The FDA Social Media Guidances May Not Change Anything: Senak Explains | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it
After a five-year wait, the FDA this week released guidelines for how drug and device makers should deal with social media. One provides a blueprint for correcting misinformation on websites run by others, while the second guidance discusses the use of Twitter. We spoke with Mark Senak, a senior vice president and partner at the FleishmanHillard public relations firm that works closely with drug makers and who also writes the Eye On FDA blog, about what the guidances may – or may not - change.


Pharmalot: And what about the other guidance, which refers to using Twitter?


Senak: Using Twitter for specific product communications prior to the guidance was problematic because there were so many unknowns. But now it’s problematic because of what we know.


Pharmalot: What do you mean?


Senak: In general, the manufacturer must present risk information in the same venue as any discussion of a product. In characters placed in a limited venue, people didn’t know how to cram all of that into 140 characters, particularly after the banishment of a one-click rule in 2009, [my emphasis] when you couldn’t use a link to take you elsewhere to read the info.


So people avoided Twitter, because it wasn’t known how to satisfy requirements. Looking at the guidance and the example of how to develop a Tweet, it’s still so constricted that I think product-specific communication by Twitter is still problematic. Again, I think it’s a situation where not much has changed.