6- HOSPITAL 2.0 by PHARMAGEEK
31.3K views | +1 today
Follow
6- HOSPITAL 2.0 by PHARMAGEEK
#hospital #hopital #clinic #socialmedia #healthcare #pharma #ehealth #mhealth
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
Scoop.it!

MON HOPITAL EST SUR TWITTER ..UNE RENCONTRE AVEC LE CHRU DE LILLE - PHARMAGEEK #JTCV #hcsmeufr cc @chru_lille

MON HOPITAL EST SUR TWITTER ..UNE RENCONTRE AVEC LE CHRU DE LILLE - PHARMAGEEK #JTCV #hcsmeufr cc @chru_lille | 6- HOSPITAL 2.0 by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

Why crowdsourced hospital reviews often don't reflect actual quality—and how hospitals should respond

Why crowdsourced hospital reviews often don't reflect actual quality—and how hospitals should respond | 6- HOSPITAL 2.0 by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it

A study published in the Health Services Research journal found that crowdsourced ratings websites—such as Yelp, Google Reviews, and Facebook—are good indicators of individual patient experience, but they don't reliably reflect patient quality and patient safety, Christopher Cheney reports for HealthLeaders Media.

Cheat sheet: Your guide to responding to online reviews 

The problem with crowdsourced reviews

For the study, researchers compared ratings from nearly 3,000 acute care hospitals posted on Yelp, Google Reviews, and Facebook to scores from Hospital Compare—a CMS website that uses Medicare claims data and 57 metrics to rate hospitals on patient experience, patient safety, and clinical quality.

 

 

The researchers found about half of the top-rated hospitals on social media sites were also among the best-rated by Hospital Compare's overall rating. On the other hand, about 20% of the top-rated hospitals on social media were among the worst-rated by Hospital Compare's overall rating.

Victoria Perez, a co-author of the study and assistant professor at Indiana University, said, "For the most part, what we found is that the social media scores tell us about patient experience, but they don't tell us about the best and worst hospitals on the basis of clinical quality or patient safety."

How hospitals can use the study's findings

While research suggests that crowdsourced ratings don't always accurately represent a hospital's clinical quality, Cheney writes that reviews in venues such as Yelp are very accessible for patients, which means they often can color patients' views of a hospital's quality of care.

Perez said, "We wish that people would understand that even if hospitals are not scoring well on Facebook in user reviews, they could have excellent clinical scores."

According to Perez, hospitals can neutralize the negative crowdsource ratings by refocusing patients' attention to measures of clinical quality and patient safety. "Hospitals can advertise that they score well on Hospital Compare and establish marketing strategies to respond to social media scores," Perez explained.

She recommended hospitals post their Hospital Compare clinical quality and patient safety scores on their websites and social media pages (Cheney, Health Leaders Media, 9/10).


Via Plus91
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
Scoop.it!

Rendez-vous les 13 et 14 novembre pour accélérer l’usage du numérique en santé sur les territoires #esante #hcsmeufr 

Les 13 et 14 novembre prochains à Paris, les Journées e-Santé 360 seront l’un des événements majeurs pour tous les porteurs de projets en santé numérique. Un événement qui s’inscrit dans la parfaite continuité du plan « Ma santé 2022 » présenté en septembre dernier.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
Scoop.it!

A l’hôpital Broca à Paris, des robots de compagnie pour les personnes âgées #esante #hcsmeufr

A l’hôpital Broca à Paris, des robots de compagnie pour les personnes âgées #esante #hcsmeufr | 6- HOSPITAL 2.0 by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
A Paris, un laboratoire intégré à l’hôpital Broca expérimente l’usage des robots sociaux pour les personnes atteintes de la maladie d’Alzheimer et de syndromes apparentés.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
Scoop.it!

"Comment mesurer la qualité des soins à l'hôpital" - L'Express

"Comment mesurer la qualité des soins à l'hôpital" - L'Express | 6- HOSPITAL 2.0 by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
Pour le Pr Alain Bernard*, chef de pôle au CHU de Dijon, la France doit rattraper son retard dans l'évaluation des soins.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
Scoop.it!

Cette semaine, 25 opérations ont permis aux startups françaises de lever près de 85 millions d’euros.

Cette semaine, 25 opérations ont permis aux startups françaises de lever près de 85 millions d’euros. | 6- HOSPITAL 2.0 by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
Chaque semaine, Maddyness dresse le bilan des levées de fonds de la semaine qui vient de s’écouler. Cette semaine, 25 opérations ont permis aux startups françaises de lever près de 85 millions d’euros.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek from Tout et Rein by renaloo.com
Scoop.it!

Un "trip advisor" des hôpitaux, vraiment ?

Un "trip advisor" des hôpitaux, vraiment ? | 6- HOSPITAL 2.0 by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it

A l'étranger, l'évaluation des soins a permis d'en améliorer la qualité. En France, le mouvement va-t-il enfin s'enclencher ?

Plus de 40% de réduction de la mortalité post-opératoire pour un cancer colorectal en quatre ans aux Pays-Bas. La mortalité par infarctus du myocarde divisée par deux en un peu moins de dix ans en Suède. Ou encore, toujours en Suède, une diminution de 23% des ré-interventions après la pose d'une prothèse de la hanche... Comment expliquer l'amélioration spectaculaire de la qualité des soins constatée dans ces pays ? "Avant tout par la mise en place de registres d'activité et d'indicateurs de résultats, constate Grégory Katz, économiste et professeur à l'Université de Médecine Paris-Descartes. Les équipes hospitalières ont pu se comparer, puis aligner leurs pratiques sur les meilleures d'entre elles." 


Via Renaloo
more...
Renaloo's curator insight, September 20, 12:29 PM

Un "trip advisor" des hôpitaux, vraiment ?

