Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News
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Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News
Pharmaguy curates and provides insights into selected drug industry news and issues.
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Diabetes Reality Show is in Reality a Vehicle for Proselytizing a Self-help Scam, a Last-Ditch Marketing Gambit, and an Running Ad for a Luxury Resort

Diabetes Reality Show is in Reality a Vehicle for Proselytizing a Self-help Scam, a Last-Ditch Marketing Gambit, and an Running Ad for a Luxury Resort | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

The man who boasts of changing the face of diabetes spreads his arms out wide, like the Christ the Redeemer statue, but in neon orange shorts and bare feet. He looks earnestly into the rolling camera.

“Welcome to ‘Reversed,’” he intones. Seated behind him are four of his disciples: Americans with type 2 diabetes who’ve flown to this tropical beach town to participate in a reality TV show marketed as a momentous opportunity to restore their health. Over eight days, they’ll learn to exercise and eat right and bare their struggles in cathartic therapy sessions.

Their host, Charles Mattocks, is a smooth-talking, fast-moving entrepreneur, who has leveraged his family fame (his uncle was Bob Marley) and his own medical history (he uses diet and exercise, not insulin, to manage his diabetes) to set himself up as a guru to diabetics everywhere.

In an age where nearly 1 in 10 Americans has diabetes, a disease that can bring a lifetime of painful complications, patients are often desperate for miraculous turnarounds — and there’s a booming trade in supplements, diets, and self-help books that promise answers. Now, there’s a TV show, too.

But “Reversed” is unlikely to prove anyone’s salvation.

The show, which will begin airing next month on cable, is at once a vehicle for Mattocks to proselytize his gospel of self-help, a marketing gambit by a pharma company that’s running out of money, and a season-long advertisement for a luxury getaway at the sparkling resort where it was filmed.

 

Further Reading:

  • “Don't Have Much of a Marketing Budget? Mannkind Sponsors Diabetes Reality TV Show in Jamaica”; http://sco.lt/8UmbOz
  • “Merely a Flesh Wound! MannKind Swears Afrezza Not Dead”; http://sco.lt/7lCKOX 
  • “Sanofi's DTC ROI for Afrezza: Lost 53 Cents for Every $1 Spent!”; http://sco.lt/7Tz9eL 
  • “#Pharma Disease Awareness Marketing Infiltrates Soap Operas Like General Hospital”; http://sco.lt/88Gkwz 
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Patient Advocacy Groups with Funding & Form Letter from @PhRMA Oppose Nevada Legislation

Patient Advocacy Groups with Funding & Form Letter from @PhRMA Oppose Nevada Legislation | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

Health care nonprofits backed by the pharmaceutical industry have inundated Democratic Sen. Yvanna Cancela’s inbox over the last couple of days as discussions on a major piece of legislation she sponsored continue behind the scenes.

 

Since Friday, seven groups have sent similar letters addressed generally to Nevada state senators asking them to oppose a polarizing pharmaceutical bill, SB265. All of the groups have taken money from either PhRMA, the trade association representing pharmaceutical companies in the United States and the driving force behind the opposition to the bill, or directly from pharmaceutical companies themselves.

 

Four of the seven organizations received grant funding directly from PhRMA in recent years including:

 

  • RetireSafe, a nationwide senior advocacy organization, received a $25,000 grant in 2014
  • The Epilepsy Foundation received a $25,000 grant in 2014
  • Caregivers Voices United’s affiliate Caregivers Action Network, a family caregiver organization, received $315,000 from PhRMA as a general contribution and funding to help with an event in 2014
  • National Council of Asian Pacific Islander Physicians received two $10,000 grants in 2013 and 2014

 

Many of the organizations also took money from pharmaceutical companies in 2016, including Pfizer and Sanofi, both which have registered lobbyists this session. The local nonprofit Lupus of Nevada, Inc. has also been encouraging people on Facebook to contact their legislators about the bill and provides them with a form letter, of which Cancela says she has received many copies.

 

The legislation, which Cancela introduced in February, would put price controls on diabetes medication, require pharmaceutical sales representatives to be licensed and annually report their activities and mandate disclosure of any pharmaceutical-related contributions by nonprofits in the healthcare sector.

 

The letters, which in some portions use nearly identical language, argue that SB265 could threaten access to medications by causing stockpiling in response to the required 90-day notice ahead of certain price increases, will help pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs) and insurance companies instead of patients and require nonprofits to disclose certain information about contributions they receive from pharmaceutical companies that is already publicly available — similar arguments proffered by the pharmaceutical industry in opposition to the bill.

