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Resources for health, nursing, and associated fields.  [ Also see: http://www.healthforworld.com ]
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Wearable Tech will help us live longer | #Wearables #IoT

Wearable Tech will help us live longer | #Wearables #IoT | Perspectives on Health & Nursing | Scoop.it

Wearable Tech will help us live longer.

 

As visions of sugar plums recede to make room for New
Year’s resolutions, some consumers already have a jump
on health and wellness: Almost half (49%) own a wearable
device, according to PwC analysis. Of those, 45% own a
fitness band.


Beyond fitness, overall wellness is important to
consumers. They want wearables to help them:
• live longer
• reduce commute times
• maintain a healthy weight
• pay less in insurance premiums

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?&tag=wearables

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, September 26, 5:42 PM

Wearable Tech will help us live longer.

 

As visions of sugar plums recede to make room for New
Year’s resolutions, some consumers already have a jump
on health and wellness: Almost half (49%) own a wearable
device, according to PwC analysis. Of those, 45% own a
fitness band.


Beyond fitness, overall wellness is important to
consumers. They want wearables to help them:
• live longer
• reduce commute times
• maintain a healthy weight
• pay less in insurance premiums

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?&tag=wearables

 

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Perhaps only the arrival of digital natives can change healthcare

Perhaps only the arrival of digital natives can change healthcare | Perspectives on Health & Nursing | Scoop.it
Whatever our individual perceptions of life in the future, every part of it is likely to be aided, facilitated, moderated and serviced by a form of artificial intelligence (AI). Voice activation is a good example. Shopping and entertainment are now more convenient for hundreds of thousands of consumers, thanks to Alexa and Co.

Today’s young people, meanwhile, are digital natives: they have no notion of a time before mobile phones, will never have seen a cassette tape, and soon may not even need to pass a driving test to get behind the wheel of a vehicle. Any question about them not fully embracing intelligent technology is a moot one. Of course they will: they already are. They both accept and expect it.

If voice activation is developing, then so is the infrastructure to support it. Its integral place at the heart of our lives means that the system knows when we get up, leave the house, which route gets us to work, and who we know on a business or personal level. The services suggested to us will come automatically, and we will simply choose to opt in or out.

The point is, technology is already changing our ways of life. The only thing we can be sure of is that this change is ongoing. In May, for instance, the prime minister announced that she wants AI to be a “new weapon” to transform the way diseases like cancer, diabetes, heart disease and dementia are diagnosed by 2030.

Biased and limited by experience

When we experience ill health, we generally see either a specialist or generalist healthcare professional. Most will have trained for many years. But however many conferences they attend, books they read, journal papers they write, and patients they treat, their experience, intuition and perceptions are biased by context. And limited by it too.

Logically, a machine that sees patients can store clinical knowledge, assimilate patterns of behaviour, confer with other machines, and draw from a far broader range of data than any individual doctor. Presenting symptomatic data to a machine – that also analyses vital measurements and can refer to a global network of previous experience – must give it a better chance of arriving at an accurate diagnosis than a human.

And if it were possible for someone to be diagnosed with a condition without reference to a formal medical facility, then why not use machines to prescribe treatment regimens as well? Can a strictly-monitored, highly-regulated and financially punitive system survive when patients find a new way of interacting with the market?


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A lack of sleep is slowly killing you

A lack of sleep is slowly killing you | Perspectives on Health & Nursing | Scoop.it
AUSTRALIANS aren’t getting nearly enough sleep each night — and it’s slowly killing us.

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The top 5 startups disrupting healthcare within AI, digital therapeutics, health insurance, and genomics

The top 5 startups disrupting healthcare within AI, digital therapeutics, health insurance, and genomics | Perspectives on Health & Nursing | Scoop.it
The healthcare industry is facing disruption due to accelerating technological innovation and growing demand for improved delivery of healthcare and lower costs. Tech startups are leading the way by seizing opportunities in the areas of the industry that are most vulnerable to disruption, including genomics, pharmaceuticals, administration, clinical operations, and insurance.

Venture funds and businesses are taking notice of these startups' potential. In the US, digital health funding reached $1.6 billion in Q1 2018, according to Rock Health — the largest first quarter on record, surpassing the $1.4 billion in venture funding seen in Q1 2016. These high-potential startups provide a glimpse into the future of the healthcare space and demonstrate how we'll get there.