Rescooped by Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek from "Patient empowerment through digital health - ehealth - connected health - patient portals - EHR - Health IT - digital hospitals - artificial intelligence (AI) & healthcare | medicine" by VAB Traductions
Scoop.it!

Apple vs. Android: Which does your hospital's innovation strategy resemble? #hcsmeufr #esante #digitalhealth

Apple vs. Android: Which does your hospital's innovation strategy resemble? #hcsmeufr #esante #digitalhealth | 6- HOSPITAL 2.0 by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it

[USA]

"One has a moat surrounding its products no one can get through while the other offers an open operating system for all to use.

 

Apple and Android are famously known for two very different approaches to computing and innovation. Apple has tall castle walls and a moat surrounding its products and innovation strategy – no one can get through. Conversely, Android is open to one and all and encourages outsiders to innovate with its open operating system.

 

Health systems, hospitals and group practices must innovate to keep up with the fast-changing worlds of both healthcare and IT. And healthcare provider organizations on top of their game have innovation strategies in place to foster progress.

 

One question becomes: Does a healthcare organization keep its innovation methods close to the vest and closed like Apple or wide open to outside influences like Android?

 

Let’s take a look at the pros and cons of each approach.

Innovation the Android way

While different healthcare organizations have different approaches to innovation, open appears to be a popular route. New York’s Hospital for Special Surgery, for example, takes the Android path – wide open.

 

“As a mission-driven organization dedicated to advancing musculoskeletal health globally, we operate without the concern of competition often seen within more closed innovation models,” said Leonard Achan, RN, chief innovation officer at the Hospital for Special Surgery. “HSS is transitioning our business model and moving from a focus factory, as a single-service provider, a specialty hospital, to a knowledge factory.”

 

 

As a “knowledge factory,” the Hospital for Special Surgery is leveraging all of its intellectual property, know-how and clinical expertise as part of its evolution to caring for consumers, not just patients, before they even know they need the hospital. This means that its strategy includes not only “inside-out” innovations traditionally seen in academic medical centers – technology transfer – but also inviting the entrepreneurial community in to solve problems with the hospital that span across a consumer’s musculoskeletal lifecycle.

 

“These ‘outsiders’ then infuse HSS knowledge into their own ideas to create new products, companies and services that differentiate us and our offerings to the world,” Achan explained. “We would not be able to accomplish this if we had a closed model. Our longstanding appetite for experimentation and iterative learning in the clinical realm has transferred into our business development, commercialization and innovation practices.”

 

The hospital’s maturity in the field of musculoskeletal health as one of the leading experts in the field gives the hospital the confidence and “brand permission” to not worry about others executing ideas without the hospital, he added.

 

“While commercialization and shared economics are key drivers for our innovation strategy, we do not lose focus of our primary driving force for innovating , which is to get what HSS has to offer today on the upper east side of Manhattan to the rest of the world at scale without having to be at an arms distance to our patients or consumers,” he said.

Digging in the digital dirt

Like the Hospital for Special Surgery, Great Neck, New York-based health system Northwell Health maintains an Android-like open approach to innovation.

 

“Our strategy is definitely one of open collaboration – much the way advancements in the medical sciences have been made for centuries,” said Emily Kagan Trenchard, vice president of digital and innovation strategy at Northwell Health. “The possibilities of the digital age are being explored and developed in so many sectors, by more brilliant minds than any single company could ever hire alone.”

 

The wealth of that collective knowledge is what Northwell seeks to harness – bringing together ideas to germinate in what Northwell Chief Technology Officer Purna Prasad, MD, calls the health system’s “digital dirt.”

 

But there is a qualification to this open methodology.

 

“This is not to say that Northwell Health doesn’t also have a strong commitment to developing its own custom applications, algorithms and processes,” Trenchard said. “Innovation is a core pillar of our employee promise, and the brilliance of our workforce is a constant source of transformative ideas for our innovation pipeline.”

 

But to think that Northwell Health could innovate in seclusion, that it could lock itself in a room and still solve the complex and nuanced challenges of delivering care to the country’s largest metropolitan area, would be a hubris the health system could not afford, she added.

Apple and Android: The case for a little bit of both

Kris Wilson, CIO at Hilo Medical Center, which has achieved the HIMSS Analytics Electronic Medical Record Maturity Model Stage 7, discusses specific projects and the medical center’s approach to using open and closed mobile devices in innovative uses of IT.

 

“Our solution is mixed,” Wilson said. “In situations where we do not interact with PHI on the device and it only needs Internet access, we have used Android devices. For devices internal to the network or where PHI is used as part of the workflow, we use Apple devices or Windows 10 Enterprise-based tablets.”

 

These healthcare organizations lean toward an Android-like open approach to innovation. So what are the benefits of being open?

 

“An open approach to innovation has really enabled us to draw upon the best ideas from all sectors,” said Trenchard of Northwell Health. “We’re lucky to have a very strong ventures team that is adept at crafting the various kinds of collaborations, so we don’t have to limit ourselves in the types of partnerships we pursue.”

 

This openness not only brings Northwell into conversations with fascinating companies just beginning to think about healthcare, but it has introduced new revenue opportunities that Northwell might not have otherwise considered, she added.

 

“But perhaps the best part of this strategic approach is how much it aligns with our mission – doing this work with like-minded organizations builds a shared sense of purpose and helps us channel energy and attention to the needs of our communities,” she said. “And when partners take that shared knowledge back into their own sectors, we’re not just innovating on behalf of those who come to Northwell, we’re transforming care delivery for the industry as a whole.”

 

The Hospital for Special Surgery’s organizational culture is built upon shared leadership, collaboration and solving problems by getting the smartest, most talented people in a room to innovate, Achan said.

