Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News
186.1K views | +26 today
Follow
Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News
Pharmaguy curates and provides insights into selected drug industry news and issues.
Curated by Pharma Guy
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Pharma Guy
Scoop.it!

In a Blow to PhRMA, Only 9% of People in U.S. Rank Pharma as the Most Innovative Industry

In a Blow to PhRMA, Only 9% of People in U.S. Rank Pharma as the Most Innovative Industry | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it
Only 17% of consumers polled in the 2017 Klick Health Consumer Survey on Healthcare Innovation currently perceive health-related industries as being the most innovative, out of 18 industries examined. Specifically, pharmaceuticals & biotech, health & wellness, and hospital sectors lagged considerably in perceived innovation behind consumer electronics, telecommunications, and media & entertainment.

However, respondents ranked health & wellness first in terms of the industry that should be the most innovative, quickly followed by pharmaceuticals & biotech, and hospitals in the top five industries. These results suggest a desire by consumers for innovation in healthcare, even though they do not believe that healthcare-related industries are particularly innovative today.
Pharma Guy's insight:

On the bright side, Pharma does rank #4 in a list of 19 industries, most of which no one considers most innovative.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pharma Guy
Scoop.it!

AstraZeneca Scrapes the Bottom of the Rejected Drug Barrel for "New Drugs" - Innovation Redefined

AstraZeneca Scrapes the Bottom of the Rejected Drug Barrel for "New Drugs" - Innovation Redefined | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

AstraZeneca is working with outside researchers to look for untapped potential in drugs that the company has shelved, part of a broader move to improve its research-and-development output.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pharma Guy
Scoop.it!

Want a $500 K Grant? Enter J&J's World Without Disease QuickFire Challenge

At Johnson & Johnson Innovation and Janssen Research & Development, our goal is to improve the health and wellness of people around the world. To that end, we have a passionate and engaged workforce across our consumer, medical device and pharmaceutical units who are interested in finding and deploying comprehensive, end to end, integrated solutions which take into account the world in which we live today. Johnson & Johnson Innovation and Janssen Research & Development are bringing together the consumer, medical device and pharmaceutical sectors to award a prize or a series of prizes to the person or team(s) who submits the best idea, technology, or solution that will address a critical health need for the world's population.

Pharma Guy's insight:

Laudable. I know this is marketing speak, but a world without disease is as realistic as a world without war, IMHO.

 

Also read: "Johnson & Johnson Expands Its Membership in the Digital Innovation Club"; http://sco.lt/65ScEr 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pharma Guy
Scoop.it!

Johnson & Johnson Tops List of #Pharma Companies Delivering Innovative Drugs

Johnson & Johnson Tops List of #Pharma Companies Delivering Innovative Drugs | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

The sixth annual Productive Innovation Index released by IDEA Pharma today, which ranks biopharmaceutical companies by their ability to successfully bring innovations to market, sees Johnson & Johnson top the industry for the fourth year running. 


The Productive Innovation Index measures, scores and celebrates a company’s ability to deliver innovation to patients, by objectively evaluating performance data based on a rolling five year period (2010-2015), and operates on the premise: if you gave the same molecule to two different companies in early phase, which would make the best of it?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pharma Guy
Scoop.it!

A Canadian Strikes Back Against Pfizer CEO Read Regarding Who Innovated What First

A Canadian Strikes Back Against Pfizer CEO Read Regarding Who Innovated What First | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

Last week in Washington, DC, a luncheon at the National Press Club Ballroom was the scene of a unique treat, as members of the US media were on hand to sample the steak salad and crab cake sandwiches and to rake Ian Read, CEO of Pfizer Pharmaceuticals, over the coals.

 

One of the “stewards of the drug industry,” Read was on hand to defend his company’s practices (price gouging, political lobbying, etc.) and to spread the gospel of good will from Big Pharma. And to take some pot shots at Canada along the way.

 

For over an hour, Read spoke of the challenges faced by pharmaceutical companies in bringing a new drug to market, insisting that research and development are costly endeavours and that without charging the high fees they do for drugs (he’d call it citizen-funded investment in medical innovation, you may have different names for it), advances in healthcare just wouldn’t happen.

 

The messaging continued through until near the end of the Q & A when the topic of international trade agreements came up. “We didn’t support [the Trump-scuppered] Trans Pacific Partnership because it was really bad for our intellectual property,” said Read. “Most of these countries, if you look at Canada, if you look at Australia, if you look at New Zealand, all highly developed countries, all free-riding on inventions in the United States” (read “Ian Read, CEO of Pfizer, aka the “Donald Trump of Pharma,” Bashes Global “Freeloading” Off U.S.”; http://sco.lt/7TRiDZ )

 

Read drove the point home by saying, “Canada is cheaper because of [drug] ration[ing]. And Canada is cheaper because it can, because it free-rides off American innovation.”

 

The claim has been made before. The idea goes that citizens in countries with universal healthcare pay less for drugs than they do in the US because the governments of Canada, New Zealand and Australia constrain drug companies from charging the full monty for their products. Thus, the poor pharma companies have to make do with less profits in the rest of the world and consequently must rifle all the more vigorously through the pockets of American citizens in order to pay for their R&D.

 

Freeloaders, Mr. Read? Freeloaders on American innovation! I’m no Einstein, but I think you might have it a little ass backwards, dude. Do you like that smart phone in your pocket, Mr. American businessman? I’d say you owe us and the folks at BlackBerry for that one. The old-fashioned telephone, too, you might remember, was made by a Canadian/Scotsman.

