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Mobile apps emerging as essential population health tools

Mobile apps emerging as essential population health tools | M-HEALTH  By PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
While mobile apps are new enough on the care delivery scene that many providers have only begun dabbling, consumers are sending a strong message that forward-thinking hospital executives can translate into an opportunity for improving population health management programs.Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine is conducting clinical trials that use mobile health apps to do much more than just communicate with patients — the software teaches mental health patients cognitive behavioral therapy, or CBT, techniques designed to improve population health and reduce mental healthcare costs.This story is part of a reporting package on the rise of population in health in healthcare IT management. Stories include our analysis of health system strategies, an overview of the work done by Essentia Health and a look at how mobile apps are supporting initiatives.Designed by Northwestern's Center for Behavioral Intervention Technologies, the ThinkFeelDo website (a responsive design site built to render effectively on any device) and the IntelliCare suite of mobile apps (available in the Google Play store for Android devices, with Apple iOS apps in the works) break up the various CBT techniques into separate modules to make learning the techniques and applying them in situations an easier task.The modules include text, animation and video. Caregiver coaches, on the other end of the mobile site and apps, review patient progress and can intervene during lessons to help patients with any challenges or issues and to provide encouragement."Costs can be saved by giving depressed patients these kinds of tools, decreasing overall health care utilization for an individual," said Kenneth R. Weingardt, scientific director at the Center for Behavioral Intervention Technologies. Weingardt also is a licensed psychologist."We are now saving more money because the cost of the app is much lower than the cost of face-to-face. For some folks who are fairly well-functioning and can go it alone, these types of technology may provide them with what they need so they do not have a long depressive episode that impacts their health and costs a health plan money."ThinkFeelDo and IntelliCare are still in clinical trials at Northwestern, though CBITs is in discussions with Kaiser about deploying IntelliCare through its patient portal."Mobile interventions have much farther reach than individual providers can have," Weingardt said. "They can reach many more people beyond those we can see in our clinic. And a health system that adopts these kinds of tools can improve their bandwidth and their ability to address these problems beyond the capacity of their workforce.”[Like Healthcare IT News on Facebook]In the Northwestern’s clinical trials, Weingardt added, that means giving participants tools to get symptoms under control and making it less likely they will come back with complaints.Providers such as Northwestern and other simply cannot ignore the trend toward mobile tools any longer, said population health management vendor Enli Health Intelligence chief medical officer Joseph Siemienczuk, MD."We have to follow the communication preferences of the community and and it is clear that their communication preferences have moved to mobile technology,” Siemienczuk said. "As we pursue effectiveness, moving patient engagement activities to mobile technology is an imperative."Twitter: @SiwickiHealthIT
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M-HEALTH  By PHARMAGEEK
M HEALTH...and Mobile marketing - Mobile, Ipad and Apps.. #mhealth #ehealth #healthapps
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The true potential of mobile health tech - PMLiVE #esante #hcsmeufr

The true potential of mobile health tech - PMLiVE #esante #hcsmeufr | M-HEALTH  By PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it

The meaning of life is a difficult concept to pin down. It is riven by subjective judgement and is the ceaseless target of books, films, forests of greeting cards and fridge magnet philosophy.

Quality of life is a gold standard in healthcare but it is an equally elusive assay with enigmatic, multi-dimensional components that often confound formulae and equations.

Its study is an acronym-rich environment with the World Health Organization’s Quality of Life Assessment (WHOQOL) reaching into more than 20 separate measures to demonstrate the depths needed to provide tangible results.

Recognising and calibrating Quality of Life (QoL) has moved 
from relative backwaters to the healthcare super highways, driven by the need to manage ageing populations living with co-morbidities and the opportunity presented by the vast array of monitoring technology.

More than three billion health apps have been downloaded globally but many observers question whether the pharmaceutical industry has harnessed the true potential of mobile health to improve patient outcomes and create more complete treatment packages that are attractive to payers struggling with the tissue-thin budgets.

Putting the patient at the heart of treatment is a long-cherished goal but creating monitoring systems that are reliable, responsive and generate relevant results is a complex task.

Craig Mills, group managing director of Frontera Group, the London-based group specialising in patient behaviour, believes industry may be missing a crucial factor… the human factor.

Golden age of opportunity “Of the 3.2 billion health apps downloaded each year to help and support those living with health challenges, only 0.2% of those came from pharma, with five apps responsible for more than 50% of that contribution,” Mills says. In addition, 85% of all health apps downloaded experience fewer than 5,000 installations. “Research tells us that a key issue is that most health apps are developed in isolation of patients. The most important thing to recognise here is that the people they sought to serve and influence are not part of the process - a huge irony given that more than 90% of patients want to play a more active role in decisions about their health. Pharma appears oblivious to the wealth of evidence demonstrating that increasing a patient’s activation measure (by increasing their knowledge and confidence) improves outcomes and therefore their life quality.