 

Further Reading:

  • “Pharma Turning Patients With Rare Diseases Into D.C. Lobbyists”; http://sco.lt/6wBAp7 
  • “93% of Patient Advocacy Groups Included in FDA Funding Discussions Receive $ from Pharma”; http://sco.lt/8jkvFh 
  • “The Yin Yang of Patient Advocate Groups and the Pharma Industry”; http://sco.lt/6400R7 
  • “More Than Two-thirds of Patient Advocacy Groups Receive Industry Funding”; http://sco.lt/6Ftgzh 
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Bernie Sanders Calls Lilly & Novo #pharma a"Greedy" for Raising Prices of Insulin Drugs

Bernie Sanders Calls Lilly & Novo #pharma a"Greedy" for Raising Prices of Insulin Drugs | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

Despite his defeat in the primary, popular Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders continues to lend his star power to the principals of the political revolution, taking aim Tuesday at a pharmaceutical company that raised the price of a life-saving insulin drug—and Wall Street is taking notice.

Tuesday morning, Sanders criticized pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly, which raised the price of its insulin drug Homolog (sic) by 700 percent in 20 years when adjusted for inflation.

In a tweet to his 2.7 million Twitter followers, the Vermont Senator posted a Washington Post graph showing the cost of Homolog has risen from $21 to $255 since 1996. Sanders blamed “the drug industry’s greed” for profiting off those in need.

Pharma Guy's insight:

Is Bernie short-selling the stock of pharma companies he criticizes?

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Johnson & Johnson Warns Diabetes Patients That Its Insulin Pump Has a Bug That May Cause It to Be Hacked to Deliver a Fatal Dose! Yikes!

Johnson & Johnson Warns Diabetes Patients That Its Insulin Pump Has a Bug That May Cause It to Be Hacked to Deliver a Fatal Dose! Yikes! | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

A hacker could potentially exploit to overdose diabetic patients with insulin.


Johnson & Johnson is telling patients that it has learned of a cyber security bug in one of its insulin pumps that a hacker could exploit to overdose diabetic patients with insulin, though it describes the hacking risk as low.

Medical device experts said they believe it was the first time a manufacturer had issued such a warning to patients about a cyber vulnerability, a hot topic in the industry following revelations last month about possible vulnerabilities in pacemakers and defibrillators.

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Novo Nordisk and Indy Driver Charlie Kimball: Perhaps the Longest Lasting Celebrity-Pharma Partnership!

Novo Nordisk and Indy Driver Charlie Kimball: Perhaps the Longest Lasting Celebrity-Pharma Partnership! | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

Every racecar driver has sponsors. But not every driver depends on its car sponsor the way Charlie Kimball does: He has type 1 diabetes and uses Novo Nordisk ($NVO) meds daily. And not every sponsor gets the articulate marketing backup that Kimball provides.

 

Last weekend, Kimball finished his 100th race in the Novo Nordisk IndyCar with no signs of slowing down the successful partnership.

 

Kimball first met with Novo Nordisk in 2008, introduced by his endocrinologist a year after finding out at that he had Type 1 diabetes. He was already using Novo treatments, and so his doctor thought the pharma might be interested in the young race car driver's story. The company was. Novo Nordisk and Kimball struck a partnership in 2009, starting with the brand on his racing suit and a few speaking engagements.

 

Novo first signed on as Kimball's primary car sponsor in 2011 under the Chip Ganassi Racing team. While details of that deal aren't public, Bloomberg estimates that the cost of a primary Indy car sponsorship starts at $5 million to $9 million for the side pod, another $1 million to $2 million for the front wind and $300,000-$900,000 for the cockpit and tail.

 

But the team-up soon expanded beyond paint colors and car logos. Impressed with Kimball's combination of driving grit and genuine dedication to fans and diabetes awareness, Novo rolled out the “Race With Insulin” education campaign in 2013 [This is incorrect. Pharmaguy blogged about the @racewithinsulin campaign back in 2009. See here; http://bit.ly/3SM9wL Also, listen to this 2009 interview: “Novo Nordisk's Race With Insulin Campaign: It's Not Just About Twitter”; http://sco.lt/8GXLJh ]. That same year, Kimball became the first driver with Type 1 diabetes to win a major IndyCar race.

