Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News
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Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News
Pharmaguy curates and provides insights into selected drug industry news and issues.
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AHA Cholesterol Guidelines Panel Vice Chair Finally Discloses Receiving $ from #Pharma

AHA Cholesterol Guidelines Panel Vice Chair Finally Discloses Receiving $ from #Pharma | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

In 2013, the American Heart Association issued new guidelines for treating cholesterol, causing a stir that more patients may wind up being treated with medicines. As part of that process, the expert panel members who oversaw the document disclosed their financial ties to drug makers. But one large payment was not divulged.

The panel vice chair did not disclose nearly $110,000 in research grants received from Eli Lilly for running tests for an experimental cholesterol treatment. 


Robinson said the decision not to disclose the Lilly payments was, essentially, a timing issue. She began work on the Lilly study shortly after the AHA panel completed the guideline recommendations and submitted them for publication. This submission also occurred before she received any payments from the drug maker.


“The Eli Lilly study started after the guideline recommendations were completed, so it was not on my radar to report,” she wrote. She added that the funds were paid to the university to cover the cost of the research she was conducting, which is a standard price. “They are not direct payments to me,” she added.


The AHA further explained that Robinson abstained from voting on the recommendations because of her financial ties to several other drug makers, which had been disclosed.


One labor union, which first reported the failure to disclose the Lilly payment and is critical of financial ties between industry and the AHA, worries such relationships can raise health care costs. “The AHA should prohibit its authors and leadership from accepting industry payments,” said Arthur Phillips, a research analyst at Unite Here.


However, industry and some researchers argue completely severing ties is not practical, because they say the most qualified experts often have relationships with drug makers.

Pharma Guy's insight:

So, the drug industry has all of the most qualified physicians on its payroll? Thereby making conflict-of-interest inevitable?

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More Docs Debunk COI Myth in NEJM/BMJ & Laud Financial Ties to #BigPharma

More Docs Debunk COI Myth in NEJM/BMJ & Laud Financial Ties to #BigPharma | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

For years, critics have complained that doctors and the pharmaceutical industry have become too cozy, creating all sorts of unseemly conflicts of interest. That's led to a push for new rules to police these relationships and enforce greater transparency.


Now experts are debating whether these measures have gone too far. There's an interesting back-and-forth between doctors in the New England Journal of Medicineand the British Medical Journal on whether conflicts of interest are actually a huge problem in medicine — and whether efforts to regulate them do more harm than good.


Rosenbaum argues that the stigma against doctor-industry collaboration could have all sorts of negative effects. It might mean that effective drugs get to market more slowly. It might mean that experts with important views get ignored or silenced because they happen to work with drug companies. It might mean that "life-saving therapies whose development requires the combined talents of clinicians and industry scientists don’t materialize."


"I’m not suggesting abandoning regulation," Rosenbaum writes. "When the rules work, they protect us and our patients from fraudulent marketing and twisting of facts. But when rules merely cloak an anti-industry bias in the false promise of scientific virtue, we undermine potentially productive research collaborations, dissemination of expertise, and public trust."

Pharma Guy's insight:


You might be interested in reading this Pharma marketing News article: PharmaPhobia & What to Do About It - http://bit.ly/pmn140202pphobia 

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