“We are already in a golden era of opportunity, but pharma has not necessarily embraced this yet because of its reluctance to believe in the consequences.”

But patient populations are unlikely to wait for pharma to connect with their healthcare.

“It is happening without pharma,” Mills adds. “If you look at HealthUnlocked (one of the world’s largest social networks connecting patients), it includes more than 700 different communities and has over 4.7 million unique visitors a month. Members communicating with their peers over a few months on the network show an increase in their activation measure.

“So, whether pharma is immersing itself in it enough or not, patients are getting on with it themselves and, because of that, their outcomes and QoL improve. That’s a really powerful thing.

“Patient activation measures are useful because they gauge a patient’s knowledge and ability to deal with health information along with their confidence to navigate consultations and conversations 
with healthcare professionals (HCPs). People who take a bigger role in their health recover quicker and live longer.

“So, if life expectancy and health behaviour are directly correlated, 
it should follow that if we can create an environment where people are more active within their health, 
we can influence their health-related quality of life at a population level.”

The Quality of Life challenge  also features a trust element  with companies needing to  reach into the populations of  the digitally-suspicious and  digitally-naïve who vastly outnumber those who make
their digital health a calling and happily wreathe themselves  in wearables.

Scramble to record data

“We need patient engagement and activation before we even start to get to a point where we can measure patient QoL,” says Dennis O’Brien, CEO of Lucid, the medical education and communications group of companies. “We can try to collect data through the clinic or digital media all we like but if patients are not engaged with the disease and don’t understand the value of it then we will fail or end up with a particular subset of patients. Patient activation is the start point. “I would like us to be in a place where everyone would use simple watches and devices to collect data but at the moment we are confined to or skewed by a group of patients who are the most motivated. It’s good that we have that data but it is not measuring the true impact we have on the world.” But the scramble to record data and make it relevant could lead to patient overload with pharma companies, HCPs and patient associations clamouring for access to their data, he fears.

“We don’t want them to feel like they have to open yet another app - how many passwords do they already struggle to remember?” adds O’Brien. “The technological touch-points currently available are full of support and benefit yet disease apps tend to be too simplistic and brand- or disease-centric. Do we really believe our audience will open an app for every disease or condition they have? We have to get into the real world.

“If we are going to get patients to measure their QoL, and it is going to be reliable, we will need to engage bigger and better than ever before, otherwise we are going to get a small amount of data from a small amount of patients. To make that step-change in understanding patients and taking it to a next level of caring about their QoL, we need to make sure we engage at a higher level and that requires us to think about all patients and most importantly how they live their life, not just their condition and their experience with HCPs for a particular condition.

“We are competing with Instagram and Facebook so we have to get to a place where there is a real benefit that can be seen so they are encouraged to take an active role in their disease management.

“If it works, we will get better drug delivery, improved adherence, more committed patients and a reduction of waste. It is a big prize.” O’Brien sees benefit in collaborations between pharma companies and digital healthcare providers who have the potential to collect live and relevant data.

“If you look at Lloyds Bank, they are positioning themselves as being able to take care of much more of your life than a traditional bank can by being a holistic money management platform enabling you to manage bills, mortgages, insurance renewals, everything and it is an interesting and important concept for pharma to consider,” he adds. “There is no reason why pharma cannot build enough trust to run a holistic service that allows it to track and care for patients. Businesses like Babylon Health have managed to engage large numbers of patients; it’s not that the technology isn’t there, its about how we think we can add value.

“Pharma could look at acquiring digital technology so it can provide a more holistic level of care."

Quality of life review

“Industry has to recognise that to be successful in measuring QoL, we have to provide engaging technology that adds value to patients in their lives, not just asks them to report how they feel.”Measuring QoL is infecting all areas of healthcare with NICE, the UK government’s healthcare regulators, in the middle of a two-year review of its Quality of Life Years (QALY) assessment that is applied to all new drugs entering the market. It wants to extend QoL metrics to social care.It states: “Some people feel that the existing measures of health-related quality of life might not capture important benefits of treatments beyond health-related quality of life, such as independence or improved relationships with friends, family and carers. At the same time, different measures are used in healthcare, social care and public health, making it difficult to compare across these sectors, which is important when thinking about the wider health and social  care budget.”