 

Celebrity endorsements are not always so cohesive and effective. Brands can run into issues that cause celebs to disavow them, as Sarah Jessica Parker recently did with Mylan's EpiPen amid the company's pricing debacle. Other times, as Novo knows, celebrities' behavior can cause a rift: The Danish drugmaker faced negative publicity and a split with Paula Deen after she admitted to using racist language [read “Should Novo Nordisk Dump Deen?; http://bit.ly/10gwOFW - They did!].

 

Meanwhile, November is Diabetes Awareness Month, coming just after the season ends, and Kimball will spend the month traveling with Novo Nordisk and other ambassadors, including basketball player Dominque Wilkins, country music singer RaeLynn, actor Ben Vereen and rapper Rev Run, sharing their stories at speaking engagements and events.  

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Everywoman Betty and Everyman Freddy are Tresiba Ready! Until Side Effects in AD Pop Up!

Everywoman Betty and Everyman Freddy are Tresiba Ready! Until Side Effects in AD Pop Up! | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

After setting out to get their blood sugar under control and trim their A1C, Betty the waitress, Freddy the barber and Eddy the delivery man all decide that they're Tresiba-ready.

 

View the ad here and you too will get the refrain stuck in your head!

Pharma Guy's insight:

I hate the "Trisiba Ready" refrain sung in the background over and over again! I can't get it out of my head! Damn!

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As Blockbuster Drugs Near Lifecycle End, #Pharma TV Ad Spending Rises

As Blockbuster Drugs Near Lifecycle End, #Pharma TV Ad Spending Rises | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

The list of top pharma TV spenders for April featured blockbusters and cliffhangers. The top three spenders Lyrica, Humira and Latuda, in fact, have been major blockbusters for their manufacturers, but are also facing sooner-rather-than-later patent expirations.

 

No. 1 Pfizer’s pain and seizure drug Lyrica spent almost $26 million for the month, easily doubling its ad spend from the previous month and unseating AbbVie's Humira from its top-spender position, according to real time TV tracker iSpot.tv.

 

Pfizer's top seller, Lyrica has been in the news as it tries to fight off generics by defending its pain-indication patent. Pfizer lost that battle in the U.K., where generics have since made their debut, but in the U.S., a patent decision blocks generics until 2018. The Lyrica TV spot that garnered the most spending was Coach, a new creative execution about a female softball coach focused on fibromyalgia pain.

 

Up next on the April TV spender list was Humira, which until now has held the top spot every month in 2016. The AbbVie anti-inflammatory brand split $24 million on TV ads among its three indications for arthritis, Crohn’s disease and colitis, and psoriasis, according to iSpot’s data. Humira’s main patent expires this year; but AbbVie remains confident that it won't face biosimilars in the immediate future. The company sees Humira sales – which make up more than half of its revenue – increasing through 2018, with only small decreases in the following two years.

 

The No. 3 spender, Sunovion’s anti-psychotic Latuda, also faces a patent expiration this year, and it dropped more than $17 million on TV ads in April. A new ad launched last month continues its ongoing story of bipolar depression sufferer Amy, but told through the perspective of her husband Scott.

 

Three diabetes drugs also made April’s top 10 – AstraZeneca’s Farxiga, Novo Nordisk’s Victoza and Sanofi’s Toujeo – as competition remains fierce in that disease.

 

Overall spending rebounded among the top 10, totaling $138.6 million in April for a 30% increase over the $108 million spent in March.

Pharma Guy's insight:

For a more in-depth analysis, read "TV DTC Advertising Is Not Dead Yet!"; http://bit.ly/pmn150201p 

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PhRMA Exploits, er, Features 5-Year-Old with Diabetes in "Hope" Ad Campaign.

PhRMA Exploits, er, Features 5-Year-Old with Diabetes in "Hope" Ad Campaign. | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

Pharma's image has been sagging lately, so the leading U.S. trade group is trying for a facelift. The Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) is kicking off a new ad campaign aimed at polishing up pharma's tarnished rep.


The campaign, called "From Hope to Cures," is a "several million dollar" effort that features the themes "hope," "courage," "solvable" and "achievable" to tell the story of fighting serious diseases.


The first ad features two patients, 5-year-old Rhys, who has Type 1 diabetes and Jamie, a woman living with a rare blood cancer. A researcher named Jennifer who is wearing goggles and a Merck lab coat also makes an appearance.


At the beginning of the ad, Jennifer stands in front of a white board with the word "unsolvable" scrawled across the middle. Jamie stands on the beach with the word "discourage" written in the sand," and Rhys looks at the word "hopeless" spelled out in blue building blocks on the living room floor.


