Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News
185.9K views | +24 today
Follow
Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News
Pharmaguy curates and provides insights into selected drug industry news and issues.
Curated by Pharma Guy
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Pharma Guy
Scoop.it!

Bill Would De-Stigmatize Vermont Docs and Allow Them to Partake of Pharma-Sponsored Free Ice Cream, Etc., at Medical Events

Bill Would De-Stigmatize Vermont Docs and Allow Them to Partake of Pharma-Sponsored Free Ice Cream, Etc., at Medical Events | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

The Vermont Senate Health and Welfare Committee has endorsed a bill designed to allow doctors who go to conferences to eat meals paid for by pharmaceutical companies.

 

The committee voted 5-0 in favor of S.45. The bill now heads to the Senate floor.

 

S.45 updates an existing Vermont law that requires pharmaceutical companies to disclose gifts they give to doctors and other health care providers.

 

The bill would drop the law’s provision that doctors who attend conferences and other large events be prohibited from consuming coffee, snacks, sit-down meals or buffets paid for by pharmaceutical companies.

 

However, doctors would still be prohibited from eating meals at events designed to promote specific drugs or devices, according to Sen. Virginia Lyons, D-Chittenden, the lead sponsor of the bill.

 

Lyons said Vermont doctors who attend conferences right now are faced with a stigma because other practitioners can eat dinners and buffets.

 

“We had all these docs and other practitioners going to conferences, and there would be a big dinner, and it would be sponsored by a pharmaceutical company (that) may not be pushing a specific drug or device …,” Lyons said.

 

“There would be signs placed outside of the dinner room at the conference that say … ‘Vermont practitioners not welcome,’” she continued. “They couldn’t come in and have the food because it was considered a gift that would influence.”

Pharma Guy's insight:

It all started with ice cream. Read “No Schering-Plough Ice Cream for You, MA VT MN Doctors!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pharma Guy
Scoop.it!

Is Vermont Governor Shumlin Misguided? Yes Says #Pharma: OIC Ad Will Stay on Air

Is Vermont Governor Shumlin  Misguided? Yes Says #Pharma: OIC Ad Will Stay on Air | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

Two drug makers are ignoring a demand from Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin to yank a television ad that he believes is a “shameful attempt” to exploit the opioid crisis.


The dispute arose last week when Shumlin released an open letter to Daiichi Sankyo and AstraZeneca after they ran an ad during the Super Bowl. The ad promoted awareness of opioid-induced constipation, a condition that can occur when someone is taking opioid painkillers.


Shumlin noted that a one-minute Super Bowl ad cost a reported $10 million — or more precisely, $5 million for each 30-second spot — and wants the drug makers to, instead, divert some of their promotional dollars toward prevention and treatment programs.


So what will the drug makers do?


A Daiichi Sankyo spokeswoman said in a statement that the drug maker acknowledges that opioid abuse is a “very serious public health” issue in the United States, but did not mention the possibility of pulling the ad. Instead, she wrote us that the company — along with AstraZeneca and five advocacy groups that also sponsored the ad — is “committed to raising awareness” about the condition.


In a letter to Shumlin, AstraZeneca wrote that “we believe our message encourages a clinically important conversation about OIC between patients and their doctors, which may also facilitate a broader discussion about safe and appropriate opioid use. While these discussions are separate and distinct, both are important for patients and their families.”


Their responses, however, did not mention pulling the ads or using advertising funds as Shumlin suggested.


“He’s way off base,” Richard Meyer, an industry consultant who writes The World of DTC Marketing blog, told us. “If he is so concerned about addiction, he needs to tighten the prescribing parameters and make it tougher for patients to become addicted.”


But another marketing expert disagreed.


“I suppose he, like many other state governors, is faced with increasing Medicaid costs and other expenditures related to opioid addiction,” said John Mack, who publishes Pharma Marketing News. “So, I don’t think he is the misguided one.”

Pharma Guy's insight:

My full reply to Silverman's inquiry ("Is Shumlin misguided?"): 


I suppose he, like many other state governors, is faced with increasing Medicaid costs and other expenditures related to opioid addiction. So, I don’t think he is the misguided one. The one who is REALLY misguided is Massachusetts Governor Charles Baker who eliminated $500,000 in funding for a program designed to curb the inappropriate prescribing of opioid drugs by physicians. Especially when police in his state (e.g., Gloucester; http://sco.lt/90L66j) are fighting drug addiction and specifically citing pharma companies as part of the problem.

more...
No comment yet.