The review, led by the School of Health and Related Research at the University of Sheffield, with collaborators from the University of Kent, the Office of Health Economics and the EuroQol Research Foundation, is conducting interviews and surveys with patients, social care users and the public to define the critical aspects of quality of life and how best to measure them.

In Finland, the government is releasing citizens’ well-being records to professionals and researchers to boost outcomes and energise the nation’s preventative health strategy. Its social affairs and health ministry permanent secretary Paivi Sillanaukee emphasised its commitment to digital by echoing the phrase: “Data is the new oil.”

Alex Brock, head of digital, Europe, at Syneos Health Communications, says: “Technology is really an enabler. But, for the most part, whatever metrics you assign won’t necessarily be fundamentally driven by technology. Rather, it vastly improves our ability to generate and track data so, once we define what we think is important, there are more ways to capture and analyse this data.”

Syneos Health, an integrated clinical and commercial biopharmaceutical solutions company, provided key insight earlier this year with a study that showed the vast majority of respondents felt doctors (56%), hospitals (44%) and the NHS (39%) should be responsible for providing artificial intelligence tools in healthcare - pharma companies trailed at 8%.

“The implication of course is that if pharma wants to be involved, partnership is the only way forward,” adds Brock. “To get to a genuinely effective understanding, you’re effectively asking a patient ‘what does QoL mean to you?’, which may result  in a far more qualitative and  unique set of experiential  measures. But this is really where you have the potential to unlock better ways of providing care  which hopefully translates into better outcomes.”

Open minds

Syneos is active in a number of projects tracking the impact of a variety of digital engagements and measurements of conditions to mine a deeper sense of patients than is provided by traditional research.

“The key insight we uncovered was the importance of tone. Being able to communicate with patients in a more informal, human way was proven to be preferable to the conventional, more serious/paternalistic pharma tone. I think there’s a potential shift, or opportunity, in terms of how QoL data is collected, which is potentially really exciting.”

It is clear that pharma will need an open mind and the capacity to incorporate a colourful palette of human behaviour nuances to measure and improve QoL generally and be prepared to get granular 
to connect strongly with subsets and individuals.

Craig Mills, and others, are clear about the potential of digital measurement to improve QoL and the willingness of the public to adopt it with or without pharma’s involvement.

“Is industry missing a golden opportunity? In a sense we are but it will come when we can establish a belief in the consequences of integrating the patient story into the scientific narrative that seems to dominate the way pharma works,” 
he says.

Dennis O’Brien concludes: “The companies that embrace technology and harness that technology to add value to patients will be the companies that win in ten years’ time.”


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Cancer du poumon : une application mobile d'auto-surveillance permet d'augmenter la survie  #esante #hcsmeufr

Cancer du poumon : une application mobile d'auto-surveillance permet d'augmenter la survie  #esante #hcsmeufr | M-HEALTH  By PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
MoovCare, une application mobile d'auto-surveillance permet de détecter précocement les rechutes chez les patients atteints du cancer du poumon. Présenté pour la première fois à l'ASCO en 2016, il refait le point aujourd'hui avec 2 ans de recul.

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mHealth Finds a Place for Fitbit in Remote Patient Monitoring Research #esante #hcsmeufr #digitalhealth

mHealth Finds a Place for Fitbit in Remote Patient Monitoring Research #esante #hcsmeufr #digitalhealth | M-HEALTH  By PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
New research finds that consumer-grade mHealth wearables like the Fitbit can be used in remote patient monitoring programs for heart patients.

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Florian Morandeau's curator insight, June 4, 1:03 AM

mHealth wearables are finally beginning to make their mark in remote patient monitoring programs.

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Kid calm : Des dessins animés pour rassurer l’enfant en #radiothérapie - par le Centre le lutte contre le cancer de Strasbourg - UNICANCER #hcsmeufr #esante 

Kid calm : Des dessins animés pour rassurer l’enfant en #radiothérapie - par le Centre le lutte contre le cancer de Strasbourg - UNICANCER #hcsmeufr #esante  | M-HEALTH  By PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it

KID CALM  : un projet présenté au Festival com'santé par le Centre Paul Strauss, Centre le lutte contre le cancer de Strasbourg - UNICANCER 


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Festival Communication Santé's curator insight, May 31, 2:03 AM

KID CALM  : un projet présenté au Festival com'santé par le Centre Paul Strauss, Centre le lutte contre le cancer de Strasbourg -UNICANCER

 

Le projet en bref

La radiothérapie nécessite une immobilité parfaite du patient. Ce défi est plus difficile à relever chez l’enfant, qui peut être particulièrement angoissé face à ce milieu de haute technicité. Le projet KIDCALMvise ainsi à rassurer l’enfant, améliorer son confort, son adhésion au traitement et au matériel de contention.