 

“For our environment, these practices allow us to challenge each other every day and achieve more together,” he said. “We strive to continue to not only sustain our success, but to manage the tension between maintaining what currently works and experimenting to see what we are capable of. Being proprietary and operating in a closed environment will not allow the creative process to thrive. It will not allow the flexibility to establish an atmosphere that supports value innovation.”

 

The benefit of sharing and letting others in “de-risks” the hospital from feeling comfort with complacency, Achan said. The open innovation model helps the hospital learn about its own creativity, capabilities and possibilities while remaining humble enough to know that it does not have all the answers in-house and must collaborate with the community to truly improve healthcare for global consumers, he said.

Android approach has big benefits but challenges, too

At a micro level, the benefits of open versus closed are very clear.

“Where possible, being open is much more cost-effective,” said Wilson of Hilo Medical Center. “The devices are less expensive and we are able to provide devices to a large number of users without impact to the budget. With the closed devices, security threats are far more manageable. System security updates are released frequently, often making it easier to keep these devices up to date.”

 

But as one would expect, there are challenges to having an open approach to innovation. One cannot open their doors to the world and expect no issues to arise.

“Healthcare provider environments are not structured, staffed or equipped to drive open innovation models at scale and speed,” said Achan of the Hospital for Special Surgery. “We are limited by our own policies, procedures, practices and regulations that do not allow for frictionless creativity. Open innovation is often misunderstood as it requires creatives to execute strategies that are not common to hospital practices and procedures.”

 

It often cannot be put into a box that can be explained and this allows for models like these to be short-lived or not supported enough to thrive in environments, he added.

 

“Closed strategies can more easily be explained, tracked and quantified and may translate well in more traditional organizations,” Achan said. “These are the reasons many provider-based executives and leadership do not move in this direction, even if they think they are.”

 

One of the biggest challenges in taking an open approach to innovation is keeping one’s strategic focus, said Trenchard of Northwell Health.

 

“There are so many opportunities we could pursue and there are many talented people with big ideas on how to make healthcare better,” she explained. “Which ones should we pursue and why? What about those fantastic ideas that we simply don’t have the resources to develop at this time? How can we set them up to incubate without having them build products that don’t align with our core platform?”

 

Another challenge of the open model, she added, is the time it takes to set the right structure for collaboration.

 

“We’ve been lucky to have partners in our legal division who share our passion for this kind of work,” she said. “But it is a lot of time upfront to ensure that everyone feels comfortable with how the fruits of our creative labor will be shared.”


Via VAB Traductions
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek from Santé NTIC
Scoop.it!

Journée régionale "Hôpital 2.0" | ANFH  #hcsmeufr #esante 

Journée régionale "Hôpital 2.0" | ANFH  #hcsmeufr #esante  | 6- HOSPITAL 2.0 by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
CONTEXTE : La transformation digitale ou révolution numérique, touche l’ensemble de notre société. Chaque année les outils du numérique évoluent et nos usages changent avec eux. L’établissement de santé n’est pas épargné par ce mouvement et doit s’adapter, tant bien que mal, à cette nouvelle ère. Il s’agira alors, de saisir les nouvelles possibilités d’agir, offertes par les outils numériques mais aussi les risques. Que ce soit à travers les usages personnels ou au regard de la sécurité des systèmes d’information (SI), le numérique pose un ensemble de questions, que chaque établissements de santé doit faire siennes, afin de prendre le bon virage. E-santé, organisations, formation, éthique professionnelle… voilà autant de sujets que la nouvelle ère du numérique nous pousse à remettre en question.   OBJECTIFS DE LA JOURNÉE : Cette journée vise à balayer de façon globale, la place du numérique dans les établissements publics de santé. A travers des interventions et des retours d’expérience, il s’agira de se demander comment accompagner les organisations actuelles face à la transformation digitale en cours. Cette rencontre sera aussi l’occasion de présenter deux dispositifs ANFH qui ont trait au sujet : PRODIG’ et son offre de formation « Serious games » et « e-learning » ;  Ethique 2.0 pour accompagner les agents vers des usages numériques responsables.

Via Doc-Ifsi-Narbonne
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
Scoop.it!

Le programme HOPE 2019 est lancé ! 

Le programme HOPE 2019 est lancé !  | 6- HOSPITAL 2.0 by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
Le Programme HOPE 2019 vient de démarrer. Ce programme d'échange permet aux managers hospitaliers d'enrichir leurs compétences par une expérience à l'étranger et bénéficie également aux établissements qui les accueillent. Les candidats à cette expérience doivent satisfaire à un agenda précis. Première deadline, le 31 octobre 2018…
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
Scoop.it!

Perception des Français sur l'hôpital et la santé à l'occasion de la Paris Healthcare Week #hcsmeufr #esante 

Perception des Français sur l'hôpital et la santé à l'occasion de la Paris Healthcare Week #hcsmeufr #esante  | 6- HOSPITAL 2.0 by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
L'Opinion tranchée
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
Scoop.it!

Les établissements jugent prioritaires les innovations numériques facilitant l'accès aux soins et les collaborations (enquête) #hcsmeufr #esante 

Les établissements jugent prioritaires les innovations numériques facilitant l'accès aux soins et les collaborations (enquête) #hcsmeufr #esante  | 6- HOSPITAL 2.0 by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
Premier site français d’information en continu sur les technologies de l’information et de la communication (TIC, NTIC) dans la santé
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

AI ambulances and robot doctors: China seeks digital salve to ease hospital strain  #esante #hcsmeufr #digitalhealth

AI ambulances and robot doctors: China seeks digital salve to ease hospital strain  #esante #hcsmeufr #digitalhealth | 6- HOSPITAL 2.0 by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it

In the eastern Chinese city of Hangzhou, an ambulance speeds through traffic on a wave of green lights, helped along by an artificial intelligence (AI) system and big data.

