Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News
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Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News
Pharmaguy curates and provides insights into selected drug industry news and issues.
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Oncologists Can Be Influenced By Small #Pharma Payments for Meals, Travel, Consulting

Oncologists Can Be Influenced By Small #Pharma Payments for Meals, Travel, Consulting | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

In the latest attempt to examine financial ties between physicians and drug makers, a new study finds that oncologists who received payments for meals, travel, and consulting were more likely to prescribe medicines sold by the companies who provided the largesse.

 

Specifically, the odds were 78 percent greater that oncologists would prescribe certain brand-name drugs for treating renal cell carcinoma if they had received some type of payment from one of the manufacturers. And the odds were 29 percent higher they would prescribe certain brand-name medicines for treating chronic myeloid leukemia if they had received a payment.

 

The pattern is troubling because the cancer drugs can have significant side effects and high monthly costs, according to Dr. Aaron Mitchell, a fellow in the UNC School of Medicine division of hematology and oncology and the lead author. The preliminary findings will be presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting 2017 in Chicago on Saturday.

 

The average amount of general payments made to oncologists who prescribed brand-name drugs for renal cell carcinoma was $566, and the average was $166 for those who prescribed chronic myeloid leukemia meds. Mitchell acknowledged these are small amounts that constituted little financial benefit, but said “it’s probably more of a marker about a subconscious feeling of obligation or connection.”

 

The researchers did not detect the same trend among oncologists who accepted research funding.

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Rosy Oncology Drug Outlook for Years & Years to Come

Rosy Oncology Drug Outlook for Years & Years to Come | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

The oncology landscape is evolving rapidly, driven by new science bringing treatment options for an expanded number of patients and redefining cancer as a large number of narrowly defined diseases. Most health systems are struggling to adapt and embrace this evolution, in particular the regulatory systems, diagnostic and treatment infrastructure, and financing mechanisms that are required to meet the needs of populations.

Over the past five years, 70 new oncology treatments have been launched and are being used to treat over 20 different tumor types. However, most of these drugs are not yet available in most countries, and even when they are registered, they may not be reimbursed.

The total cost of cancer therapeutics and medicines used in supportive care – measured at the ex-manufacturer price level before the application of rebates or other price concessions – reached $107 billion in 2015, representing an increase in constant dollars of 11.5% over the prior year. Not surprisingly, payers are seeking assurance of the value that result from their expenditure on these drugs and the associated services required for their appropriate use. This tension can be expected to be amplified over the next five years as a strong pipeline of clinically distinctive therapies reaches a growing number of patients around the world.

Over Twenty Tumor Types Are Being Treated With New Medicines That Have Been Launched in The Past Five Years

Over 586 molecules are in clinical development, up 63% over the past 10 years, with targeted agents making up 87% of the current pipeline.

A diverse set of over 500 companies are actively engaged in late phase oncology R&D, including most leading global companies and many newcomers.

Pharma Guy's insight:

You might also be interested in reading this article: "Obama’s Cancer ‘Moonshot’ vs the Catch-22 of Oncology"; http://sco.lt/6ixUsj 

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Ajaya Kumar Reka's curator insight, July 5, 7:31 PM

You might also be interested in reading this article: "Obama’s Cancer ‘Moonshot’ vs the Catch-22 of Oncology"; http://sco.lt/6ixUsj ;

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Oncologists Not Concerned About DTC "Over Promising" Efficacy, Says @Richmeyer

Interesting day in market research with Oncologists to talk about DTC marketing of Oncology drugs.  Here are some key topline findings:

  1. Majority say that patients are NOT asking for/about specific advertised drugs.
  2. Claims by pharma companies, in ads and in details, are fact checked online with other Oncologists and driven by data rather than brand claims.
  3. Pharma is doing very little to help them help their patients.  They want more educational materials, including “take home” information for patients receiving therapy.
  4. There is a LOT of off-label use driven by contact with colleagues.
  5. They are “not worried” about cancer drugs that seem to “over promise”.  As one doctor said “I want my patients to be optimistic rather than pessimistic when it comes to treatments”.
  6. Biggest concern is “cost of cancer drugs” and that insurer may “tie their hands” when it comes to treatments, especially off-label.
Pharma Guy's insight:

Meyer reports some results from undocumented "research" that seems to discount the viewpoint expressed by two oncologists from Deaconess Medical Center and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard University Medical School; i.e., that Cancer Drug Advertising Fosters Misinterpretation of Efficacy by Patients. Read more about that here: http://sco.lt/8Imgdd 

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Oncology Companies Can Improve the Customer Experience

Oncology Companies Can Improve the Customer Experience | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it
The oncology customer experience typically is negative and lags behind the experience that many other industries create for their customers.
Via Olivier Delannoy
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