Concrètement, le système permet de projeter une vidéo sur l’anneau de l’appareil de radiothérapie grâce à un micro-projecteur, à chaque séance d’irradiation. L’effet hypnotique des dessins animés chez l’enfant et de l’image de manière plus générale a été utilisé. Les contraintes techniques du projet ont été régulièrement discutées au sein de réunions où tous les intervenants de la chaîne de traitement ont été consultés.

L’amélioration de l’accueil des enfants au sein du département de radiothérapie s’inscrit dans une démarche ancienne (développement de dessins animés explicatifs, matériel de contention spécifique, équipement audiovisuel de la salle de réveil...).

En quoi ce projet est-il innovant ?

L’approche actuelle reste peu développée ; elle permet pourtant un effet positif immédiat sur l’enfant et même ses parents. Elle ouvre la perspective à la fois du possible évitement des anesthésies générales itératives chez les plus petits pour qui l’effet hypnotique des dessins animés a déjà opéré, et à la fois du déploiement du système chez les adultes particulièrement angoissés.

Bénéfices patients / salariés

Les principaux bénéfices pour les patients sont la réassurance et l’observance, alors que le projet permet aux salariés du Centre une meilleure cohésion de l’équipe ainsi qu’une plus grande facilité de prise en charge chez les enfants atteints de cancer.

 

Projet porté par le  Dr Céline VIGNERON - Radiothérapeute - Centre Paul Strauss, Centre le lutte contre le cancer de Strasbourg -UNICANCER

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mHealth Scores High With Consumers in Boosting Medication Adherence #hcsmeufr #esante #digitalhealth

mHealth Scores High With Consumers in Boosting Medication Adherence #hcsmeufr #esante #digitalhealth | M-HEALTH  By PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it

Consumers are looking to mobile health tools, such as mHealth apps and wearables, to improve their medication adherence.

A recent study of some 800 prescription medication users, conducted by Russell Research for Express Scripts, finds that roughly half believe mHealth technology would help them become more adherent – and one-third of those would be more likely to use them if the tools were set up for them.

 

With experts suggesting at least half of the nation’s medication users aren’t taking their drugs as prescribed – costing some $300 billion a year in avoidable healthcare expenses, or $1,000 per person – medication adherence is a significant issue and one that healthcare experts have vowed to tackle more aggressively.

“This survey shows that while patients with chronic diseases know that medication is critical to their treatment and health, they don’t always act on that knowledge,” Snezana Mahon, PharmD, vice president of St. Louis-based Express Scripts Clinical Solutions, said in a press release. “Given the huge cost of nonadherence to an individual patient’s health, as well as to the country as a whole, it’s essential for patients and clinicians to work together to find solutions to help overcome barriers to adherence.”

Those taking medications would seem to agree. Almost half of those surveyed said taking their drugs as prescribed is the most important part of their health regimen, a percentage higher than those selecting a routine check-up (30 percent).

And they seem interested in improving their habits: 56 percent said reminders would more likely help them improve adherence, and 19 percent said those reminders would definitely help them.

That’s where mHealth comes in.

 

“The three main drivers of non-adherence come from cost, clinical or behavioral reasons,” said Kyle Amelung, PharmD, BCPS, a senior clinical consultant on Express Scripts. “All three can be solved for through mobile health tools.”

 

Younger consumers are particularly interested in mobile health technology: 74 percent of those between the ages of 18 and 34 believe such tools would help them, and half would be more likely to use the technology if it was set up for them. Among those age 35-54, the percentages were 62 and 46, respectively.

 

“We believe success comes from getting within the patient’s flow and reminding them about their health when and how the patient prefers,” Amelung said. “Most people view mobile devices as a personal productivity tool that can be used to check the news, connect with friends or get the score of the game. Incorporating these devices into taking better care of yourself is a logical position – but people still don’t want to be ‘nagged’ by family or friends about their health.”

 

That point was also made in the survey: 27 percent said they would most not want to be reminded to take their medications by a health device, while 40 percent said a spouse or partner would be most bothersome and 31 percent said the same of a friend. In each case, respondents felt that they’d be nagged by those prods and end up resenting the reminders.

Amelung emphasized that mHealth alone won’t solve the medication adherence issue.

 

“The key to mHealth tools is partnering them with a live clinician that can oversee the data, flag high-risk patients, and intervene as appropriate,” he said. “Technology is not the solution; technology is the means to an effective solution. To truly affect change, any proposed solution must be partnered with live clinical support to answer any questions and provide specialized guidance to the patient.”