In this report, a compilation of various notes, Business Insider Intelligence will look at the top startups disrupting US healthcare in four key areas: artificial intelligence (AI), digital therapeutics, health insurance, and genomics. Startups in this report were selected based on the funding they've received over the past year, notable investors, the products they offer, and leadership in their functional area.

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New 'e-dermis' brings sense of touch, pain to prosthetic hands

New 'e-dermis' brings sense of touch, pain to prosthetic hands | Perspectives on Health & Nursing | Scoop.it
Amputees often experience the sensation of a "phantom limb"—a feeling that a missing body part is still there.

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Amir Najam Sethit's comment, June 22, 7:31 AM
what a technology!
Grengar Pitter's comment, June 22, 9:53 AM
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Richard Platt's curator insight, June 23, 7:39 PM

Amputees often experience the sensation of a "phantom limb"—a feeling that a missing body part is still there.  That sensory illusion is closer to becoming a reality thanks to a team of engineers at the Johns Hopkins University that has created an electronic skin. When layered on top of prosthetic hands, this e-dermis brings back a real sense of touch through the fingertips.  "After many years, I felt my hand, as if a hollow shell got filled with life again," says the anonymous amputee who served as the team's principal volunteer tester.  Made of fabric and rubber laced with sensors to mimic nerve endings, e-dermis recreates a sense of touch as well as pain by sensing stimuli and relaying the impulses back to the peripheral nerves.  "We've made a sensor that goes over the fingertips of a prosthetic hand and acts like your own skin would," says Luke Osborn, a graduate student in biomedical engineering. "It's inspired by what is happening in human biology, with receptors for both touch and pain.  "This is interesting and new," Osborn said, "because now we can have a prosthetic hand that is already on the market and fit it with an e-dermis that can tell the wearer whether he or she is picking up something that is round or whether it has sharp points."

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Future of Cardiology Will Be Defined by Digital, Mobile Advances

Future of Cardiology Will Be Defined by Digital, Mobile Advances | Perspectives on Health & Nursing | Scoop.it
Three JACC articles examine how new technology will change the prevention and treatment of heart disease

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Art Jones's curator insight, June 6, 3:22 PM

Excerpt: The future of cardiovascular care will be transformed by advances in artificial intelligence, digital health technology and mobile devices as a means to prevent and treat heart disease

Richard Platt's curator insight, June 8, 10:56 PM

The Use of Artificial Intelligence in Cardiology:  As the type and breadth of data available to cardiologists and the cardiovascular care team continues to grow more sophisticated, physicians are increasingly being asked to provide more rapid and personalized interpretations of data to their patients. One solution to providing this level of personalized medicine efficiently is artificial intelligence, also known as machine learning. researchers analyze select applications of artificial intelligence in cardiology and identify how the specialty could incorporate more artificial intelligence in the future to enhance the capabilities and experiences of clinicians and patients.  “(Artificial intelligence) has clear potential to enhance every stage of patient care — from research and discovery, to diagnosis, to selection of therapy,” said Joel Dudley, Ph.D., senior author of the review and director of the Next Generation Healthcare Institute at Mount Sinai. “A key next step to incorporating artificial intelligence into cardiology is to align available data and technologies with clinical and business use. This way, we can prioritize short-term opportunities and understand gaps in available data or algorithms that are holding back applications of artificial intelligence in areas of high clinical need.”  According to the review, artificial intelligence is currently only performed by those with specialized training, but in the future, these methods will be increasingly easy and widely available. It may eventually be incorporated into day-to-day practice by interacting with electronic health records and billing.

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Your Lifestyle Has a Greater Impact on Your Health Than You Might Realize | Thrive Global

Your Lifestyle Has a Greater Impact on Your Health Than You Might Realize | Thrive Global | Perspectives on Health & Nursing | Scoop.it
These choices are especially important when it comes to preventing cancer.

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Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, May 3, 9:57 AM

There is more than just eating healthy or exercise and fitness. This article points out a more comprehensive look at how to avoid #cancer

Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, May 3, 10:05 AM

LIfestyle is essential when trying to stay on top and keep that competitive edge. Avoiding #cancer by lifestyle...