 

Thomas Edison may get the credit for the light bulb, Mr. Read, but he bought the patent from a couple of Canadians by the name of Woodward and Evans. More co-opting of Canadian ingenuity, the inventor of the AM radio broadcast was Reginald Fessenden, another Canadian trying to make a living down in the States.

Who invented the Java programming language? James Gosling from Calgary. Who invented both the alkaline and lithium batteries? Chemical engineer Lewis Urry from little Pontypool, Ontario. IMAX technology? A Canadian team.

 

Yes, Mr. Read, some of our inventions may seem a bit pedestrian to you big city types. The paint roller, for one, and instant mashed potatoes. Five pin bowling. But no one can say we aren’t crafty with our surroundings, to wit, the snowblower, the ski-doo, instant replay and the hockey mask.

 

Finally, allow me to step into your sandbox, Mr. Pfizer, and say one word: insulin.

 

Now, with that fully out of our systems, let us return to the broader thesis that research and development carried out by pharmaceutical companies requires proper financial investment by countries and their drug-consuming, over-a-barrel citizens.

 

“Overall, I think it’s fair to say that we’re being responsible when it comes to the pricing of our medicines,” said Read. “We’re producing great value for society and simultaneously taking large financial risks due to the uncertainty of the drug.”

 

In any given year, companies like Pfizer spend more on sales and marketing of their drugs than on research and development. From 2013, for example, Pfizer spent $6.6 billion on R&D and $11.4 billion on sales and marketing. The same year, Johnson & Johnson spent $8.2 billion on R&D and $17.5 billion on marketing.

 

That $6.6 billion spent on R&D seems a lot less impressive when stacked up against $22 billion in profit — and, consequently, the whole argument that high drug costs are necessary for innovation seems a whole lot of nonsense…

 

And yet there he was, blaming Canada and calling it “commercial blackmail” when governments (“monopoly-purchasing governments,” he says) have the audacity to set prices for his drugs. There he was chastising Canada and attacking our government’s utter gall in considering its citizens’ interests, their health and their livelihoods when deciding on drug prices. And calling us a country of innovation freeloaders, to boot!

Before pondering that some more, I think I’ll zip up the ol’ parka, jump on my snowmobile and head to the bar for a Bloody Caesar. Maybe get a butter tart, too.

Pharma Guy's insight:

You go Canada! BTW, you forgot to include Trailer Park Boys!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pharma Guy
Scoop.it!

JNJ Innovation Aims to Develop Breakthrough Medical Device Technologies

JNJ Innovation Aims to Develop Breakthrough Medical Device Technologies | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

Johnson & Johnson Innovation LLC (JJI) today announced the creation of the Center for Device Innovation at Texas Medical Center (CDI @ TMC), a broad, new collaboration between JJI and TMC that aims to accelerate end-to-end development of breakthrough medical devices. This expands on JJI’s collaboration with TMC established earlier this year with the opening of JLABS @ TMC, combining the resources of the world’s largest medical complex with the capabilities of the Johnson & Johnson Medical Devices Companies*, to advance the health and well-being of people around the globe.

 

The CDI @ TMC will include multiple components that will accelerate the development of new medical technologies from concept through commercialization, including a new medical device engineering studio housed at the TMC Innovation Institute. This state-of-the-art “maker space” will be home to R&D staff of the Johnson & Johnson Medical Devices Companies and will be used to accelerate both select internal projects and strategically aligned ventures of JJI partner companies.

Pharma Guy's insight:

Related article: “Johnson & Johnson Expands Its Membership in the Digital Innovation Club”; http://sco.lt/65ScEr

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pharma Guy
Scoop.it!

Sometimes #Pharma "Innovation" Doesn't Make Good Business Sense: Merck/Diabetes Case Study

Sometimes #Pharma "Innovation" Doesn't Make Good Business Sense: Merck/Diabetes Case Study | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

Merck & Co will no longer file for approval of once-weekly diabetes drug omarigliptin in the US or Europe.


The company said in a statement that the decision did not relate to any safety or efficacy issues with the DPP-4 inhibitor, which might suggest it is not confident that the market is prepared to pay a premium for a weekly compared to a once-daily drug such as Merck's own Januvia (sitagliptin) product.


There are thought to be other issues with once-weekly administration of DPP-4 inhibitors. While they are intended to reduce the burden of taking pills by diabetics and improve compliance, patients can rarely benefit from drug-free days as those on DPP-4 inhibitors often also take metformin, which must be dosed every day.


Some clinicians argue that it is easier for patients to keep track of dosing two drugs side by side rather than mixing weekly and daily doses.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pharma Guy from Digital Disruption in Pharma
Scoop.it!

#Pharma Can't "Triage" All the Digital Innovation Ideas Coming Through Their Doors?

  • Pharmaceutical executives are flooded with digital health opportunities: Many startups and established companies are coming to drug firms with a range of innovations, from mobile health solutions to smart pills. Executives and leaders at these firms are having trouble triaging these innovations to determine which ones will meet key organizational, business and health goals.
  • Drug firms are starting to turn to companies with multiple products and services for help: For example, earlier this year Qualcomm announced a number of deals with pharmaceutical companies to provide key digital health services and support technology innovations via venture funding.
  • Companies are working hard to drive digital health innovation from within: A number of firms have created internal innovation groups that are responsible for locating, developing and supporting the integration of digital health technologies into their operations. There is a special need for this work in developing countries like Brazil and China. 


Overall, the digital health innovation picture in Big Pharma is a lot brighter than the headlines would have you believe. But, there’s clearly a lot more work to be done. 

more...
No comment yet.