Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News
184.6K views | +78 today
Follow
Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News
Pharmaguy curates and provides insights into selected drug industry news and issues.
Curated by Pharma Guy
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Pharma Guy
Scoop.it!

A "Good" Use for Man Boobs: Winning Grand Prix Lions Creativity Award

A "Good" Use for Man Boobs: Winning Grand Prix Lions Creativity Award | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

Ogilvy & Mather has ... picked up the Lions Health and United Nations Foundation Grand Prix for Good for its Man Boobs work. Man Boobs was developed on behalf of the The Breast Cancer Health Movement and takes on social media censorship of female breasts by demonstrating how to do a breast self-exam using a man. The social campaign also raises awareness for breast cancer in men. The Grand Prix for Good jury includes members of the Pharma and Health and Wellness juries, as well as representatives from the United Nations Foundation. Man Boobs also won 2 Gold Lions in the Health & Wellness category.

Pharma Guy's insight:

Social Media sites like FB and Instagram censors images of women's breasts claims the ad. So how do you show women how to do a breast examine on those sites. Simple. Call in a man to do the job :)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pharma Guy
Scoop.it!

Looking on the "Bright Side" of Metastatic Cancer Survival

A paper by Dr. Patricia Steeg of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) published in a prestigious journal, Nature Reviews Cancer calls out an “alarming” but debatable decline in survival in other advanced cancers, including ovarian, prostate and uterine tumors, and a general lack of progress against metastatic disease.

 

From 2000 through 2010, median survival for U.S. women with metastatic breast cancer increased from 22 to 30 months.

 

From 2000 through 2010, the 5-year relative survival for women with metastatic breast cancer rose, from 25.9% to 32.6%, This increase was statistically significant (confidence intervals: 24.9 – 27.0%, and 31.6 – 33.6%, respectively).

 

What this means, first, is that in the five years before 2000, half of women with stage 4 breast cancer lived for 22 months or longer; by 2010, half lived 30 months or longer. These findings are based on data in a public database (SEER 11), collected in the periods 1995-2000 and 2004-2010, respectively. As explained in a handy SEER glossary, “relative” 5-year survival indicates how long the cancer patients live compared to age and sex-matched controls in the population.

 

The low numbers might upset someone who is not aware of the fact that–despite so much progress against early-stage, local and “regional” breast cancers–metastatic breast cancer remains incurable. That most women with metastatic disease die within three years of diagnosis, still, or at least until 2010, is a very sad statistic.

 

On the bright side: Survival has gone up, and measurable progress was evident by 2010. I’d go as far to say that most likely, and almost certainly, survival continued to improve from 2010 and 2015. If you consider all the new drugs that have come out since 2010, particularly for estrogen-positive, hormone-sensitive breast cancer, the most frequent forms, and for Her2 positive cases, for which there are, now, quite a few helpful agents (there were none in 2000), and better diagnostic testing for tumor subtypes, that these medications can be prescribed sensibly, the outlook should be better now, in 2016. And by 2020, who knows?

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pharma Guy from HEALTHCARE & SOCIAL MEDIA
Scoop.it!

Direct patient engagement through social media speeds recruitment to cancer research study

Direct patient engagement through social media speeds recruitment to cancer research study | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it
A crowd-sourcing strategy aimed at accelerating research into metastatic breast cancer has registered more than 2,000 patients from all 50 states in its first seven months, report researchers from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard at the American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting.

Via Julie O'Donnell, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
more...
No comment yet.