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Analysis: Why scientists think 100% of global warming is due to humans

Analysis: Why scientists think 100% of global warming is due to humans | Perspectives on Health & Nursing | Scoop.it

In its 2013 fifth assessment report, the IPCC stated in its summary for policymakers that it is “extremely likely that more than half of the observed increase in global average surface temperature” from 1951 to 2010 was caused by human activity. By “extremely likely”, it meant that there was between a 95% and 100% probability that more than half of modern warming was due to humans.

 

This somewhat convoluted statement has been often misinterpreted as implying that the human responsibility for modern warming lies somewhere between 50% and 100%. In fact, as NASA’s Dr Gavin Schmidt has pointed out, the IPCC’s implied best guess was that humans were responsible for around 110% of observed warming (ranging from 72% to 146%), with natural factors in isolation leading to a slight cooling over the past 50 years.

 

Similarly, the recent US fourth national climate assessment found that between 93% to 123% of observed 1951-2010 warming was due to human activities.

 

These conclusions have led to some confusion as to how more than 100% of observed warming could be attributable to human activity. A human contribution of greater than 100% is possible because natural climate change associated with volcanoes and solar activity would most likely have resulted in a slight cooling over the past 50 years, offsetting some of the warming associated with human activities.


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Saberes Sin Fronteras OVS's curator insight, April 25, 4:28 PM

Como formuló Macron en su visita a Washington, NO HAY un segundo planeta tierra (al menos en bastantes años) 

Carlos Garcia Pando's comment, April 26, 6:20 AM
Yes, Nature's trend was cooling. Also, a stable system reacts with a behaviour to oppose the cause of instability, that is, cooling. But still, we are making sure we heat up the oven to burn ourselves sooner than expected.
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Structure of the herpes simplex virus 1 and 2, viruses that cause cold sores and genital herpes

Structure of the herpes simplex virus 1 and 2, viruses that cause cold sores and genital herpes | Perspectives on Health & Nursing | Scoop.it

The herpesvirus family includes herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), which causes cold sores, and type 2 (HSV-2), which causes genital herpes. Herpesviruses comprise a large DNA genome enclosed in a large and complex protein cage called a capsid (see the Perspective by Heldwein).

 

Scientists now used electron microscopy to determine a high-resolution structure of the HSV-1 capsid bound to the tegument proteins that occupy the space between the capsid and the nuclear envelope. The structure suggests how these components may play a role in viral transport. Another team of researchers describes a higher-resolution structure of an HSV-2 capsid, providing insight into how the shell assembles and is stabilized.

 

Since Hippocrates first described the cutaneous spreading of herpes simplex lesions, many other diseases—chickenpox, infectious mononucleosis, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and Kaposi’s sarcoma—have been found to be associated with the nine known human herpesviruses. Among them, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1, causes cold sores), type 2 (HSV-2, causes genital herpes), and varicella-zoster virus (causes chickenpox and shingles)—which all belong to the α-herpesvirus subfamily—can establish lifelong latent infection within our peripheral nervous system.

 

A prominent feature of these neurotropic viruses is the long-range (up to tens of centimeters) axonal retrograde transport of the DNA-containing viral capsid from nerve endings at sites of infection (such as the lips) to neuronal cell bodies at the ganglia to establish latency or, upon reactivation, anterograde transport of the progeny viral particles from the ganglia to nerve terminals, resulting in reinfection of the dermis. Capsid-associated tegument complexes (CATCs) have been demonstrated to be involved in this cytoskeleton-dependent capsid transport. Because of the large size (~1300 Å) of HSV-1 particles, it has been difficult to obtain atomic structures of the HSV-1 capsid and CATC; consequently, the structural bases underlying α-herpesviruses’ remarkable capability of long-range neuronal transport and many other aspects of its life cycle are poorly understood.


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Where is biotech and big pharma on social media?

Where is biotech and big pharma on social media? | Perspectives on Health & Nursing | Scoop.it

“The absence of pharma brands on social media creates a significant void of reputable healthcare information to aid patients.” posits Dawn Lacallade, LiveWorld. Why isn’t the pharmaceutical industry more active on social media? They would say advertising restrictions and other FDA regulations severely limit their ability to have a social media presence. There is a fear of discussing prescription medication in the uncontrolled environment of the internet. But the industry is missing a terrific opportunity to impact their entire constituency: patients, caregivers, employees, scientists and even their reputation.