 

The survey also shed some interesting light on prescription habits.

More than half of those surveyed feel they’re doing better at sticking to their prescriptions than others – including 60 percent of seniors. And more respondents were unconcerned about missing a medication (31 percent) than were extremely or very concerned (29 percent).

 

Among other results:

  • 67 percent would be motivated by a reward to take their medications as prescribed.
  • 82 percent would be motivated to take their medications by a financial reward, while 15 percent chose points toward a merchandise purchase and 3 percent selected a charitable contribution.
  • Only 33 percent understand the financial significance of medication adherence; 35 percent believe the annual cost to healthcare runs about $150 billion (or $500 per person), while 19 percent put that figure at $25 billion ($75 per person) and 12 percent said the cost was around $8.3 billion, or $25 per person.
  • 44 percent cited side effects as the primary reason for not taking medications as prescribed; 28 percent picked inconvenience and 21 percent said they stopped taking their drugs because they were feeling better and felt they didn’t need to continue the prescription.

Amelung said some of the survey’s results surprised him.

“One of the most surprising findings was that two-thirds of those polled say they are more likely to take better care of their health and adhere to their medications when rewarded for their efforts,” he noted.  “We all want to be in optimal health, but this data point supports the long-standing belief that only the potential of better health outcomes is not sufficient in getting patients to make the best decisions and take the appropriate actions for their health.”

“In today’s world, the distractions of the moment often get in the way of pursuing what’s in the best interest of our care. We sometimes forgo scheduling or keeping doctor appointments. We skip necessary lab tests or our annual flu shot. Many of us forget to refill our medication or we don’t remember to take it every day.  … For most of us, engaging in the right daily behaviors to improve our health is a challenge because these actions fall out of our normal routines and habits – and so, we skip them. Knowing that there must be something more for the patient to obtain and that financial rewards are an effective way to motivate patients, we can offer specific carrots to incentivize healthier actions and lead to decrease costs in the healthcare system.”


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Technical Dr. Inc.'s curator insight, May 11, 4:27 AM
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

Grengar Pitter's comment, June 6, 11:59 AM
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Best iOS and Android Medical Apps - May 18, 2018  #hcsmeufr #esante #digitalhealth

Best iOS and Android Medical Apps - May 18, 2018  #hcsmeufr #esante #digitalhealth | M-HEALTH  By PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
Hundreds of new apps hit iOS and Android app stores every week. We’ve sorted through them to pick the best medical apps for medical professionals. Medical Apps for iOS Cause of Death Reference Guide The Cause of Death Reference Guide app was created by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to provide a quick …
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La première appli mobile corse pour prendre soin de sa santé | Corse-Matin  #hcsmeufr #esante 

La première appli mobile corse pour prendre soin de sa santé | Corse-Matin  #hcsmeufr #esante  | M-HEALTH  By PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
Corse-Matin - La première appli mobile corse pour prendre soin de sa santé

Depuis deux jours, une application mobile innovante peut être installée sur smartphone (système iOS uniquement pour l'instant). A Salute se présente comme un assistant de poche au service de la santé et plus particulièrement du dépistage des cancers.


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Familicare : application mobile pour aidants

Familicare : application mobile pour aidants | M-HEALTH  By PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
Une nouvelle application mobile a été lancée pour accompagner les aidants dans l'accompagnement de patients : Familicare.

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Prescribed Health Apps Market 2018 to 2024: By Operating System - Windows, Androids, iPhones and Excellent Growth Seen in Healthcare Industry with Pivotal Players - openPR  #hcsmeufr #esante #digit...

Prescribed Health Apps Market 2018 to 2024: By Operating System - Windows, Androids, iPhones and Excellent Growth Seen in Healthcare Industry with Pivotal Players - openPR  #hcsmeufr #esante #digit... | M-HEALTH  By PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
Press release - Market Research Future - Prescribed Health Apps Market 2018 to 2024: By Operating System - Windows, Androids, iPhones and Excellent Growth Seen in Healthcare Industry with Pivotal Players - published on openPR.com
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Une adolescente américaine sauvée par son Apple Watch #rein

Une adolescente américaine sauvée par son Apple Watch #rein | M-HEALTH  By PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
Une adolescente américaine a été alertée par son Apple Watch au sujet de son rythme cardiaque, anormalement élevé. Les médecins ont ensuite décelé une insuffisance rénale qui aurait pu mettre ses jours en danger si le diagnostic avait été plus tardif.