 
 
A woman touches a screen on a robot developed by iFlytek at the outpatient hall of People's Liberation Army General Hospital in Beijing, China March 16, 2017. Zhao Naiming/Qianlong.com via REUTERS

The system, which involves sending information to a centralized computer linked to the city’s transport networks, is part of a trial by Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. The Chinese tech giant is hoping to use its cloud and data systems to tackle issues hobbling China’s healthcare system like snarled city traffic, long patient queues and a lack of doctors.

Alibaba’s push into healthcare reflects a wider trend in China, where technology firms are racing to shake up a creaking state-run health sector and take a slice of spending that McKinsey & Co estimates will hit $1 trillion by 2020.

Tencent-backed WeDoctor, which offers online consultations and doctor appointments, raised $500 million in May at a valuation of $5.5 billion. Ping An Good Doctor, a similar platform backed by Ping An Insurance, raised $1.1 billion in an IPO this year.

“The opportunity is growing very fast,” said Min Wanli, the Hangzhou-based chief machine intelligence scientist at Alibaba’s cloud division.

Alibaba is working with a hospital in Shanghai using data to predict patient demand and allocate doctors. In Zhejiang province, the company is working on AI-assisted diagnosis tools to help analyze medical images such as CT scans and MRIs.

SPONSORED

 

“You need to go through very specialized training in order to read these images, but we know that experts are a very scarce resource,” said Min.

Chinese hospitals are increasingly using technology to bridge the gap between urban centers and remote parts of the country where doctors are in short supply. Using document-sharing systems and livestreaming video, specialists can direct more junior medical staff on-site doing patient diagnoses.

DXY, one of China’s biggest online networks of doctors, offers consultations on the WeChat social media platform for patients with chronic diseases such as diabetes, with a team of nurses and doctors providing medical advice.

China is pressing to reduce healthcare costs that are soaring as the population ages, putting huge strains on the state insurance system.

At the same time, Beijing has been promising better access to healthcare and improved grass-roots care - despite a lack of family doctors - which has brought technology into the spotlight as a way of maximizing stretched resources.

“Educating doctors is going to take too long,” said Rogier Janssens, Beijing-based general manager of Germany’s Merck KGaA’s biopharma business in China. He added that smartphones could help deliver primary care faster and cheaper.

“There are hundreds of millions of people who still go without care for relatively simple diseases.”

 
 
FILE PHOTO: Screens showing traffic data of Hangzhou city are seen during a media tour of City Brain, an AI-powered traffic-management system by Alibaba Cloud, in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, China April 10, 2018. REUTERS/Stringer/File Photo

China’s healthcare system has long grappled with a shortage of doctors, exacerbated by low wages and a dearth of local clinics and general practitioners. That means patients often crowd into large, specialist hospitals for even minor ailments.

Beijing has been trying to fix the problem, setting targets to increase the number of family doctors across the country.

However, the government has been slow to embrace technology within the healthcare system, held back by the challenge of digitalizing a sprawling, fragmented hospital system still dominated by public hospitals and state-run firms.

ONLINE DRUG SALES

The policy winds may be starting to change. Beijing has enacted legislation over the last two years that has included strong support for internet-based basic healthcare services.

Premier Li Keqiang said this year that healthcare tech could “help alleviate the problem of inaccessible and expensive public health services that have long been a big concern”.

Now, Beijing may be about approve the sale of some prescription drugs online, creating a major opportunity for local and global firms, according to companies in the sector.

Janssens of Merck KGaA said the company had “good indications” that policymakers were addressing the issue of pharmaceutical e-commerce “as we speak”.

Li Tiantian, the founder and chairman of DXY, said the health ministry had met with healthcare companies like his own and planned to soon release a policy on “internet hospitals”, which would open up some online sales.

“I think the new policy will be released very soon, potentially in July,” he said.

The policy would allow approved hospitals to consult, prescribe and sell drugs to chronic disease patients online. However, regulatory concerns over safety and pushback from state-run distributors sank a similar plan several years ago.

Li added that Ningxia autonomous region, in north-central China, had already been approving some internet hospital providers on a test basis.

Global drugmakers are taking notice. A move to open up online sales - if approved nationwide - would help shake up a drug market dominated by state-owned distributors and public hospitals, where most medicines are still prescribed and sold.

Merck KGaA, for example, recently announced a tie-up with Alibaba Health focused on systems to help track medicines to avoid counterfeiting, but also on online drug sales and potential direct-to-patient sales online.

 
 
FILE PHOTO - A screen displaying Tencent Miying, an AI-powered medical imaging service, is seen next to visitors at the fourth World Internet Conference in Wuzhen, Zhejiang province, China, December 3, 2017. REUTERS/Aly Song/File Photo

FALSE HOPE?

In the United States, technology firms like Amazon, Google and Apple have made pushes into healthcare, with mixed results, often finding sprawling medical markets tougher to crack than entertainment or media.

Technology firms in China also face major obstacles.

One is convincing patients to see doctors online or getting hospitals to spend extra money on high-tech tools that promise efficiency boosts or improvements for patients. And regulators still have concerns about drug sales online.

Doctors and industry insiders also said that technology alone could not solve the issues facing the sector.

“Technology is important but is not enough on its own,” said DXY’s Li, a former doctor. He said the most immediate benefit was creating new channels for simple primary care.

Wang Aihu, a cardiologist at Beijing Chaoyang Hospital, said medical centers were increasingly using online appointment and payment systems, and that he conducted internet consultations for patients in remote regions.

