Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News
186.0K views | +1 today
Follow
Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News
Pharmaguy curates and provides insights into selected drug industry news and issues.
Curated by Pharma Guy
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Pharma Guy
Scoop.it!

Google Developing Pill That Searches for Cancer and Heart Disease

Google Developing Pill That Searches for Cancer and Heart Disease | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it
Google may be best known for its search engine, but it also employs a quiet "X" team dedicated to making revolutionary discoveries.


About 2,000 nanoparticles can fit inside a red blood cell. That diminutive size interests medical researchers, who believe these could deliver cellular-level treatments. To that end, Google X researchers are working on a swallowable pill full of custom nanoparticles that could detect diseases. A wristband would scan the nanoparticles once a day with light and radio waves to help diagnose health conditions in the early stages.


Lead researcher and molecular biologist Dr. Andrew Conrad told the BBC: "Nanoparticles ... give you the ability to explore the body at a molecular and cellular level. What we are trying to do is change medicine from reactive and transactional to proactive and preventative." 


Theoretically, the nanoparticles could attach to cancerous cells or find evidence of fatty plaque in arteries. They could even be designed to change colors to indicate high levels of potassium, an indicator of kidney disease.

Pharma Guy's insight:


It's kind of like Google's street map cars for your body.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pharma Guy
Scoop.it!

Why Google and Novartis are teaming up

Why Google and Novartis are teaming up | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it
First there was Google Glass. Now, there might be Google contact lenses.


They're working on smart lenses that will be able to monitor blood sugar levels for diabetics through the natural tears in our eyes.  


Google and Novartis also say they’re developing another lens that can auto-focus the eye. It could help with reading, because as the eye ages, it’s harder to see things up close.   


The two companies complement each other pretty well: Google doesn’t need any money from Novartis, while Novartis can help Google navigate the clinical and regulatory side of things.


“They need more the expertise in terms of running clinical trials, getting approval from the FDA, and then marketing after approval,” says John Mack, who follows the pharmaceutical industry as publisher of "Pharma Marketing News."

Pharma Guy's insight:


Just to clarify: Yes, FDA went after pharma companies because of paid Google ads that did not contain relevant risk info and yes, Google encouraged these kinds of ads (google "Girl from Google" to learn more about that). But, as I mentioned to Nancy on the phone (but not quoted here), the real reason Google DEFINITELY can use an FDA go-between is because it was caught in an FDA sting operation soliciting ads from illegal online pharmacies despite its own policy not to accept such ads. FDA posed as an illegal pharmacy in the sting operation. For more on that, read "How FDA, in Cahoots with DOJ, Brought Google Down

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pharma Guy
Scoop.it!

"Heavy regulation makes healthcare a painful business," Says Google's Brin

"Heavy regulation makes healthcare a painful business," Says Google's Brin | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

The heavily regulated healthcare technology environment makes it a difficult business to pursue, according to Google's two co-founders, but they remain entranced by its possibilities.


"Generally, health is just so heavily regulated. It's just a painful business to be in," Sergey Brin told technology venture capitalist Vinod Khosla, adding: "I think the regulatory burden in the US is so high that think it would dissuade a lot of entrepreneurs.

Pharma Guy's insight:


But Brin said he was very excited about Google's glucose reading contact lenses, which "should be coming along pretty well".


I'm not surprised by Brin's comments. Google and the Brin family (including the Mrs. - Anne Wojcicki) have had run-ins with the FDA.  Google, for example, settled a U.S. criminal investigation into allegations it made hundreds of millions of dollars by accepting ads from online pharmacies that break U.S. laws (see "How FDA, in Cahoots with DOJ, Brought Google Down"). That's a serious felonious offense, yet nobody from Google went to jail!


And Mrs. Brin was caught trying to sell a genetic test kit with unproven accuracy. She just decided to ignore all of FDA's many inquiries until FDA had no choice but to shut down her business, at least temporarily (see "FDA Orders 23andMe to Immediately Discontinue Marketing "Spit for Cancer" Kit"). Even then, she remained defiant to the point where one wonders if wealth gives her the feeling of superiority uber alles. Nowadays, however, she is greasing the wheels with her wealth to get the FDA more in line with her business plan. Now, that wasn't so painful, Anne, was it?


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pharma Guy
Scoop.it!