Unmetric, a branded content analytics company, recently released a report that outlined social media trends for big pharma. They cited four silos where pharmaceutical companies are utilizing social media. All companies studied have excellent corporate social profiles. They are attractive and informative in a general way about the company, but they aren’t interactive. Most of the pharmaceutical companies have a career silo. It is interesting that the pharmaceutical industry has lagged other industries in setting up and managing an effective career site. No real clarity on why this has happened. There is little to no FDA regulation on advertising open positions.

About half of the pharmaceutical companies in Unmetric’s study have invested money and content into OTC brand profiles. Again these tend to be static/informative and not interactive. The biggest opportunity for big pharma is in the last silo defined by Unmetric, branded community properties. Patient’s have been and continue to turn to social media to research and understand their symptoms and diagnoses as well as trying to connect with other patients.


 

Under current FDA regulations it is hard for the pharma company to easily join the conversation to provide accurate, balanced info because regulations mandate that “within a single social post brands must provide accurate details on the benefits and risks associated with conditions and products.” Character limits and the speed with which interactions occur means a different approach is necessary. Pharma companies must talk about the disease rather than the product or drug itself. They must try to create a place where people gather who are concerned about one of these conditions. Trying to figure out what drives engagement and putting more effort and money into it will pay off for big pharma.

Social listening is another tool that biotech and big pharma under utilize. Gauging community sentiment about marketed drugs, learning about competitors and gaining insights to improve products, services and treatments are all achievable through social media research. Social media should be more of a pull than a push of information when done correctly. Kiran Mazumdar-Sahw, Chair and Managing Director of Biocon Limited, says, “Doctors clearly will drive this change, as will younger patients. The mindset today is still controlled by pre-internet key opinion leader doctors and older patients who are not tech savvy. As younger and tech-savvy doctors and patients populate our health care ecosystem, things will change and this change will occur rapidly after a certain inflection point which is not more than 3-5 years away. There will be an explosion of social media and mobile-based apps.” For the savvy biotech or pharmaceutical company it’s time to start investing in social media.


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Meet the 'backpack midwife' bringing #healthcare for all #Africa #Development 

Meet the 'backpack midwife' bringing #healthcare for all #Africa #Development  | Perspectives on Health & Nursing | Scoop.it
For many people in remote regions access to healthcare is limited, so tech is coming to their aid.

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Igor Espanhol's curator insight, February 12, 6:18 PM

"Margaret works out of the Kiambu Community Life Centre north of Nairobi, where voluntary health workers are the first point of contact for those seeking medical help."

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Kantar - These are the doctors tapping into social media

Kantar - These are the doctors tapping into social media | Perspectives on Health & Nursing | Scoop.it

Advances in technology have changed healthcare practices and how doctors interact online. The widespread adoption of social networks is making a bigger impact on a physician’s day-to-day life, especially when consumers go online to look for health information and health providers.

Kantar Media's Healthcare Research Client Services division has gotten a clearer picture of how doctors are engaging with social media to interact with their peers and their patients. We also discovered which doctors are utilizing social media the most.

Importance of Social Media

Patients desire ways to connect with each other and healthcare professionals via social media. Therefore, it's crucial that doctors evolve their practices to meet this demand:

Nearly 3 out of 4 US adults indicate they typically go online for health and wellness purposes.32% conduct research online prior to a doctor’s appointment. 36% research treatment options on their own and then ask their doctor about them.53% value social content/sharing websites as a source for health information (e.g., social networking sites, references websites with user-generated content, drug review/ratings websites, online blogs or online communities/support groups)69% of all adults indicate they have caught up or posted on a social network from a computer or mobile device within the last monthSource: Kantar Media’s 2017 MARS Consumer Health Study

How Doctors Interact with Patients and Peers

According to Kantar Media’s 2017 Medical Surgical Sources and Interactions study, healthcare professionals are finding effective ways to utilize social media. For example, nearly half of all physicians surveyed (47%) say they have posted, followed or communicated with colleagues on professional social networks in the past 30 days via a computer or mobile device.


When communicating with healthcare consumers, nearly half of all doctors surveyed indicate they use a patient portal to interact with patients. Additionally, 7% say they use social media to communicate with specific patients or to promote their practice with a broad group of patients (an increase of one percentage point since last year). 

