy at birth. This critique implicitly (and sometimes explicitly) assumes that there should be a positive correlation between health care expenditures and life expectancy. Such an assumption is fully justified for low-income countries with minimal health care; additional care and financial resources usually have substantial favorable effects on life expectancy.


In theory, this positive relationship should continue at all levels of income, albeit with possible diminishing returns. In practice, however, many nonmedical determinants of health can vary across developed countries, possibly confounding a simple 1-to-1 relationship between health care expenditures and life expectancy. As an empirical matter, the assumption of a positive correlation is not supported by comparisons across developed countries or within the United States across states.


For instance, the scatter plot of 24 Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries and higher- and lower-income US states shows life expectancy and health care spending as a percentage of GDP in 2009.

Pharma Guy's insight:


Also see Innovative Cancer Medicines Have Led to Increased Survival Rates & Higher Life Expectancy | PhRMA

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