Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News
181.4K views | +6 today
Follow
Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News
Pharmaguy curates and provides insights into selected drug industry news and issues.
Curated by Pharma Guy
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Pharma Guy
Scoop.it!

"Beyond the Pill" Marketing Necessary for Drugs That Turn Cancer into a Chronic Disease

"Beyond the Pill" Marketing Necessary for Drugs That Turn Cancer into a Chronic Disease | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

Up until 2001, people diagnosed with multiple myeloma on average lived for 30 months after diagnosis. Newer drugs such as Takeda's Velcade, approved in 2003, and Celgene's Revlimid, approved in 2006, extended that average to 43 months by 2008. 


And future treatments may extend life by six years on average by 2022 based on a model created by sales and marketing consulting firm ZS, which co-authored the report with Celgene and the Cedars-Sinai Outpatient Cancer Center at the Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Center Institute. Celgene markets several multiple-myeloma drugs including Thalomid and Pomalyst.


What might they do differently based on the improved survival data? Well, they may choose to rework patient-support and education programs for nurses and physicians. Patients may also need more information about how to manage side effects from the drugs if they are taking them as a maintenance therapy, according to Nisha Gilra, co-author of the study.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pharma Guy
Scoop.it!

Patients Blamed for Pfizer's Pfailure to Launch OTC Lipitor

Patients Blamed for Pfizer's Pfailure to Launch OTC Lipitor | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

To meet the FDA requirements for OTC approval, Pfizer ran a large clinical trial to determine if patients taking OTC Lipitor would get their own blood tests at a pharmacy to see if the drug improved their cholesterol profile. The trial then would determine if patients would indeed make the correct health decisions based on their results. Most OTC drugs, such as pain relievers, heartburn drugs, and anti-allergy agents, all relieve symptoms quickly and patients know right away if the drug is helping them. However, high LDL cholesterol, while harmful over many years, is symptomless and the FDA was concerned that patients would either misdiagnosis themselves or not be motivated to get their blood tested in the first place.


As part of their recent second quarter 2015 financial results, Pfizer announced the disappointing results of this study.


“A Phase 3 ‘actual use’ trial intended to simulate the OTC use of Lipitor (atorvastatin calcium) 10 mg was completed in December 2014. The study did not meet its primary objectives of demonstrating patient compliance with the direction to check their low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) level and, after checking their LDL-C level, take appropriate action based on their test results. Based on dialogue with the FDA about the program and the analysis of this data, the program was terminated.”


Perhaps it is not surprising that patients didn’t take personal control of their healthcare as had been hoped.

Pharma Guy's insight:

One wonders if the study was properly designed and conducted to make it easier for patients to "take personal control of their healthcare." Pharma often cites the need to "go beyond the pill" to increase adherence. Was there any of that "beyond" stuff in the trial?

more...
No comment yet.