Which Doctors Value Social Media

18% of all doctors say they value Social Communities/Networks as a source of professional information. Of these:

43% are age <45 (132 index compared to total doctors surveyed)39% are female (135 index compared to total doctors surveyed)46% see over 100 patients in an average week
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This 'breakthrough' protein glue could save lives in emergencies

This 'breakthrough' protein glue could save lives in emergencies | Perspectives on Health & Nursing | Scoop.it

Australian and American biomedical engineers have developed a stretchy surgical glue that rapidly heals wounds, a "breakthrough" that has the potential to save lives in emergencies, its designers say.

 

The injectable glue, MeTro, is based on a naturally occurring protein called tropaelastin. It is applied directly to the wound and is then activated with UV light to form a complete seal, eliminating the need for staples or stitches. Its elasticity means it's designed to work well on shape-changing internal organs like the lungs and heart.

 

A study published in journal Science Translational Medicine showed the glue quickly and successfully sealed incisions in the arteries and lungs of rodents and the lungs of pigs.


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K.I.R.M. God is Business " From Day One"'s curator insight, October 6, 2017 3:19 PM

An emergency fix that really stick to yah!/What's gluing in health tody? 

Victor Jimenez's curator insight, October 7, 2017 4:37 PM
Share your insight
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New Sensor Lets You Monitor Blood Pressure With Your Smartphone

New Sensor Lets You Monitor Blood Pressure With Your Smartphone | Perspectives on Health & Nursing | Scoop.it
Researchers have created a new sensor that works with a smartphone app to helps patients monitor their blood pressure anytime, anywhere.

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Why Amazon has a big data analytics edge in primary care clinics

Why Amazon has a big data analytics edge in primary care clinics | Perspectives on Health & Nursing | Scoop.it
The retail giant has a proven track record of using business intelligence more effectively than just about anyone else to cut costs and improve consumer satisfaction.

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Florian Morandeau's curator insight, August 22, 1:03 AM

Using big data, analytics and business intelligence to drive down costs in primary care.

Richard Platt's curator insight, August 28, 1:59 PM

The latest twist in Amazon’s road into healthcare emerged with reports speculating that the company is building primary care clinics for its employees. And while Seattle-area medical groups and hospitals are likely wondering what that might mean for their patient populations the initiative, should it happen, could have implications beyond the Pacific Northwest in short order.

As costs continue to rise and quality stagnates, employers footing the hefty bill for their employees health benefits are looking for ways to make sure managing employee health doesn’t kill their business.  That is exactly where Amazon has an edge: Using big data, analytics and business intelligence to drive down costs while also ramping up consumer convenience and satisfaction.

Amazon not first with on-site clinics

Amazon is looking to put its stamp on healthcare in a number of ways. For instance, renowned cardiologist Maulik Majmudar revealed that he is leaving the Healthcare Transformation Lab to join Amazon, though in exactly what capacity is not yet known. In mid-August, the company joined forces with Google, IBM, Microsoft, Salesforce and Oracle in taking an interoperability pledge involving FHIR, HL7’s Argonaut and cloud computing.  

In late June, meanwhile, Amazon bought PillPack for its online virtual pharmacy. And in that same month the company, along with partners Berkshire Hathaway and JPMorgan Chase named Atul Gawande to head the startup they are building that remains something of a mystery in terms of its intentions other than to reduce costs and create better models of care.

Amazon would not be the sole intrepid company establishing its clinics for its employees. Boeing and Disney do it. John Deere, too. Most recently, Henry Ford Health System and automotive giant GM announced plans for direct employer-contracted healthcare.

Should the company create clinics, however, many people will be watching closely because of its unique potential to shake things up.  “Amazon has established itself right now as disruptor 2.0,” said Paul Keckley, president of the Keckley Group, a healthcare advisory firm. “It has a take-no-prisoners approach to taking costs out of the systems. In 1.0, there were a lot of innovators doing different things. What Amazon does is say ‘we’re going to take this to scale.’”  Keckley said depending on what survey you read, an employee clinic can save $2,000 a year per employee if it is well-utilized. Employers are already paying skyrocketing healthcare costs for other providers in their respective markets, so why not do something semi-radical and try and head some of that off at the pass by providing a healthcare solution in-house, increasing access to care and the likelihood an employee will use it to reduce more costly episodes of care.  Although Amazon’s plans are little more than speculation at this point, on-site clinics and arrangements like the one GM and Henry Ford Health just struck set the stage for employers to make more demands of healthcare delivery organizations for market-based solutions, according to Rita Numerof, healthcare industry expert and founder of Numerof and Associates.