Jennifer then erases the white board, saying, "thanks to new treatments…," and Jamie and Rhys chime in "we're fighting back." Jamie wipes out the words in the sand and Rhys knocks down the blocks. "Today, more than 7,000 new medicines are being developed around the world," Jennifer says as the does lab work. "Every day brings us closer to a cure," Jennifer says at the end of the ad, with the word "solvable" written behind her on the white board. Jamie stands by the word "courage" in the sand and Rhys sits by the word "hope" spelled out in blocks.


Pharma Guy's insight:

This is part of PhRMA's pledge to spend several million dollars this year, and 10% more than in 2015, on digital, radio and print ads that emphasize the industry’s role in developing new drugs and advancing medical science. It also plans to spend more money lobbying and donated to political campaigns. For more on that, read "#Pharma Ramps Up Ads & Lobbying to Fend Off Rx Pricing Regulation"; http://sco.lt/5m9c9J 

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Sanofi to Terminate US Diabetes (?) Employees as Part of "Sizable" Cut

Sanofi to Terminate US Diabetes (?) Employees as Part of "Sizable" Cut | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it
Layoffs are expected at Sanofi, with most of the cuts probably happening in the United States.


Chris Viehbacher was sacked amid unusually public boardroom tumult, notably a conflict with Sanofi chairman Serge Weinberg. His departure followed an unexpected strategic setback as the drug maker dialed back sales forecasts for its all-important diabetes business, which is about 21 percent of overall sales.


Meanwhile, a follow-on product is not showing signs of generating needed replacement revenue and a biosimilar version of Lantus will become available at the end of this year. And a deal to sell the MannKind inhaled insulin product known as Afrezza was just ended due to terrible sales.


“They’re facing a very difficult situation,” said David Kliff of Diabetic Investor, who expects the cuts to be significant. “Their top diabetes product is going away and replacement products are not doing well. They have no choice but to reorganize.”


Pharma Guy's insight:

I hope this does not include any of the Digitally Savvy Women Pioneers in my list: http://bit.ly/dswpharma 

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Invokana TV Ad Makes Diabetes Fun... If You Enjoy Myriad Side Effects!

Invokana TV Ad Makes Diabetes Fun... If You Enjoy Myriad Side Effects! | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

Question: What do obese, middle-aged and older, mute Americans with Type II diabetes do for fun?


Answer: At least according to this TV commercial for Invokana, they wander around waiting for frisbees with alluring images to glide down from the sky, then clutch the discs tight to change their lives.


I was struck by this 2-minute ad, which I saw a couple times while at the gym. The group really does personify the obesity and Type II diabetes statistics you read about. The ad makes the pill sound quite promising –explaining how great it is for glucose control and adding that it can even help patients lose weight.


The actors keep enjoying new frisbees right through the extensive discussion of side effects.

Pharma Guy's insight:

This is an opinion piece by David E. Williams (@HealthBizBlog) who tweeted me the link and said: "This ad almost makes it seem like fun to be a middle aged, chubby person with unfashionable clothing and Type II diabetes. Where can I get one of those frisbees for my backpack?" 


I watched the 2-minute ad and came away with a different impression - Yikes! The potential side effects are awful and about 55 seconds of the ad is devoted to telling you about these side effects. During most of that portion of the ad, the actors look like they are having fun, which doesn't resonate with the serious side effects being mentioned in the voice over!

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Are Readily-Prescribed ED Drugs Hiding Underlying Diabetes?

Anyone who watches TV knows that men with erectile dysfunction can try solving the problem by taking a pill. But they also need to be screened for diabetes, a new study suggests.


Doctors have long known that erectile dysfunction in midlife can be an early indicator of cardiovascular disease. Now a new analysis reports that middle-aged men with erectile dysfunction are at more than double the risk of having undiagnosed diabetes, which is itself a risk factor for heart disease, when compared with similar men who don’t have erectile problems.


Researchers analyzed data from men who participated in theNational Health and Nutrition Examination Survey during 2001-2004, and found that among those aged 40 to 59 who said they were “never” or only “sometimes” able to maintain an erection, one in 10 had undiagnosed Type 2 diabetes. Among men without erectile problems, by comparison, the rate was one in 50.


Though researchers found a correlation between erectile dysfunction and undiagnosed high blood pressure, it was not statistically significant; and men with erectile dysfunction were not at increased risk for having undiagnosed high cholesterol. The report was published in Annals of Family Medicine.