Technology Companies Use CrowdSourced Big Data to Help Develop New Drugs

Technology Companies Use CrowdSourced Big Data to Help Develop New Drugs | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

23andMe's original business model may have been thwarted by the feds, but that isn't stopping the company from trying new ways to generate revenue. Its latest idea could be a lucrative one: invent new drugs.


23andMe is sitting on a mountain of genetic data culled from the more than 800,000 people who took its genetic tests before they were pulled from the market. The idea here is to mine that massive data set for as-yet-unseen insights, which could informpharmaceutical research. The company intends to then use those insights to create entirely new drugs.


The move would be a huge shift for the company, which started out by offering $99 DNA testing kits that allowed consumers to take a closer look at their genetic profiles and better understand their overall health. That is, until November 2013, when theU.S. Food and Drug Administration sent a letter asking 23andMe to stop selling its saliva collection kits.


Pharmaceutical research is also an area that's ripe for disruption, and 23andMe isn't the only tech company eyeing that opportunity. Flexing the unique potential of its own computing resources, Google is now using large-scale . And the power of big data for medical research isn't lost on Apple, which just announced its crowdsourced research framework ResearchKit on Monday.

Pharma Guy's insight:


Seems like the pharma industry has been caught napping. Technology companies are leading the way in using big data to advance medical research. It's not just data from DNA kits that technology companies like Google and Apple are collecting - it's all kinds of health data gleaned from from Web searches and wearable devices (e.g., Apple Watch). BTW, Google Glass isn't one of the wearables that collect real world health data on a daily basis from millions of people. That was a mistake on Google's part in terms of creating new business. Apple is cornering that market with the Apple Watch.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pharma Guy
Scoop.it!

Novartis buys rights to Google's 'smart lens' technology

Novartis buys rights to Google's 'smart lens' technology | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

Novartis has licensed Google's new 'smart lens' technology in a deal that will see its eye health unit Alcon work with the technology company develop new types of contact lenses. 


The technology combines non-invasive sensors, microchips and other miniaturised electronics which are so small they resemble bits of glitter embedded within contact lenses.  


Google revealed earlier this year it was testing smart contact lens that can measure diabetes patients' glucose levels via their tears and connect wirelessly with a mobile device to store this information.  


Applying the minimally invasive technology within the diabetes arena to reduce the burden of regular blood glucose tests is one of the key areas of interest for Novartis in its new deal with Google.  


The other is to help people with presbyopia – age-related long-sightedness that makes it more difficult to focus on objects that are near.  

Novartis hopes people with presbyopia who can no longer read without glasses could benefit from a smart lens, either in the form of an accommodative contact lens or an intraocular lens, to help restore the eye's natural autofocus as part of refractive cataract treatment.  

Pharma Guy's insight:


The agreement, which remains subject to anti-trust approvals, would also allow Google to avoid having to deal with some of the "painful regulation" issues imposed by FDA.


Read: "Heavy regulation makes healthcare a painful business," Says Google's Brin

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pharma Guy
Scoop.it!

Has Gilead's Director of Regulatory Affairs Been Hiding Under a Rock Since 2009? Will He Be Fired or Praised?

Has Gilead's Director of Regulatory Affairs Been Hiding Under a Rock Since 2009? Will He Be Fired or Praised? | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

At the end of June, the FDA sent a Notice of Violation (NOV) letter to Naumann Chaudry, Director, Regulatory Affairs Advertising and Promotion at Gilead Sciences, citing a sponsored link on Google for VIREAD (you can find the letter here).


Unless Dr. Chaudry (he has a PharmD degree) has been hiding under a "regulatory rock" since 2009, it's difficult to imagine that he would have approved such an ad. Because as WE all know, FDA views such ads, which include the drug brand name AND indication but no fair balance safety information, as violative of the FD&C Act.

Anyone, such as Dr. Chaudry, who is a regulatory authority -- he's worked in a regulatory capacity for several pharma companies since 2004 -- should be aware of FDA's "received precedent" on this type of ad (i.e, 14 warning letters issued in April 2009).

VIREAD is associated with serious risks and includes a black box warning. To advertise such a drug without providing any mention of such risk is unconscionable.

But there are even more serious problems with this ad, that, IMHO, should get Dr. Chaudry in hot water with Gilead's CEO and perhaps fired!

Pharma Guy's insight:


What do you think? Should Dr. Chaudry be fired?

more...
No comment yet.