Amazon should concern health systems

The entire industry needs to pay attention. For one thing, manufacturers of healthcare products and services should note that Amazon, or any company, bringing healthcare delivery in-house allows them to have more direct control providing that service and that’s an important factor across the board. It’s more than healthcare manufacturers selling to these retailers, it’s about how to deliver services differently and make sure services and products have demonstrated value.  “Business is not going to be as usual and that’s a good thing. There is no question that this is disruptive and Amazon is in position to leverage its size and capabilities in data in delivering services to consumers that matter,” Numerof said. “That is a statement about a nontraditional player that has been extraordinarily successful moving into healthcare. They wouldn’t be doing this if they didn’t think there was a business opportunity.”  Numerof also said health systems should be very concerned about this, and would do well to step back and really look at the hard question of ‘how well-prepared are we to demonstrate the value of the services we bring to employee groups,’ whether it’s primary care or managing care in different settings. She said if a CEO or board is honest, most will have to say they are not ready. That’s because 30 years of building and perfecting models that are site-based, highly transactional and focused on getting paid for a service, but not necessarily connecting that service to the outcomes that are important across that population, has not prepared them to compete in the market of tomorrow.  “The other side of that, though, is they don’t want to flip their own model without making sure the payment is going to follow a different delivery basis. Nobody ever got points for driving a business into a ditch,” Numerof added.  Still, it’s all about choice and providers should ask themselves why an Amazon employee would still go to their hospital-based provider for primary care when they charge more than the employee clinic and are less convenient. Numerof also said the fact that Amazon is keeping the whole enterprise in-house, doing its own hiring and not contracting the operation out to another healthcare organization, is telling.  Don’t be surprised if in a year Amazon has solidified its own operation such that it branches out and sets up shop for other employers.  The implementation of work-site clinics, by Amazon and the others, is a not a passing event. It’s another step in the direction of a move to market-based model. And one that makes great sense. Employers have not taken as important a role in demanding better outcomes and greater accountability, but they need to because they have a vested interest in it.

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Needle-Less Alternative to Stitches

Needle-Less Alternative to Stitches | Perspectives on Health & Nursing | Scoop.it
Needle-Less Alternative to Stitches
DermaClip is a needle-less alternative to conventional stitches or surgical staples. The adhesive clips are placed around a wound so doctors can pull it closed without any pain. They are most effective to use in emergency situations or by those without medical tr

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Shepherd Matsongoni's curator insight, July 19, 9:42 PM
Needle-less to say, this is a SHARP idea!
 
Grengar Pitter's comment, July 23, 12:08 PM
https://bit.ly/2t79MWx
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Gadget review: Fitbit Ace is a seriouis smartwatch for kids

Gadget review: Fitbit Ace is a seriouis smartwatch for kids | Perspectives on Health & Nursing | Scoop.it
We stapped Fitbit's new smartwatch for kids onto an eight-year-old. Here's what happened.

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K.I.R.M. God is Business " From Day One"'s curator insight, June 28, 2:23 AM

Is it the watch or the children that is smart. Knowing how to work electronic is not necessary smartness in some aspects of life. What if the bsttery died and the electronics are no accessible could the children still perform that which is needed. The electronic are doing the techniques not the children. 

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Google's Masterplan for Healthcare #hcsmeufr #esante #digitalhealth

Google's Masterplan for Healthcare #hcsmeufr #esante #digitalhealth | Perspectives on Health & Nursing | Scoop.it
The search engine’s parent company, Alphabet takes its move into medicine seriously. We looked at it thoroughly what Google in healthcare looks like.
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Richard Platt's curator insight, June 19, 11:51 AM
The Alphabet of investment

Larry Page says on the opening page of Alphabet that they do not intend to become a conventional company. When you look at their actions in healthcare, that’s definitely true. No other company in the Silicon Valley is investing so heavily in healthcare-related companies as Alphabet’s venture arm, GV (formerly known as Google Ventures) does.

Since it raised its first fund in 2009, it has backed nearly 60 health-related enterprises. Their portfolio is very diverse ranging from genetics to telemedicine. GV invested in 23andme, the most well-known direct-to-consumer genetic testing company with one of the biggest DNA databases in the world. In addition, Google has stakes in Oscar Health, the New York-based venture disrupting health insurance; Doctor on Demand, a telehealth company helping people talking to physicians from afar; Flatiron Health, a company building a data platform dedicated to oncology or Impossible Foods developing plant-based meats and cheeses.