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▶ Boehringer Ingelheim and Eli Lilly and Company Diabetes Awareness Video - YouTube

Diabetes is a common medical condition affecting 382 million people today; and that number is on the rise. Without careful management, diabetes can lead to s...
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FDA Warns About Serious Side Effects of Diabetes Drugs: Invokana & Jardiance

FDA Warns About Serious Side Effects of Diabetes Drugs: Invokana & Jardiance | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

The US FDA has warned that drugs in the SGLT2 inhibitor class of diabetes therapies can cause a potentially serious side effect.


The class - which includes widely used products such as Invokana (canagliflozin) from Johnson & Johnson, Eli Lilly/Boehringer Ingelheim's Jardiance (empagliflozin) and AstraZeneca's Farxiga (canagliflozin) - has been linked to high levels of blood acids that could require hospitalisation.


The US regulator said doctors and patients should pay close attention for any signs of the condition - known as ketoacidosis - such as "difficulty breathing, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, confusion, and unusual fatigue or sleepiness."

Pharma Guy's insight:


Diabetes drugs have been on the FDA's safety watch list for years, in part because they are used by such as high number of people but also on the back of a series of health scares. 


Most recently, the agency recommended changes to the labelling of two products in another diabetes drug class, the DPP4 inhibitors - after data suggested a link to cardiovascular complications. 

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Don't Have Much of a Marketing Budget? Mannkind Sponsors Diabetes Reality TV Show in Jamaica

Don't Have Much of a Marketing Budget? Mannkind Sponsors Diabetes Reality TV Show in Jamaica | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

The man who boasts of changing the face of diabetes spreads his arms out wide, like the Christ the Redeemer statue, but in neon orange shorts and bare feet. He looks earnestly into the rolling camera.

 

“Welcome to ‘Reversed,’” he intones. Seated behind him are four of his disciples: Americans with type 2 diabetes who’ve flown to this tropical beach town to participate in a reality TV show marketed as a momentous opportunity to restore their health. Over eight days, they’ll learn to exercise and eat right and bare their struggles in cathartic therapy sessions.

 

Their host, Charles Mattocks, is a smooth-talking, fast-moving entrepreneur, who has leveraged his family fame (his uncle was Bob Marley) and his own medical history (he uses diet and exercise, not insulin, to manage his diabetes) to set himself up as a guru to diabetics everywhere.

 

In an age where nearly 1 in 10 Americans has diabetes, a disease that can bring a lifetime of painful complications, patients are often desperate for miraculous turnarounds — and there’s a booming trade in supplements, diets, and self-help books that promise answers. Now, there’s a TV show, too.

 

The debut 10-episode season airs this summer on Discovery Life, a cable channel that specializes in medical programming starring real people, like “The Boy With No Brain” and “Untold Stories of the ER.” Last year it drew an average of 88,000 viewers a night during prime time, according to Valeria Almada, a spokeswoman for the channel. That ranks around 97th among networks, by one recent estimate of viewership.

 

The show’s primary sponsor is MannKind, an insulin manufacturer that’s in bad financial shape. Neither the show nor the company would say how much the sponsorship cost, but MannKind will get advertising spots for its struggling insulin inhaler, Afrezza, during commercial breaks and perhaps a brief mention of the product on the show itself.

 

The drug manufacturer MannKind has been burning through millions of dollars each month. It only has 3,000 patients taking its sole product, an inhalable form of insulin. It recently said it doesn’t have enough cash to get to the end of this year.

 

So why, then, is the company sponsoring a reality TV show filmed here in this tropical resort town?

 

“We don’t have a ton of cash. As a small company who’s building, you gotta think differently and you gotta be more creative,” said Michael Castagna, who was promoted last week to CEO of MannKind. He won’t give specific numbers but said he’s spending less than the annual cost of keeping a typical employee on staff to sponsor the TV show. It’s a lot less, he said, than other companies spend to snag air time on, say, Monday Night Football or the evening news. And he’s hoping to target a very specific audience: people with diabetes — who are, after all, likely to be in the market for insulin.

 

Further Reading:

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Google Celebrates Discovery of Insulin to Treat Diabetes. First Search Result -> High Prices!

Google Celebrates Discovery of Insulin to Treat Diabetes. First Search Result -> High Prices! | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

Millions of people around the world suffer from diabetes, but until the 1920s there was no treatment for it.

 

Sir Frederick Banting was a Canadian scientist whose pioneering work using insulin to treat diabetes earned him the Nobel prize. He only lived to be 49 but on November 14 - what would have been his 125th birthday - Google has celebrated him with a commemorative Doodle.

