Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News
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Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News
Pharmaguy curates and provides insights into selected drug industry news and issues.
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More Cannes Lions Health Gobbly Gook: Social Centricity

More Cannes Lions Health Gobbly Gook: Social Centricity | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

It’s time to move past patient centricity to social centricity. That was the message from inVentiv Health and GSW at Cannes Lions Health, where they presented the idea of a more holistic perspective.

What is social centricity? Not social media, as one might think at a marketing conference, but rather the entirety of a patient's social life and influences—things like family, friends, community, habits, cultural norms and workplace environment. The agency recently published a white paper with the findings, “Advancing Beyond Patient Centricity.”

“It started with the observation that the patient-centric approach that pharmaceutical companies, pharma advertising agencies and communications agencies in general are taking is not really moving the needle,” said Susan Perlbachs, executive director of inVentiv agency GSW. “Everyone thought patient-centric would win the day. If we focused on patients, the outcomes would be better and healthcare would be better. But it’s just not working.”

So Kathleen Starr, behavioral scientist at inVentiv, and her team InVentiv’s began what became a two-year enthnography study in which they followed 30 families from Boston; Portland, Oregon; Kansas City and Shreveport, Lousiana, and looked at the entire ecosystem and wide-ranging spheres of influence on patients.

“We’ve gotten really good about prompting initial behavior change. We can get people to do something the first time, maybe the second time—talk to your doctor, go to the pharmacy pick up your script, right? But what we haven’t figured out is what is the secret sauce for long-term behavior change?” she said.

“Studying those families for two years and seeing how their real life intersects with all the efforts they made to manage their conditions was really enlightening," she went on. "What we saw is that we aren’t going to make a dent in long-term behavior change until we start thinking about the social influences and use creativity to create a social context in which people can actually engage in healthcare.”

At Lions Health, the two presented insights from the study and then launched into an interactive session that included dozens of real-world examples where patients' behaviors were influenced by some kind of societal change.

 

Further Reading:

Pharma Guy's insight:

C'mon! Enough already! Do I need to add this to my Pharma Buzzword Glossary or will it just fade away if we ignore it?

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#Pharma Cannes Lion Health Grand Prix Award Goes to COPD Device Maker. 

#Pharma Cannes Lion Health Grand Prix Award Goes to COPD Device Maker.  | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

A deeply emotional campaign developed by Ogilvy & Mather for Philips showing people with lung conditions like cystic fibrosis and COPD learning how to sing and performing at the Apollo Theater won the pharma Grand Prix at the Cannes Lions Health festival of creativity.

 

The campaign, called Breathless Choir and set to Sting's “Every Breath You Take,” seeks to raise awareness about COPD. The 18 choir participants, each of whom has a respiratory condition that can limit their ability to talk or breath, used a Philips SimplyGo Mini, a portable oxygen concentrator.

 

The campaign is a departure in many ways from traditional medical device marketing, which often relies on the technical mechanics of how a device works. In this campaign the product is visible but it is not the focus of the film. Royal Philips has a long history of marketing healthcare products but it also sells electronic toothbrushes, baby monitors, and other consumer products. This may be one reason why the company was interested in marketing a medical device in this manner, von Plato noted.

 

This is the third year that Cannes Lions has held Lions Health, the specialty healthcare segment of the festival. The first year the jury declined to award a Grand Prix, citing the quality of the entries. Last year an unbranded campaign for AstraZeneca and developed by DigitasLBi called Take It From a Fish won the top prize.

 

[Meanwhile, AstraZeneca pulled the Take it From a Fish campaign; see "Like 3-Day Old Fish, AZ's Take it From a Fish Campaign Had Bad Taste"]

 

The gold winners are: Teva Neurosciences' ParkinSounds, developed by Havas Life in São Paulo; Aster Healthcare's The Nazar Initiative, developed by the Classic Partnership Advertising in Dubai; Last Words for the Indian Association of Palliative Care, developed by Medulla Communications; and Pfizer's branded-print campaign for Xalatan eyedrops, developed by McCann Health Hong Kong.

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Excuses, Excuses! Lions Health Grand Prix Still Smells Fishy to Me!

Excuses, Excuses! Lions Health Grand Prix Still Smells Fishy to Me! | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

When a pair of animated fish cracking jokes about triglyceride levels won the first pharma Grand Prix last year at the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity, the campaign was initially lauded for its smart, silly, irreverent tone. And then the backlash hit, and it was criticized for that same reason.

 

AstraZeneca had worked with DigitasLBi to develop the unbranded campaign, which kicked off in 2014 when the drugmaker received FDA approval to market Epanova, a prescription fish-oil pill that helps lower triglyceride levels.

 

Was this campaign emblematic of the good work the industry does? Did it matter that the campaign was unbranded, and not product-specific? Those are some of the questions agency leaders asked among themselves.

 

“I thought it was a very charming and disarming way to make people care about a subject matter that is quite mundane, which is triglycerides,” said Alexandra von Plato, this year's pharma jury president and group president of North America for the Publicis Healthcare Communications Group.