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Renaloo's curator insight, May 3, 5:18 AM

Une adolescente américaine sauvée par son Apple Watch #rein

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Cutting-edge app could shrink state's high maternal death rate  #hcsmeufr #esante #digitalhealth

Cutting-edge app could shrink state's high maternal death rate  #hcsmeufr #esante #digitalhealth | M-HEALTH  By PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
An app that links pregnant women directly to their doctors could shrink the number of Texas mothers who die during and after birth.
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Doximity Dialer Integration Allows Physicians to Call Patients in App -  #hcsmeufr #esante #digitalhealth

Doximity Dialer Integration Allows Physicians to Call Patients in App -  #hcsmeufr #esante #digitalhealth | M-HEALTH  By PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it

Doximity, a social network for physicians has announced the integration of Doximity Dialer into the Doximity app. In the past, this tool has been its own application, separate from the main network. With this integration, physicians will be able to privately call patients, read news, and connect with colleagues all in one place – making their lives a little easier and more productive. 

According to the 2017 Connected Patient Report commissioned by Salesforce, Americans currently communicate with their doctors via traditional channels, with 80% using the phone. Considering this fact, it’s no surprise that Doximity’s Dialer tool has become one of the most popular and frequently used features, garnering over 5.6 million patient calls made to date, which has saved physicians an average 20 minutes a day. 

By using Dialer, physicians are able to connect with five more patients on average per week than before using the tool. Doximity Dialer also allows physicians to keep track of who they are calling, and when they called them, through the “Recent Calls” button. With this new integration, physicians can now reach patients faster and more conveniently than ever before. 

“In the past I would avoid making phone calls to patients from my cell phone, and wait until I was at the hospital – but that was impractical at times. With this new application I can contact patients using my cell phone, and it looks like I’m calling from the hospital I work at. This is quite ideal,” said Doximity App Store Review

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mHealth Apps With CDS Can Help Doctors Make Quicker, Better Decisions  #hcsmeufr #esante #digitalhealth

mHealth Apps With CDS Can Help Doctors Make Quicker, Better Decisions  #hcsmeufr #esante #digitalhealth | M-HEALTH  By PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
A review of an mHealth app designed by the CDC finds that apps with clinical decision support can help doctors more better decisions on ordering labs and tests.

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Florian Morandeau's curator insight, April 26, 1:21 AM

mHealth helps physicians in their diagnostic decision-making.

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mHealth Economics 2017 – Current Status and Future Trends in Mobile Health #esante #hcsmeufr

mHealth Economics 2017 – Current Status and Future Trends in Mobile Health #esante #hcsmeufr | M-HEALTH  By PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it

1. About the mHealth Economics program

The mHealth Economics program has been exploring the developments of digital health for 7 years now, and counting. Since the first report on the mobile health app market, a total of 6.7 million data points have been revealed, which illustrate mHealth and digital health market developments dating back as far as 2010. The mHealth Economics program is the largest digital health research program globally, with more than 15,000 participants since its beginnings. This is the first of two reports of the mHealth Economics Program 2017/2018. Download the 2nd report (How To Monetize Mobile Health Apps) for free here.

The aim of the program is to reveal current market conditions, and future trends in the digital health arena. It examines how successful mHealth app publishers are operating, how the market is changing, and where it is heading. In doing so, the report helps stakeholders to understand current and future market developments.

15,000 participants since 2010

Each year the program emphasizes several trending topics relevant to digital health. For 2017/2018, trending topics include; digital health business models, typical project budgets and digital health accelerator programs. Also new to this yearsprogram is the release of not only one, but several free-to-download reports.

The mHealth Economics program go-to resource for all digital health stakeholders

This year more than 2,400 decision makers and experts in mobile and digital health have partaken in the market survey and have contributed to this years report.

The majority of digital health practitioners come from Europe (47%) and the US (36%). 11% come from the Asian-Pacific region, and only a small share from South America and Africa.

 


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Une App mobile plus efficace qu’un scanner pour détecter la récidive d’un cancer du poumon #esante #hcsmeufr 

Une App mobile plus efficace qu’un scanner pour détecter la récidive d’un cancer du poumon #esante #hcsmeufr  | M-HEALTH  By PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it

Une simple application mobile de recueil d’informations de la part d’un patient serait-elle plus efficace qu’un coûteux scanner ? C’est ce qu’affirme le docteur Fabrice Denis, cancérologue, président du syndicat national des radiothérapeutes oncologues et chercheur associé au Coria CNRS. Il a pris la parole à l’occasion de l’événement Paris Health Care Weeek, qui s'est tenu à Paris du 29 au 31 mai.