 

He added that his hospital may eventually have “AI-powered medical imaging systems or robot doctors”, but these could not replace medical staff.

“These promising technologies will help accelerate and improve diagnoses, but will not replace good doctors, who are still needed to verify and correct diagnostic results,” he said.

That hasn’t stopped one hospital in Beijing doing a “man vs machine” standoff this month to detect neurological disorders including brain tumors. A robot developed by the prestigious Tsinghua University and iFlytek, a local firm, has also taken and passed China’s medical exam for doctors.

For most people in China, however, AI ambulances and robot doctors may need to wait a bit longer.

Tony Li, 55, a cancer patient in Shanghai, said he had seen little cutting-edge tech in Chinese hospitals in regular visits over the past few years.

“From what I heard, some of the newest technologies can help doctors identify tumors at earlier stages, and that’s great,” he said. “But the internet has a tendency of exaggerating things, giving us enormous false hope.”

Alibaba Cloud’s Min acknowledged the company was still working to prove the value of its technology, and that many hospital administrators were still suspicious of things like cloud computing.

 

But, he said, “In China, once a new technology is proven useful then everybody is crazy about it.”


Via Plus91
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek from Management de Santé
Scoop.it!

Le patient acteur de sa Santé au cœur de la réflexion des DIrecteurs de soins

Le patient acteur de sa Santé au cœur de la réflexion des DIrecteurs de soins | 6- HOSPITAL 2.0 by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
Le patient acteur de sa prise en charge est un sujet très actuel dans la réflexion globale menée pour faire face à l'essor des maladies chroniques notamment. Il a fait l'objet de trois ateliers lors des Journées nationales des directeurs de soins. Il a été question de patient expert en santé mentale, d'innovation pédagogique intégrant le patient ou de la qualité du projet de vie des usagers.

Via RECIPRO RH
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek from "Autonomisation & capacitation du patient (francophonie) : littératie en santé - ETP - patients experts - Promotion de la santé - Droits des patients - esanté - santé digitale - epatients - TIC et hôpital numérique - IA et santé " by VAB Traductions
Scoop.it!

TecHopital - "Les ingénieurs biomédicaux devraient plus s'impliquer dans la construction des hôpitaux" (Claude Rolland)

TecHopital - "Les ingénieurs biomédicaux devraient plus s'impliquer dans la construction des hôpitaux" (Claude Rolland) | 6- HOSPITAL 2.0 by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it

[FRANCE]

LA ROCHELLE, 8 octobre 2018 (APMnews) -

"Je souhaiterais que les ingénieurs biomédicaux s'impliquent plus dans les projets de construction pour mieux anticiper leurs évolutions", a déclaré Claude Rolland, directeur du pôle santé chez Bouygues Construction, lors des journées de l'Association française des ingénieurs biomédicaux (Afib) 2018 à La Rochelle.

 

"Les hôpitaux français sont très optimisés, globalement fonctionnels, peu chers - deux fois moins chers que les autres établissements européens. Ils sont très bien sécurisés au niveau des installations techniques et respectent très bien les normes d'hygiène. Mais ils sont souvent peu accueillants et anticipent peu les nouvelles organisations et les nouvelles technologies", a regretté le 3 octobre Claude Rolland, invité des journées de l'ingénierie biomédicale qui se sont déroulées du mercredi 3 au vendredi 5 octobre à La Rochelle.

 

"Plus de 70% de patients sont des patients récurrents, des patients longue durée qu'on ne connaît pas. Or, les patients sont aussi des clients", a-t-il lancé aux ingénieurs hospitaliers. Si les "installations techniques" sont "très bien sécurisées", la réanimation, les soins intensifs, les blocs opératoires sont "très technologiques, très performants et respectent les normes d'hygiène", en revanche les "chambres sont tristes, peu accueillantes".

 

"Pour réfléchir sur comment mieux concevoir, mieux exploiter les hôpitaux de demain, nous avons donc lancé une étude à l'horizon 2025 afin de mieux comprendre quelles seront les évolutions technologiques, les évolutions organisationnelles à venir", a-t-il complété.

Le directeur du pôle santé de Bouygues a rappelé le fait qu'il "faut au minimum 10 ans pour concevoir et construire un hôpital et qu'il faut donc anticiper les évolutions technologiques, prévoir l'évolution des patients", "intégrer la révolution digitale" en cours et son "impact sur les établissements de santé".

 

Paradoxalement, "avec le développement de l'ambulatoire, la surface des bâtiments de santé reste la même". Le nombre de lits diminue mais les surfaces se maintiennent, "afin de mieux gérer les flux". "Nous allons vers un modèle d'aéroport, de centres commerciaux. Il va falloir mieux accueillir les patients, mieux les traiter, il faut donc des espaces pour cela."

Le centre hospitalier du futur devra donc être "basé sur une structure modulable avec une marche en avant des patients, dans un environnement plus convivial. Des flux simples, orientés vers la productivité mais aussi des espaces sereins pour mettre le patient dans de bonnes conditions". Et celui-ci d'ajouter : "On voit d'ailleurs se développer des espaces 'cocooning' au Japon, en Suisse, au Royaume-Uni".

 

Les capacités d'imagerie ont beaucoup changé, la chirurgie a beaucoup évolué avec la réalité augmentée, la chirurgie sous imagerie. Le bloc opératoire devient très évolutif, avec des besoins informatiques très importants. Or, actuellement, "au niveau des appels d'offres on reçoit encore des programmes très restrictifs".

 

Dans les hôpitaux français, "tous les blocs opératoires ont été construits à l'étage, aucune salle ne possède une tonne de charge au plancher. Et refaire ces salles après coup, coûte une fortune", a-t-il fait remarquer. "On nous demande de faire des salles de bloc de plus en plus petites alors que les salles hybrides nécessitent de grands espaces à cause des appareils d'imagerie."