Moreover, CNBC says that five of GV’s healthcare bets have gone public in the last year, and 23andme plans to do that before the end of the year. It seems like a lot of well-placed investment money for Alphabet. However, that’s only one side of the story.

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Fitbit and Google Team Up on Digital Health Initiative

Fitbit and Google Team Up on Digital Health Initiative | Perspectives on Health & Nursing | Scoop.it

The partnership between Fitbit and Google has the potential to revolutionize digital healthcare by enabling patients to link personal data with medical records.


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Super-resolution high-speed 4D microscopy captures images in both space and time

Super-resolution high-speed 4D microscopy captures images in both space and time | Perspectives on Health & Nursing | Scoop.it

Fast live-cell 3D phase imaging of cellular dynamics. (Left) Human fibroblast migrating on a glass substrate, showing first frame of a 25-second movie imaged.

 

Scientists at the Laboratory of Biomedical Optics (LOB) at EPFL (École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne) in Switzerland have developed the first microscope platform that can perform “super-resolution” imaging in both space and time — capturing unprecedented “4D” views inside living cells. The landmark paper is published in Nature Photonics and on open-access ArXiv.

 

Super-resolution microscopy is a technique (covered extensively on KurzweilAI) that can “see” beyond Abbe’s diffraction-of-light limit, providing unprecedented views of cells and their interior structures and organelles. The developers won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2014.

 

But super-resolution microscopy only offers improved spatial resolution. That might suffice for static samples, like solid materials or fixed cells, but living cells are highly dynamic and depend on a complex set of constantly changing biological processes that occur across sub-second timescales. So to visualize and understand how living cells function in health and disease, high “temporal” (time) resolution is also required.

 

Enter the 4D microscope. A team led by Professor Theo Lasser, head of the LOB, has developed a “4D microscope” that they dubbed PRISM (Phase Retrieval Instrument with Super-resolution Microscopy). A simple add-on to existing widefield microscopes, it combines 3D super-resolution microscopy (for high spatial resolution) with fast 3D phase (time) imaging in a single instrument. Phase imaging translates phase changes (changes over time) of light — caused by changes in cells and their organelles — into conventional spatial maps of the cells.


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(Empathic Healthcare) A dose of empathy may support patients in pain

(Empathic Healthcare) A dose of empathy may support patients in pain | Perspectives on Health & Nursing | Scoop.it
The study, which combined data from 28 clinical trials involving over 6,000 patients, adds weight to the argument that patient outcomes can be improved when doctors enhance how they express empathy and create positive expectations of benefit.

From the Universities of Oxford and Southampton in the UK, with the Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research and Lithuania's Vilnius Gediminas Technical University, the research team analysed a series of randomised clinical trials that looked at the effects of empathy or positive communication in healthcare consultations. These trials included data from consultations on a wide range of clinical conditions including pain, asthma, irritable bowel syndrome, osteoarthritis and recovery after surgery. The researchers also reviewed the effects of positive communication on quality-of-life and patient satisfaction, based on reports from patients in these trials.

 

Jeremy Howick

 

Jeremy Howick et al. Effects of empathic and positive communication in healthcare consultations: a systematic review and meta-analysis, Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine (2018). DOI: 10.1177/0141076818769477 


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Explaining the Basics of the Internet of Things for Healthcare

Explaining the Basics of the Internet of Things for Healthcare | Perspectives on Health & Nursing | Scoop.it
Wearables and other smart devices are taking over the consumer space, but what does the Internet of Things mean for the healthcare industry?
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Silicon Valley and Digital Therapeutics Vow to Go Beyond the Pill. But Is It Worth the Price?

Silicon Valley and Digital Therapeutics Vow to Go Beyond the Pill. But Is It Worth the Price? | Perspectives on Health & Nursing | Scoop.it

What if an app could replace a pill? That’s the big question behind an emerging trend known as “digital therapeutics.” The idea: software that can improve a person’s health as much as a drug can, but without the same cost and side-effects.