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Patients feel engaged, supported by mHealth after outpatient surgery

Patients feel engaged, supported by mHealth after outpatient surgery | M-HEALTH  By PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
Patients who used a mobile health (mHealth) application for follow-ups on post-operative recovery felt engaged and supported, according to a study published May 25 in JMIR mHealth and uHealth.

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Florian Morandeau's curator insight, June 1, 1:16 AM

Using mHealth to support patients and improve recovery following outpatient surgery.

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mHealth Tools Can Play a Role in Managing Schizophrenia Treatment #hcsmeufr #esante #digitalhealth

mHealth Tools Can Play a Role in Managing Schizophrenia Treatment #hcsmeufr #esante #digitalhealth | M-HEALTH  By PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
A new study adds to the library of evidence that mHealth can be used to help people with schizophrenia and other mental illnesses manage their care.

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Florian Morandeau's curator insight, May 31, 1:14 AM

mHealth tools, including apps and wearables, can be used to help people with severe mental illnesses like schizophrenia manage their treatment.

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Santé connectée : une sélection d'applis au quotidien #Esante #hcsmeufr #Msante 

Santé connectée : une sélection d'applis au quotidien #Esante #hcsmeufr #Msante  | M-HEALTH  By PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
Les applications peuvent aider à adopter une bonne hygiène de vie et participer à la prévention. À condition de bien les choisir et de les utiliser régulièrement. Notre sélection, extraite de Sciences et Avenir 855, daté mai 2018.

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GIE_GERS's curator insight, May 15, 3:35 AM

Santé connectée : une sélection d'applis au quotidien #Esante #hcsmeufr #Msante 

Les applications peuvent aider à adopter une bonne hygiène de vie et participer à la prévention. À condition de bien les choisir et de les utiliser régulièrement. Notre sélection, extraite de Sciences et Avenir 855, daté mai 2018.

 

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#Esante #Msante Une application pour smartphone prédit les taux de concentration de pollen dans votre ville #Asthme #Rhinite #hcsmeufr 

#Esante #Msante Une application pour smartphone prédit les taux de concentration de pollen dans votre ville #Asthme #Rhinite #hcsmeufr  | M-HEALTH  By PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
Une jeune entreprise toulousaine a lancé une application permettant de prédire les taux de concentration de pollens dans les villes. En France, 30% de la population souffrent d'allergie aux pollens. 

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GIE_GERS's curator insight, May 10, 3:43 AM

Une jeune entreprise toulousaine a lancé une application permettant de prédire les taux de concentration de pollens dans les villes. En France, 30% de la population souffrent d'allergie aux pollens. 

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Quantifier la sévérité de la maladie de Parkinson grâce à un smartphone? #hcsmeufr #esante 

Quantifier la sévérité de la maladie de Parkinson grâce à un smartphone? #hcsmeufr #esante  | M-HEALTH  By PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
Le mobile Parkinson Disease score pourrait permettre d'évaluer, grâce à une application pour smartphone, la sévérité des symptômes moteurs chez les patients atteints de maladie de Parkinson, suggère une étude publiée dans la revue JAMA Neurology.

Les méthodes actuelles d'évaluation de la maladie de Parkinson sont "subjectives", "expérimentateur-dépendantes" et nécessitent d'être réalisées à l'hôpital, soulignent Andong Zhan de la Johns Hopkins University à Baltimore (Maryland) et ses collègues, estimant que les essais cliniques reposant sur ces mesures sont par conséquent longs, chers et à l'origine de faux-positifs ou de faux-négatifs.

Or, nombre de symptômes moteurs de la maladie de Parkinson sont compatibles avec une évaluation objective par smartphone, soulignent-ils.

Dans leur étude, ils se sont attachés à développer un système permettant d'évaluer la sévérité des symptômes moteurs de la maladie de Parkinson, le mobile Parkinson Disease score (mPDS), à partir d'une application pour smartphone.


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e-santé - E-thyroïde : L’appli de suivi des pathologies thyroïdiennes #hcsmeufr #esante 

e-santé - E-thyroïde : L’appli de suivi des pathologies thyroïdiennes #hcsmeufr #esante  | M-HEALTH  By PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
Whatsupdoc-lemag.fr...

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Jean-Christophe Lévêque's curator insight, May 7, 6:34 AM

Nouvelle application pour le suivi des patients ayant des troubles de la thyroïde. Notée honorablement par le label mhealth Quality. #hcsmeufr #MBAMCI

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Evaluation of smartphone‐based testing to generate exploratory outcome measures in a phase 1 Parkinson's disease clinical trial - Lipsmeier - - Movement Disorders - Wiley Online Library  #hcsmeufr ...