 

"Il faut anticiper les évolutions technologiques, anticiper les flux et pour cela nous avons besoin des ingénieurs biomédicaux", a martelé Claude Rolland.

"Les halls d'accueil, la salle d'attente, les chambre pourraient être plus accueillants." Dans les nouveaux projets, Bouygues Construction travaille de plus en plus avec des architectes d'intérieurs qui rajoutent de la décoration "très facile à faire et qui ne coûte pas très cher". Et le directeur de Bouygues de citer l'exemple de l'hôpital de Calais et rappelé qu'à l'étranger, comme au Japon, au Royaume-Uni, dans les pays nordiques et la Suisse, "on voit de la lumière qui entre, des matériaux très agréables, de la décoration, on soigne la qualité d'accueil".

 

Geneviève De Lacour


Via VAB Traductions
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

Can Yelp help you find a hospital — a good one? #esante #hcsmeufr

Can Yelp help you find a hospital — a good one? #esante #hcsmeufr | 6- HOSPITAL 2.0 by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it

Looking for a restaurant recommendation? A hair salon? A tailor?

Online review sites such as Yelp have become the go-to places to research so many kinds of businesses.

But what about hospitals? Can you click your way to the best hospital for you?

A new study out of Indiana University suggests that when it comes to patient experience, crowdsourced review websites are a decent barometer. But although Yelp may be able to tell you how friendly the staff was or how responsive the billing office was, these reviews won't do much to help you gauge other important qualities, such as patient safety and quality of care.

 

Still, patients are increasingly turning to social media and crowdsourced reviews to inform their decisions about where to go for care. That — as well as increased attention by Medicare to patient surveys —  is changing how hospitals factor patient opinion into their business models.

Hospitals are hiring patient experience officers and building up social media teams to use such platforms to promote their brand, fend off negative publicity, and learn from feedback they may not be receiving directly through more formal patient surveys.

"The social sentiment can be extremely powerful when it comes to health-care decision-making, when it comes to health-care reputation," said Dwight McBee, the chief experience officer at Temple Health. "There's a lot of power in word of mouth, and we see that playing out in the online environment."

‘There’s no great tool’

Researchers at Indiana University aimed to compare hospital ratings from Yelp, Facebook, and Google against the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' Hospital Compare, a federal data-driven evaluation of hospital performance based on self-reported metrics and patient surveys.

 

Review sites, such as Yelp, are known for their hot and cold entries from people who  had either a great or terrible experience, not so much for middling reports. That could make them unreliable.

"We typically think when people write about other kinds of businesses, it's because they had an extreme experience — either they loved it or they hated it," said Victoria Perez, an assistant professor at Indiana University's School of Public and Environmental Affairs, who co-authored the study.

But researchers found that hospitals' crowdsourced rating lined up pretty well with their patient experience rating in Hospital Compare, Perez said.

The highest-ranked hospitals on crowdsourced sites were also the highest ranked in Hospital Compare's patient experience ratings 50 percent to 60 percent of the time, according to the study published in the peer-reviewed journal Health Services Research.

 

The federal patient survey asks questions about how well medical staff communicated with patients, whether they adequately explained medication and recovery instructions, and how quickly staff responded to requests for help — all experiences often described in Yelp reviews, too.

But researchers also found that 40 percent of the time, the hospitals with the highest crowdsourced ratings had among the lowest scores for patient safety and quality in Hospital Compare, such as pneumonia death rate and the number of patients who returned to the hospital within 30 days.

"When we think about what is a good hospital or a bad hospital, it's easy to get distracted by amenities that make your experience better," Perez said. "People may think those things are correlated, but we find, in fact, they're not correlated at all."

Hospital Compare may be a better source for information about important features such as infection rates, but the tool can be cumbersome for users who aren't sure how to navigate the dozens of metrics measured.

 

"There's no great tool. The lesson in all this is there's difficulty with all these reviews and comparison tools. There isn't a one-size-fits-all, but it's important for patients to do their homework," said Michael Consuelos, senior vice president of clinical integration for the Hospital and Healthsystem Association of Pennsylvania.

Using data from   Hospital Compare, the association developed its own database of Pennsylvania hospitals, called Care in Pennsylvania, where patients can compare hospital performance in specific areas, such as cardiac care or obstetrics

Hospitals use Yelp, too

Still, the trend of social media and online reviewing shows no sign of ending.

 
 

Main Line Health's social media team is constantly scanning such sites as Twitter and Facebook, as well as Yelp and other review sites, for patient comments. They respond to patients as quickly as they can — even if only to say "we're looking into it" — and relay comments to the relevant care units.

The real-time responses ensure that patients know that  their concerns are being taken seriously. More important, listening to patients is crucial to safety and quality, said Barbara Wadsworth, senior vice president of patient services and chief nursing officer at Main Line.

"You can have the best doctor or best nurse, but if they're not kind to the patient and the patient doesn't feel comfortable asking questions," they may not get the care they need, Wadsworth said.

Penn Medicine decided to "get ahead" of online review websites by integrating the reviews it collects from third-party patient surveys into doctor's profiles, said Craig Loundas, an associate vice president who leads patient experience.

A review committee weeds out comments deemed "slanderous," that call into question a doctor's clinical competency and could damage a reputation, so patients aren't getting a completely unfiltered view. This type of comment accounts for about 4 percent of  165,000 comments gathered. Any serious concerns are investigated internally, even if the comment isn't posted, Loundas said.

Online reviews often capture feedback that hospitals won't get from the scripted patient surveys they ask some people to complete, said Raina Merchant, director of Penn Medicine for Digital Health, who has studied how health systems can learn from Yelp.