 

The use of humor, though, didn't deter criticism of the campaign, which stemmed from a deeper concern within the industry, she said. “In the scheme of how important this industry is and the importance of the work it does, [the campaign] felt a little trivial,” von Plato said. “That campaign for fish oil was good, but the sense was that it wasn't Grand Prix-worthy.”

 

Despite the success of Take It From a Fish, AstraZeneca at some point this year took down all of the campaign's online creative, including the website, Twitter feed, and YouTube videos.

 

Still, agency leaders say that the creation of Lions Health — this will be the specialty event's third year — is pushing agency creatives and their clients to do better work. “Even when people are complaining, it's probably good for the business because they are saying: Why aren't we winning more?” noted von Plato. “We certainly should be winning.”

 

Still, agency leaders say that the need for creativity in the pharmaceutical industry has more to do with addressing criticism about drug prices and the business case for direct-to-consumer advertising — which are two significant issues at play in the U.S. this year — than with winning the top prize at Cannes.

 

“The whole issue of pharma pricing and direct-to-consumer advertising has become a public and public health issue,” said Josh Prince, chief marketing officer at Omnicom Health Group and this year's jury president for the health and wellness category. “Because [the U.S. is] not a single-payer marketplace, a lot of things are third-party funded. [Since] consumers are now having to take on the cost burden of pharma, all of these issues are conspiring to make clients more conservative with their communications.”

 

But pulling back on risk-taking in marketing isn't expected to improve the dialogue between drugmakers and the patients, insurers, doctors, lawmakers, and investors who make up their audience.

 

“Conservatism is not going to help them,” Prince said. “It's really going to take inventiveness and inspiration and ambition and creativity. When it's done and it's done well, ideas can really cut through, even against all of the issues.”

Pharma Guy's insight:

Fish or no fish, this year's Grand Prix Award may be just as bad as last year's. For more on that, read: "Will New Cannes Lions Health Pharma Ad Prizes Be as Smelly as Last Year's Fish?"; http://sco.lt/5bGCZ7 

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Like 3-Day Old Fish, AZ's Take it From a Fish Campaign Had Bad Taste

Like 3-Day Old Fish, AZ's Take it From a Fish Campaign Had Bad Taste | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

AstraZeneca has suspended its Take it From a Fish campaign, taking down the online creative for a campaign that won the top prize at the 2015 Lions Health festival in Cannes, France.

The campaign website, TakeiItfromafish.com, the YouTube videos, and the Twitter feed and TakeItFromAFish.com website are all now inactive.

The unbranded campaign featured two dead talking fish, Sal and Marty, who discussed lowering their triglyceride levels amid jokes about their relationships, eating habits, and big-screen star quality.

“The Take It From A Fish campaign was an innovative pre-launch and non-branded marketing effort that has recently been discontinued,” an AstraZeneca spokesperson said in an email.

Take It from a Fish was the first campaign to win a Pharma Grand Prix at the Lions Health, the healthcare segment of the 2015 Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity, held each June. Rob Rogers, co-CEO of the Americas for Sudler & Hennessey and the 2015 jury president, last year described the campaign as “an example of a traditionally conservative client doing something really groundbreaking.”

By most industry standards, the campaign was successful. Within three months, there was an 11% increase in searches for high triglycerides and the Twitter feed had the fourth highest follower count among pharmaceutical brands, DigitasLBi claimed.

At the same time, industry executives say it's relatively uncommon for companies to take creative work offline even if it was designed to support an unbranded marketing campaign. Drugmakers traditionally launch unbranded campaigns before moving forward with branded efforts.

There are a handful of reasons why a drugmaker might choose to remove creative content for an unbranded program. One unnamed executive wondered if the removal of the Take It From a Fish creative was more a question of corporate concern about “taste and tone” or if the outcomes of additional clinical trials for other indications were not as promising as initially hoped. Another said that certain pre-launch communications must be amended to promote a product in a branded environment.

Pharma Guy's insight:

Personally, I never saw what was creative about Abbott and Costello channeled as dead fish.

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A "Good" Use for Man Boobs: Winning Grand Prix Lions Creativity Award

A "Good" Use for Man Boobs: Winning Grand Prix Lions Creativity Award | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

Ogilvy & Mather has ... picked up the Lions Health and United Nations Foundation Grand Prix for Good for its Man Boobs work. Man Boobs was developed on behalf of the The Breast Cancer Health Movement and takes on social media censorship of female breasts by demonstrating how to do a breast self-exam using a man. The social campaign also raises awareness for breast cancer in men. The Grand Prix for Good jury includes members of the Pharma and Health and Wellness juries, as well as representatives from the United Nations Foundation. Man Boobs also won 2 Gold Lions in the Health & Wellness category.

Pharma Guy's insight:

Social Media sites like FB and Instagram censors images of women's breasts claims the ad. So how do you show women how to do a breast examine on those sites. Simple. Call in a man to do the job :)

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Lions Health Awards Jury President Thinks "Smelly Fish" Award was "Charming" & "Best We Could Do"!