 

November 14 is also World Diabetes Day.

Pharma Guy's insight:

Also read “Sanofi & Novo Nordisk Raise Diabetes Drug Prices in "Lockstep" With One Another”; http://sco.lt/7sltK5 and “Why Is Insulin So Expensive In The U.S.?”; http://sco.lt/9K9FJJ and “Soaring Insulin Prices Impact Patients Every Day!”; http://sco.lt/7iQKZt

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Pharma reputation from a patient perspective is growing! See the latest results of 2015 survey.

Pharma reputation from a patient perspective is growing! See the latest results of 2015 survey. | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

Reports published in 2016 on the Corporate Reputation of Pharma, as viewed by over 1,000 patient groups

 

The corporate Reputation of Pharma is growing:
In 2011 there was 42.0% of patient groups stating that the corporate reputation of the Pharma industry is "excellent" or "good". Although this percentage decreased to a 34% in 2012, it has increased ever since to 44.7% in 2015!

For a quick summary about our methodology and series of reports on corporate reputation of pharma and medical devices view the powerpoint here

 

Of course, this global indicators must be seen from the differentiated perspectives of regions and diseases!

 

Reports of Pharma's Corporate Reputation over regions:

GLOBAL, EUROPE and EASTERN Europe; GERMANY, ITALY, NORDIC, LATIN AMERICA, SPAIN, UK & USA

 

Reports of Pharma's Corporate Reputation over therapeutic areas.:

Cancer; Circulatory conditions; Diabetes; HIV/Aids; Hepatitis; Neurological conditions; Mental health; Skin; Respiratory and Rare diseases.
Reports for Respiratory and Circulatory conditions are forthcoming. 


Via rob halkes
Pharma Guy's insight:

Related article: “Pharma's Rep Among Patient Groups at 4-Year High”; http://sco.lt/6eoNgf It should be noted that several of the patient organizations participating in this survey receive funding from the pharmaceutical industry. Also read, “#Pharma to Patient Advocacy Groups Questioning High Drug Prices: ‘Why Are You Doing This to Us?’”; http://sco.lt/4sOB7J and “Americans Hate the #Pharma Industry Almost as Much as They Hate U.S. Gov't!”; http://sco.lt/7K6aLB

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rob halkes's curator insight, October 18, 2016 5:50 AM

Great to seen how pharma's Corporate Reputation in the eyes of the patients is growing globally from 2011 to 2015, with a dip in 2012. Study the nuances for different global regions and Disease conditions!

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Are There Too Many “Me Too” Insulin Products on the Market?

Are There Too Many “Me Too” Insulin Products on the Market? | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

How many long-acting insulin products does the market really need?  According to insurers, not many.  In talking with some physician thought leaders they have said that even when patients come in to request certain insulin pens that it’s really up to the patient’s insurer which one is covered. Are they concerned?  Not really as most patients still trust their doctor to recommend what’s best.  However, as a couple of doctors informed me “patient’s are a lot more savvy today”. “They know that their insurers are making mire and more treatment option decisions and they aren’t too happy about it”.

Can me-too drugs succeed despite the barriers?  Yes, if pharma companies can prove better patient outcomes and efficacies and communicate that to health plan managers.  Another way, though, would be through enhanced patient support that have been clinically tested and clearly show that they increase compliance and adherence thus lowering long term costs.

Are mobile apps an option?  According to most doctors the answer is “no” until apps are shown to be both accurate and actually used by patients.  Not too long ago, for example, I sat in some market research with cardiologists who said that they didn’t believe any of the mobile apps for CV provided accurate results. For more on that, read “Too Many mHealth Apps Are Failing the Usability Test”; http://sco.lt/7VF9H7 

Pharma Guy's insight:

With all the “me-too” insulin products on the market, why are insulin prices “soaring? Read, for example, “Soaring Insulin Prices Impact Patients Every Day!”; http://sco.lt/7iQKZt

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Ogilvy's Michael Johnston on Using the Familiar - NOT the Scary - in Diabetes Ads

Ogilvy's Michael Johnston on Using the Familiar - NOT the Scary - in Diabetes Ads | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

The diabetes category is constantly evolving, and that's what makes it interesting. Over the last 20 years, we've seen many advances in treatment, including thiazolidinediones, DPP-4 inhibitors, GLP-1 receptor agonists, and SGLT2 inhibitors.

The science behind these medicines is truly fascinating and underscores how far we've come from the days of purified pork insulin and sulfonylureas. However, a quick look across the advertising landscape shows a mix of creative approaches that remain tied to traditional and familiar executions.