For example, Yelp reviews are often written by the person who brought a friend or relative to the hospital. Caregivers are easy to overlook in a patient experience survey but could be crucial in deciding where a family goes for care, such as if an adult child is bringing a parent to the hospital.

"What these more crowdsourced sites add is additional, sometimes more nuanced, information that's also important," Merchant said. "We don't have a standardized way for asking about the views of the support people who come with you to the hospital."

Earlier this year, Temple Health launched a new "social listening" campaign that monitors 60 social media platforms and websites where patients may be talking about their experience at Temple. The exercise has produced some helpful lessons for staff, such as how much patients value even fleeting interactions with medical and administrative personnel.

"We've leaned into this new change and found it extremely beneficial," McBee said. "Those who don't choose to embrace this leave a lot of valuable feedback from their patients on the table."

• • •

The online tool  allows you to compare up to three hospitals. Charts compare local hospitals' ratings with state and national averages.

  • Hospital Compare evaluates hospitals on dozens of metrics and combines ratings in smaller categories into an overall five-star rating. So don't look at just the overall star rating — hospitals with an overall high star rating may not score as high in individual service areas.
  • Focus on metrics that are most relevant to your needs. For example, if you are pregnant, look specifically at a hospital's rating for early deliveries that weren't medically necessary. The tool also offers details on death rates, infection rates, and unplanned return visits for specific procedures, such as a knee replacement or heart attack.
  • Hospital Compare's "Timely and Effective Care" section includes metrics on emergency departments that could be useful if you live near multiple hospitals and want to establish a family emergency plan. Here you can see each hospitals' average ER wait times and patients who left without being seen, compared with state and national averages.

Via Plus91
more...
onlinepharmacy's curator insight, October 5, 10:19 AM

https://goldenskyonlinepharmacy.online/product/adhd-buy-adderall-online/
https://goldenskyonlinepharmacy.online/product/buy-generic-accutane-online/
https://goldenskyonlinepharmacy.online/product/buy-adipex-online/
https://goldenskyonlinepharmacy.online/product/buy-ambien-online/
https://goldenskyonlinepharmacy.online/product/buy-arimidex-online/
https://goldenskyonlinepharmacy.online/product/buy-ativan-online/
https://goldenskyonlinepharmacy.online/product/buy-bimatoprost-generic-online/
https://goldenskyonlinepharmacy.online/product/buy-clenbuterol-online/
https://goldenskyonlinepharmacy.online/product/buy-concerta-online/
https://goldenskyonlinepharmacy.online/product/buy-darvocet-online/
https://goldenskyonlinepharmacy.online/product/buy-demerol-online/
https://goldenskyonlinepharmacy.online/product/buy-dexedrine-online/
https://goldenskyonlinepharmacy.online/product/buy-dilaudid-online/
https://goldenskyonlinepharmacy.online/product/buy-generic-premarin-cream-online/
https://goldenskyonlinepharmacy.online/product/buy-generic-sporanox-online/
https://goldenskyonlinepharmacy.online/product/buy-ecstasy-online/
https://goldenskyonlinepharmacy.online/product/buy-hydrocodone-online/
https://goldenskyonlinepharmacy.online/product/buy-janumet-online/
https://goldenskyonlinepharmacy.online/product/buy-klonopin-online/
https://goldenskyonlinepharmacy.online/product/buy-lortab-online/
https://goldenskyonlinepharmacy.online/product/buy-lyrica-online/
https://goldenskyonlinepharmacy.online/product/buy-methadone-online/
https://goldenskyonlinepharmacy.online/product/buy-morphine-online/
https://goldenskyonlinepharmacy.online/product/buy-nexavar-online/
https://goldenskyonlinepharmacy.online/product/buy-oxycontin-online/
https://goldenskyonlinepharmacy.online/product/buy-phentermine-online/
https://goldenskyonlinepharmacy.online/product/buy-prozac-online/
https://goldenskyonlinepharmacy.online/product/buy-quaaludes-online/
https://goldenskyonlinepharmacy.online/product/buy-ritalin-online/
https://goldenskyonlinepharmacy.online/product/kids-collection/
https://goldenskyonlinepharmacy.online/product/buy-suboxone-online/
https://goldenskyonlinepharmacy.online/product/buy-tramadol-online/
https://goldenskyonlinepharmacy.online/product/buy-trazodone-online/
https://goldenskyonlinepharmacy.online/product/buy-tricor-online/
https://goldenskyonlinepharmacy.online/product/buy-valium-online/
https://goldenskyonlinepharmacy.online/product/buy-vicodin-online/
https://goldenskyonlinepharmacy.online/product/buy-vyvanse-online/
https://goldenskyonlinepharmacy.online/product/buy-xanax-online/
https://goldenskyonlinepharmacy.online/product/buy-zolpidem-online/
https://goldenskyonlinepharmacy.online/product/greenstone-xanax/
https://goldenskyonlinepharmacy.online/product/buy-percocets-online/

Rescooped by Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek from eHealth mHealth HealthTech innovations - Marketing Santé innovant
Scoop.it!

Reduce infections in your hospital with artificial intelligence

Reduce infections in your hospital with artificial intelligence | 6- HOSPITAL 2.0 by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
Surgical site infections are a serious problem at any hospital, but new tools are being used to predict the likelihood of them occurring – and saving lives in the process. One health system’s investment in artificial intelligence (AI) has paid off in both infection reductions and cost savings, to the tune of $1.2 million.

The University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics have used machine learning to reduce surgical site infections by 74% over the past three years, according to Healthcare IT News.
Integrating artificial intelligence

Working with vendor DASH Analytics, the organization is using the DASH Analytics High-Definition Care Platform (HDCP). The system integrates with the hospital’s electronic health records (EHR) system to measure the risk for individual patients.