Lions Health Awards Jury President Thinks "Smelly Fish" Award was "Charming" & "Best We Could Do"! | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

Alexandra von Plato is serving as this year's Lions Health pharma jury president, leading a group of industry creative leaders judging the pharma category. She is group president of North America for the Publicis Healthcare Communications Group.

But be warned, pharma: Von Plato served as a juror the first year that the Cannes Lions festival held Lions Health — the same year that the jury declined to award the top prize in the pharma category over concerns that the submitted work wasn't worthy of a Grand Prix.

Here, von Plato talks to Jaimy Lee, executive editor at MM&M, about why it's wrong to compare the pharmaceutical industry to Skittles and why she expects to see more risk-taking in this year's creative work.  

There was some critical talk about last year's Grand Prix winner, Take It From a Fish. Why do you think that was?

Von Plato: I thought it was a very charming and disarming way to make people care about a subject matter that is quite mundane, which is triglycerides. In that regard, it was notable work because they took a tact that was designed to disarm people's resistance to a boring subject. In the scheme of how important this industry is and the importance of the work it does, it felt a little trivial. When we're giving a Grand Prix, in the pharmaceutical industry that makes medicine for sick people, it's not a stretch to come up with talking fish for fish oil. The overall feeling was: It was the best we could do, so they gave it a Grand Prix. The year I judged, in 2014, we didn't award a Grand Prix. That campaign for fish oil was good but the sense was [that] it wasn't Grand Prix worthy.

Pharma Guy's insight:

Fish or no fish, this year's Grand Prix Award may be just as bad as last year's. For more on that, read: "Will New Cannes Lions Health Pharma Ad Prizes Be as Smelly as Last Year's Fish?"; http://sco.lt/5bGCZ7

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Will New Cannes Lions Health Pharma Ad Prizes Be as Smelly as Last Year's Fish? 

Will New Cannes Lions Health Pharma Ad Prizes Be as Smelly as Last Year's Fish?  | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it
Pharma and healthcare marketers from around the world will descend on the South of France this weekend for the third annual Cannes Lions Health creative awards and confab. And this year, pharma marketers will have more opportunities to win a prize.

New this year is the splitting of Pharma Lions into three categories: black box, branded communications and unbranded communications. There are also additional categories in both the Pharma and Health & Wellness Lions including digital craft and branded content. The two-day health event prefaces the larger 6-day global advertising creative colloquium that draws more than 11,000 marketing industry players every year with speakers ranging from actors Mindy Kaling, Gwyneth Paltrow, Will Smith and Channing Tatum to CBS chief Les Moonves and Hulu CEO Mike Hopkins.

While the Health Lions haven’t reached the paparazzi-worthy status of the entertainment Lions, the juxtaposition of the two events--along with changing and raised expectations for creative in healthcare and pharma marketing--lends heft to the health awards.

“The closer the Health Lions can be to the Lions, the better off we all are,” said Dave Sonderman, chief creative officer at InVentiv Health’s GSW. “… Generally speaking in the pharma space, the idea of celebrating life-changing creativity is a fantastic way to think about what it is we’re all trying to do.”

One yet-unanswered question is if will there be a Grand Prix winner for pharma? While AstraZeneca’s “Take it From a Fish” campaign took the best in show for pharma last year, the judges declined to award a grand prize for pharma in the show’s first year, 2014. Finalists, or short listed entries, won’t be announced until Friday, with awards handed out at a gala on Saturday night.

Around the awards are dozens of sessions and talks about creativity in pharma and healthcare marketing, including ones about the power of truth featuring Good Morning America anchor Robin Roberts; using creativity to inspire brand love hosted by Johnson & Johnson and BBDO; and “Badass Science Seeks Advertising to Match” sponsored by Grey.

GSW’s Sonderman is moderating a panel discussion about the science and art of empathy, including Harvard research work and the role virtual reality is beginning to play. GSW associate director of innovation Travis Rooke, meanwhile, will participate in a first-ever on-site workshops with other global agency creatives to tackle air pollution and come up with creative and collaborative solutions.
Pharma Guy's insight:

AstraZeneca has suspended its Take it From a Fish campaign, taking down the online creative for a campaign that won the top prize at the 2015 Lions Health festival in Cannes, France. For more on that, see here: http://sco.lt/7SNIcz 

 

Is Better Ad Creative on the #Pharma Horizon? Geez! I Hope So! http://sco.lt/6c0aJd 

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Cannes Lions Health 2014: Is pharma advertising so bad it has no big winner?

Cannes Lions Health 2014: Is pharma advertising so bad it has no big winner? | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

Cannes Lions Health 2014 festival was supposed to be the world’s first contest of creativity in healthcare and pharma advertising. Made by advertising agencies and for advertising agencies, Lions Health could not find a grand prix winner in Cannes this year. Does it prove lack of creativity, or rather that the whole concept of advertising in the healthcare industry is wrong?


No grand prix of Cannes Lions Health 2014 was awarded.

Pharma Guy's insight:


The whole concept seems "A bit weird" to the authors at K-message. 

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