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La Santé Connectée a de l’avenir  #hcsmeufr #esante 

La Santé Connectée a de l’avenir  #hcsmeufr #esante  | M-HEALTH  By PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
L’institut GfK publie son étude consommateurs ‘’La Référence des Equipements Connectés (REC), consac...

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Les usages du mobile à la loupe  #hcsmeufr #esante 

Les usages du mobile à la loupe  #hcsmeufr #esante  | M-HEALTH  By PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
PayPlug, solution de paiement en ligne des petites et moyennes entreprises, publie son décryptage des tendances et usages mobiles.

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How to Test Digital Health Literacy in Older Adult Patients  #hcsmeufr #esante #digitalhealth

How to Test Digital Health Literacy in Older Adult Patients  #hcsmeufr #esante #digitalhealth | M-HEALTH  By PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it

"Conducting digital health literacy assessments via the telephone yields more stable results for older adult patient populations.

October 30, 2017 - Administering digital health literacy assessments via the telephone presents an opportunity to understand older patient internet use and online health information seeking, according to a recent study in the Journal of Medical Internet Research.

More patients, especially those over the age of 50, are using the internet to access information about their own health than ever before. However, the breadth of digital information increases the likelihood that a patient will encounter misinformation. It is thus critical for healthcare professionals to understand the internet use habits and abilities of older patients.

“Greater Internet adoption has increased the availability of health information for consumers, yet disparities in access to relevant online health information persist, especially among users with insufficient skills to discriminate between credible and fraudulent online health information,” the researchers explained.

Administering a patient health literacy assessment is useful for understanding these patient characteristics. eHealth literacy assessments, such as the 8-item eHEALS assessment, look at patient abilities to seek, find, understand, and appraise health information from online sources.

But efforts to obtain answers from older patients often hit roadblocks. Older patients don’t usually like to complete survey items on an electronic form or on a paper questionnaire.

READ MORE: How Digital, Health Literacy Drives mHealth Patient Engagement

Instead, conducting these surveys via the telephone proves effective, the research team has found.

In a test of nearly 300 patients over the age of 50, the research team found that telephone eHEALS assessments are equally effective as the survey administered over other media.

“Assessing consumer comfort and self-efficacy in using technology to access online health resources can help identify skill gaps and gauge the likelihood that users will be successful when using the Internet to access relevant health information,” the researchers observed.

“Results from this study suggest that administering eHEALS to older adults via telephone produces a reliable measure with scores that possess sufficient construct validity evidence.”

The researchers also pointed out a few specific findings about the patient characteristics tested in eHEALS. Notably, the team found that three scales for eHealth literacy are correlated with one another.

READ MORE: The Difference Between Patient Education and Health Literacy

Those three scales relate to utility of health information for patients and confidence in using health information. The correlated survey features include the following:

- I know how to use the health information I find on the internet to help me


- I know how to use the internet to answer my questions about health


- I feel confident in using information from the internet to make health decisions


“These three factors showed moderate to high correlations with one another,” the researchers explained. “The relationship between personal motivations for health information seeking and an individual’s perceived capability to use digital technologies can be affected by online environments with socially persuasive forms of media.”

The eHEALS assessment also tends to capture more information about older patients with high digital health literacy than those with low digital health literacy, the team found. It could be valuable for the assessment to include more survey measures to glean information about patients with limited digital health literacy to better target interventions to improve online information seeking.

“Among older adults, however, there is potential for additional underlying subscales to measure older adults’ confidence to locate, use, and evaluate online health information,” the researchers concluded.

“As older Internet users continue to visit online support groups and discussion forums to find new information about health care perspectives and experiences, it will be important to consider modifying the original eHEALS to adequately measure online health information-seeking behaviors in older populations.”

READ MORE: Patient Pre-Registration Tips for a Quality Consumer Experience

With more health information available via the internet, it will be important for healthcare professionals to understand how patients interact with that information.

A 2013 report from Pew Research Center found that 35 percent of patients have used an online resource to understand their health or obtain a diagnosis. Forty-six percent of those patients said their online self-diagnosis led them to seek medical attention, while 38 percent said they allowed the symptoms to run their course, Pew found.

These well-meaning online searches can have negative consequences. Patients with limited ability to discern quality online health information may develop misdiagnoses. And if those patients are part of the 38 percent of patients who allow online diagnoses to run their course, patients may face serious health side effects.

Healthcare professionals must understand patient online search habits and how patients vet their online sources to counter these online health search risks. Providers can then equip patients with better search habits and resources by establishing a baseline assessment about patient digital health literacy."


Via VAB Traductions
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