It then decides on best practices for each patient and offers advice to the provider at specific points in the care process via the EHR.

When dealing specifically with surgical site infections, the machine uses the World Health Organization’s Surgical Safety Checklist to make sure the correct care protocol is being followed.

It also collects data from the EHR, such as which surgeon performed the procedure, how long the surgery lasted and blood loss estimates, and combines that info with the patient’s history.

Via Dominique Godefroy
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek from Doctors Hub
Scoop.it!

How hospitals can engage consumers to innovate a new patient experience #esante #hcsmeufr #digitalhealth

Executives from Dana Farber, Partners, BIDMC and Northwell share tips and insights about working with patients in the tech development process.
Via Philippe Marchal
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
Scoop.it!

À la une de DSIH N° 25 : Les groupes de cliniques peaufinent leur stratégie numérique

À la une de DSIH N° 25 : Les groupes de cliniques peaufinent leur stratégie numérique | 6- HOSPITAL 2.0 by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
       
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
Scoop.it!

24èmes Journées d’études et de Formation Hopitech : Co-construire l’hôpital de demain, les métiers #esante #hcsmeufr 

24èmes Journées d’études et de Formation Hopitech : Co-construire l’hôpital de demain, les métiers #esante #hcsmeufr  | 6- HOSPITAL 2.0 by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
Du 10 au 12 octobre 2018 se tiendront sur le parvis de la Grande Arche à la Défense les 24èmes Journées d’études et de Formation Hopitech, sur le thème "Co-construire l’hôpital de demain, les métiers supports au coeur des enjeux".
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek from "Autonomisation & capacitation du patient (francophonie) : littératie en santé - ETP - patients experts - Promotion de la santé - Droits des patients - esanté - santé digitale - epatients - TIC et hôpital numérique - IA et santé " by VAB Traductions
Scoop.it!

TecHopital - Team Doc*, l application qui veut simplifier la transmission médicale et la communication à l hôpital

TecHopital - Team Doc*, l application qui veut simplifier la transmission médicale et la communication à l hôpital | 6- HOSPITAL 2.0 by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it

PARIS, 1er août 2018 (TecHopital) - Créée en novembre 2017, la start-up Team'Doc propose une application et un support mobile aux médecins hospitaliers pour permettre une meilleure "transmission médicale, simplifier la communication entre médecins et apporter une actualisation des connaissances via du contenu médical à jour", a expliqué son cofondateur, le Dr Sacha Rozencwajg.

 
 

Via VAB Traductions
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek from Les actualités du GIE GERS - Groupement pour l'Elaboration et de Réalisation Statistiques
Scoop.it!

Occitanie: un #Ehpad public en pointe sur le #DMP #esante #hcsmeufr  

Occitanie: un #Ehpad public en pointe sur le #DMP #esante #hcsmeufr   | 6- HOSPITAL 2.0 by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
Premier site français d’information en continu sur les technologies de l’information et de la communication (TIC, NTIC) dans la santé

Via GIE_GERS
more...
GIE_GERS's curator insight, August 28, 7:32 AM

L'établissement public autonome Saint-Jacques, installé sur les sites de Grenade-sur-Garonne et de Cadours, propose le dossier médical partagé (DMP) à ses 225 résidents depuis fin 2017. Un déploiement pionnier en Haute-Garonne, qui prendra toute son ampleur en septembre, une fois l'interfaçage avec le logiciel de soins opérationnel, relate son directeur, Didier Carles, auprès de Gerontonews (site du groupe d'information APM International, dont fait partie TICsanté).

Rescooped by Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek from Doctors Hub
Scoop.it!

Japan plans 10 'AI hospitals' to ease doctor shortages  #hcsmeufr #esante #digitalhealth 

Japan plans 10 'AI hospitals' to ease doctor shortages  #hcsmeufr #esante #digitalhealth  | 6- HOSPITAL 2.0 by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it

The Japanese government is teaming up with businesses and academia to set up hospitals enhanced by artificial intelligence, seeking to allow short-handed doctors to spend more time on patient care while curbing medical spending.


Via Dominique Godefroy, Philippe Marchal
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek from Digital Health
Scoop.it!

What hospitals need for successful AI: a digital base #hcsmeufr #esante #digitalhealth

Artificial intelligence depends on several different fundamental technologies, and a robust and modernized infrastructure – cloud, mobile and web – to build upon is a must-have first step.

Via Florian Morandeau
more...
Florian Morandeau's curator insight, August 2, 1:16 AM

There are big opportunities ahead for AI-driven clinical and operational improvements.

Rescooped by Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek from GIE GERS - La DATA référence & (big)data en santé
Scoop.it!

Les #hôpitaux publics hésitent à s'engager dans l'externalisation de leur informatique #hcsmeufr 

Les #hôpitaux publics hésitent à s'engager dans l'externalisation de leur informatique #hcsmeufr  | 6- HOSPITAL 2.0 by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
Confrontés à des obligations de plus en plus fortes sur le plan informatique et sur la protection des données personnelles, les hôpitaux publics pourraient tirer profit d'une externalisation de leur système d'information, mais peu s'engagent encore sur cette voie, ont observé plusieurs représentants d'hébergeurs et d'éditeurs interrogés par TICsanté.

Via GIE_GERS
more...
GIE_GERS's curator insight, July 13, 1:11 PM

Confrontés à des obligations de plus en plus fortes sur le plan informatique et sur la protection des données personnelles, les hôpitaux publics pourraient tirer profit d'une externalisation de leur système d'information, mais peu s'engagent encore sur cette voie, ont observé plusieurs représentants d'hébergeurs et d'éditeurs interrogés par TICsanté.