Pharma Guy's insight:

Vaccine ads, however, are scary! 

http://bit.ly/ScaryAdVacc

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Novo Nordisk Thanks #FDA for Forcing It to Prove Victoza Can Decrease CV Events

Novo Nordisk Thanks #FDA for Forcing It to Prove Victoza Can Decrease CV Events | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

Researchers announced that Victoza, a diabetes drug sold by Danish drug giant Novo Nordisk , prevents heart attacks, strokes and cardiovascular deaths.

 

It is only the second diabetes drug ever to do so. The first, Jardiance, a pill sold by Eli Lilly and Boehringer Ingelheim , presented its positive results just last year. Researchers say that the new results could change the way that doctors treat diabetes, shifting the treatments doctors reach for after metformin, the tried-and-true first-line drug, which is generic.

 

“There’s a building momentum that maybe we do need to rethink the way diabetes is cared for in America,” says John Buse, the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill researcher who led the study, which was funded by Novo Nordisk.

 

And doctors and Novo Nordisk itself give credit to the new diabetes data to a surprising source: Tougher regulations for diabetes drugs from the Food and Drug Administration, which many in industry had previously decried, saying it was keeping new drugs from the market and hurting patients.

 

“I can almost guarantee you that these trials would not have been done if it had not been for the FDA regulations,” says Buse, who has been a consultant to many companies for years. “Before the guidance I was constantly pushing on companies to do these trials.”

 

That fact – that companies and patients are likely to benefit from the FDA’s toughness – goes against one of the common narratives in the drug industry and among the FDA’s critics: that high regulations slow patients’ access. In some cases, its clear, they also create a bar for industry to leap over, and deliver billions of dollars in spoils to companies that actually manage to help patients, not just blood test results.

 

The Victoza result is exactly the kind of marketing claim that makes a drug company salivate: Novo Nordisk can now tell patients and their insurers that the alternative to its drug is an earlier death.

Pharma Guy's insight:

The research showed that 13% of patients on Victoza had a heart attack, stroke, or death, compared to 14.9% on placebo, a 13% decrease in risk. Reductions in cardiovascular death (22%) and death from any cause (15%) were also statistically significant.

 

Now, perhaps, Novo won't have to bribe so many physicians or promote the drug for weight loss. For more on that, read "Novo Nordisk’s Victoza Tops List of Drug Payments to Physicians"; http://sco.lt/9141vV "Public Citizen: Off-Label Uses Promoted in DTC Ads for Diabetes Drugs"; http://sco.lt/84lZtR

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Sometimes #Pharma "Innovation" Doesn't Make Good Business Sense: Merck/Diabetes Case Study

Sometimes #Pharma "Innovation" Doesn't Make Good Business Sense: Merck/Diabetes Case Study | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

Merck & Co will no longer file for approval of once-weekly diabetes drug omarigliptin in the US or Europe.


The company said in a statement that the decision did not relate to any safety or efficacy issues with the DPP-4 inhibitor, which might suggest it is not confident that the market is prepared to pay a premium for a weekly compared to a once-daily drug such as Merck's own Januvia (sitagliptin) product.


There are thought to be other issues with once-weekly administration of DPP-4 inhibitors. While they are intended to reduce the burden of taking pills by diabetics and improve compliance, patients can rarely benefit from drug-free days as those on DPP-4 inhibitors often also take metformin, which must be dosed every day.


Some clinicians argue that it is easier for patients to keep track of dosing two drugs side by side rather than mixing weekly and daily doses.

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Have 5 Fingers or More? Then You Probably Have Prediabetes Says CDC

Know where you stand. Visit http://www.DoIHavePrediabetes.org and take the short online risk test now. You can also take the risk test through your phone or ...
Pharma Guy's insight:

Yikes! 

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ScientificAnimations's comment, November 15, 2017 2:13 AM
Does Prediabetes mean that you’ll get Diabetes? http://sco.lt/6CJwfJ
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Merely a Flesh Wound! MannKind Swears Afrezza Not Dead

Merely a Flesh Wound! MannKind Swears Afrezza Not Dead | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

On Tuesday, MannKind announced that Sanofi had terminated the pair's commercialization deal, which will officially cease no later than July 4. As Sanofi told Bloomberg in a statement, "the product never met even modest expectations, and we do not project Afrezza reaching even the lowest patient levels anticipated."