 

Digital therapeutics, or “digiceuticals,” as some call them, have become a Holy Grail in some quarters of Silicon Valley, where investors see the chance to deliver medicine through your smartphone. Andreessen Horowitz, the venture firm, even predicts digital drugs will become “the third phase” of medicine, meaning the successor to the chemical and protein drugs we have now, but without the billion-dollar cost of bringing one to market.

 

About a dozen startups now call themselves digital therapeutics providers, and say they’re distinct from the rest of the digital health market of activity monitors, smart scales, and sleep trackers.

 

To distinguish themselves from “wellness” gadgets, digital therapeutics companies tend to carry out clinical tests and sometimes seek regulatory approvals –one company, Welldoc, offers a prescription-only version of its BlueStar phone app for managing diabetes, which it terms the “first FDA-cleared mobile prescription therapy.” But unlike drugs, digital therapeutics don’t usually need approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, since often they promote lifestyle or dietary changes that are deemed to be low-risk.

 

Whether a digital therapeutic involves a tracking sensor or coaching though an app, the biggest question is whether they provide a distinct, measureable medical benefit. One startup calling itself a digital therapeutics company is Virta Health, based in San Francisco. The company raised $37 million in March. Its goal is to actually “reverse” diabetes without drugs or surgery using online coaching to get people on a special diet high in fats and low on carbs. It has a study by Indiana State University to back up the claim—about half of the 262 people with type 2 diabetes enrolled in a 10-week trial were able to reduce their blood glucose levels to non-diabetic ranges.

 

Some digital companies are already allying with pharmaceutical makers. One, Propeller Health, inked a deal with GlaxoSmithKline for what it calls a “digitally guided therapy” platform (read “GSK #pharma Propels Ahead by Targeting COPD Adherence with IoT Inhaler”; http://sco.lt/8vnt8z). The approach combines Glaxo’s asthma medications with sensors, made by Propeller, that patients attach to their inhalers to monitor when they’re used. Patients who get feedback from Propeller’s app end up using the medication less often.

 

Some drug company executives remain skeptical. Robert Plenge, vice president at Merck’s research labs, had to look up “digital therapeutics” when asked whether they were important. “I don’t totally understand what you mean,” he says. “Which might in and of itself be your answer.” Plenge doesn’t think the idea would have much impact on drug development and questioned whether digital companies will be able to prove their offerings are worth the price.

 

Further Reading:

“Will Silicon Valley Startups & Empowered Patients Replace #BigPharma?”; http://sco.lt/9FmPDN“AMA CEO Calls Out Medical Apps as ‘Digital Snake Oil’"; http://sco.lt/8zuIld“Silicon Valley & Pharma
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Utsav Rawat's curator insight, April 10, 2017 11:37 AM
Innovation in healthcare
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In just two hours, Amazon erased $30 billion in market value for healthcare’s biggest companies

In just two hours, Amazon erased $30 billion in market value for healthcare’s biggest companies | Perspectives on Health & Nursing | Scoop.it
Amazon has disrupted fashion, books, furniture, food, cloud-based storage services, and much else besides. Now, it's coming for one of the biggest, most complex industries in the US: healthcare. Today (Jan. 30), Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway, and JPMorgan announced a vague but market-moving plan to launch an independent company that will offer healthcare services t

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Art Jones's curator insight, January 31, 12:13 PM

Amazon is a dominate force in every consumer facing industry. The next industry Amazon's looking to disrupt is Healthcare.

 

Excerpt:

Amazon has disrupted fashion, books, furniture, food, cloud-based storage services, and much else besides. Now, it’s coming for one of the biggest, most complex industries in the US: healthcare.

 

Today (Jan. 30), Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway, and JPMorgan announced a vague but market-moving plan to launch an independent company that will offer healthcare services to the companies’ employees at a lower cost. The venture, which will be managed by executives from the firms, will be run more like a non-profit, than a for-profit entity.

 

The market value of 10 large, listed health insurance and pharmacy stocks 1 dropped by a combined $30 billion in the first two hours of trading. At the time of writing, insurer MetLife was the hardest hit, down nearly 9% for the day.

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Wearable Tech Emerging For Chronic Pain Relief

Wearable Tech Emerging For Chronic Pain Relief | Perspectives on Health & Nursing | Scoop.it
Some think that wearables are a pain, like Alan Tyers who wrote "why I hate wearable technology" for The Telegraph. But how about wearables that can actually relieve pain?
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