So what's next for the California company? According to TheStreet, "MannKind is as close to financial insolvency as it can possibly be without actually declaring bankruptcy," and its shares plunged on the Sanofi news. But the company isn't giving up. As CFO Matthew Pfeffer said on a call with investors, "this is not the end of the line for Afrezza or MannKind by any means."


The one thing that doesn't need to change, according to Pfeffer? "The real world experience of Afrezza users, which is everything we hoped it would be."


Pharma Guy's insight:

Here's a billion dollar idea for MannKind: develop a version for delivery of "medical" marijuana and then lobby in support of the legalization of marijuana! Now that would make us old folks invest in your company and boost your stock price!

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Boehringer Ingelheim Supports Undocumented Immigrants & Sides with Latino TV vs. Donald Trump. Bravo!

Boehringer Ingelheim Supports Undocumented Immigrants & Sides with Latino TV vs. Donald Trump. Bravo! | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

Two stories caught my attention yesterday:

One involved drug company Boehringer Ingelheim and Spanish-language television network Telemundo.

The other involved Donald Trump and another Spanish-language television network - Univision.

In the first case, a major (non-US) pharma company has the courage to support “illegal” Mexican immigrants and at the same time raise awareness of diabetes among the U.S. Latino public, whether they are illegal or not (read the press release here).

In the second case, Donald Trump evades questions about his Mexican deportation plans from Univision Spanish-language news anchor Jorge Ramos and kicks him out of a press conference with the words “Go Back To Univision” (read the story here).

How does Boehringer support “illegal” Mexicans in this country?


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Pharma Guy's insight:

An interesting way to support a political cause and promote good health at the same time. Also good for the bottom line, I suppose - not that there's anything wrong with that!

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Fish or Video Games: Which Option Better Helps Children Manage Type 1 Diabetes?

Fish or Video Games: Which Option Better Helps Children Manage Type 1 Diabetes? | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it
Teaming the habits of caring for a fish and checking their glucose helped children ages 10 to 17 slightly improve their hemoglobin values, a study found.


Dr. Olga T. Gupta, an assistant professor at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, recruited 29 patients, ages 10 to 17, with Type 1 diabetes. Sixteen got a fishbowl; a $5 gift card to buy a betta, or Siamese fighting, fish; and instructions to feed the fish in the morning and at night. They were also given instructions to check their blood glucose at the same time. Once a week, they were to change the fishbowl water and review their glucose logs with a parent.


The other patients did not get a fish but were promised a gift card later. The findings were published in Diabetes Educator in June.


After three months, the fish owners had slightly improved glucose control, as indicated by lower hemoglobin A1C values, while those without a fish had worsened.


Children in that age group tend to see an increase in A1C values over time, Dr. Gupta said, “so to bring that down even a small amount is a pretty big triumph.”

Pharma Guy's insight:

Meanwhile, compare these results with gaming incentives.


Listen to this Pharmaguy interview (http://bit.ly/PMT226) of Becky Reeve, Head of Professional Relations, Diabetes Franchise Sanofi UK & Ireland. We talk about Mission T1D, a new gaming app for children with type 1 diabetes in the UK. Mission T1D aims to support a serious message through gaming and play to encourage children with T1D (and their family, teachers and friends) to learn more about how to live with diabetes.

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Sales of Afrezza Inhaled Insulin Stymied by FDA Says Sanofi

Sales of Afrezza Inhaled Insulin Stymied by FDA Says Sanofi | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

The launch of MannKind's inhaled insulin Afrezza fell far short of expectations, bringing in about $1.1 million in its first seven weeks on the market, despite analyst predictions of a blockbuster.


Sanofi, MannKind's commercial partner for the drug, attributed the lower-than-expected sales to the FDA's requirement that patients undergo lung tests before starting treatment and while using the therapy as well as the broader need to raise awareness about the product. The drugmaker plans to launch a DTC campaign this summer. “It will take time for Afrezza to demonstrate its potential,” a Sanofi spokeswoman said,


But experts say the increasingly competitive nature of the US insulin market, especially when it relates to pricing, and the trend toward more stringent insurance reimbursement may have more to do with the slow adoption of Afrezza than a lack of awareness among diabetes patients and endocrinologists.

Pharma Guy's insight:

UPDATE (1/5/2016): Sanofi terminated its license agreement related to the development and commercialisation of MannKind's inhaled insulin therapy Afrezza, MannKind said today (here). MannKind noted that the deal will be terminated no later than six months from the effective date of Sanofi's notice or July 4. MannKind added that it "is reviewing its strategic options for Afrezza as a result of the termination."

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