Pedagogical Ponderings
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Pedagogical Ponderings
Encouraging teachers to think about effective teaching, strategies, programmes, assessment and reporting that will instill key C21 competences and maximise the potential of e-Learning.
Curated by Charles Newton
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Howard Gardner, creator of ‘multiple intelligences’ theory, launches new project on ‘good’ education

Howard Gardner, creator of ‘multiple intelligences’ theory, launches new project on ‘good’ education | Pedagogical Ponderings | Scoop.it
Armed with a set of criteria drawn from different disciplines, I identified seven separate intelligences. All human beings possess these seven intelligences, but we differ from one another in which are strong; and in any case, strength or weakness in one (say spatial intelligence) does not predict strength or weakness in another (say, interpersonal or musical intelligence).

 

I would now add a few more intelligences to the list, and others, most famously Daniel Goleman, have proposed yet other intelligences like emotional intelligence. I am no longer invested in my particular set of intelligences. For me, the important advance is that a multiplicity of intelligences has been acknowledged—wits, rather than wit.

 

In this era of succinct messaging, I’ve created a twitter-short formula: Multiple Wits and Good Grits Lead to a Success Beyond Selfies.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Howard-GARDNER


 


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Antonio Gerardo Gutiérrez Sánchez's curator insight, October 4, 2014 10:31 PM

agregar su visión ...

Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, October 5, 2014 10:07 AM

adicionar a sua visão ...

Laura Saavedra's curator insight, October 8, 2014 5:26 PM

So what is your mind like?

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For Teenage Brains, the Importance of Continuing to Learn Deeply

For Teenage Brains, the Importance of Continuing to Learn Deeply | Pedagogical Ponderings | Scoop.it
It used to be that neuroscientists thought smart people were all alike. But now they think that some very smart people retain the ability to learn rapidly, like a child, well into adolescence.

 

“Until adolescence there are lots of new connections being made between neurons to store patterns and information collected from the environment,” Brant says.

 

The brain adds many synapses in the cortex. This comes at a time when the brain is especially responsive to learning. This is typically followed by cortical pruning in adolescence, as the brain shifts from hyperlearning mode.

Hewitt agrees: “The developing brain is a much more flexible organ than the mature brain.”

 

Learning doesn’t stop at adolescence, of course, but the “sensitive period” — where the brain is hyperlearning mode — does appear to come to an end. Learning new things gets harder.

 


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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's comment, September 24, 2013 11:44 AM
Thanks Linda. I appreciate the reference to the NPR discussion.
Aramis's curator insight, September 25, 2013 1:56 AM

brilliant

Sharla Shults's curator insight, October 2, 2013 5:40 PM

For some reason, as kids get older, they no longer 'think that thinking' is important! They don't want to think; instead, they simply just want the answer.

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Learning To Learn: 7 Dimensions Of Effective Learning

Learning To Learn: 7 Dimensions Of Effective Learning | Pedagogical Ponderings | Scoop.it
Learning To Learn: 7 Dimensions Of Effective Learning from TeachThought

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Gust MEES's curator insight, April 13, 2013 7:13 PM

 

I love it...

 

Check ALSO:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching?tag=L2L

 

 

Allan Shaw's curator insight, April 14, 2013 6:55 PM

"The shift is from learning content to learning how to learn.

The takeaways for teachers probably start with the role of the student in the learning process: voice, choice, personalization, self-direction, project-based learning, and other low-hanging fruit of current trends in learning.

Bigger picture, the conclusions are probably more directed with educational structures, the form of curriculum, and school design."

The micro needs to be worked on in school. The macro needs to be addressed by school and system leaders. Thanks Gust!

Stephen Gwilliam's curator insight, April 16, 2013 10:23 PM

Could you add any more dimensions to this list? How about applying a Field Force Tool at a staff meeting?

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The Maker Movement and the Rebirth of Constructionism - Hybrid Pedagogy

The Maker Movement and the Rebirth of Constructionism - Hybrid Pedagogy | Pedagogical Ponderings | Scoop.it
The culmination of my quest for more powerful learning grounded in theory and research came when recently I conducted an experiment in pushing constructionism into the digital age.

 

Constructionism is based on two types of construction. First, it asserts that learning is an active process, in which people actively construct knowledge from their experience in the world. People don’t get ideas; they make them. This aspect of construction comes from the constructivist theory of knowledge development by Jean Piaget. To Piaget’s concept, Papert added another type of construction, arguing that people construct new knowledge with particular effectiveness when they are engaged in constructing personally meaningful products.

Imagine my surprise and joy when I realized that I had arrived at constructionism prior to knowing that such a theory even existed. I believe that thousands of other educators are unknowingly working within the constructionist paradigm as well. Although many within the Maker movement are aware that it has it’s roots in constructionism, the movement is gaining impressive momentum without the majority of Makers realizing that there is a strong theoretical foundation behind their work.

 

After I came to understand this connection between my practices and the supporting theoretical framework I was better able to focus and refine my practice. Even more importantly, I felt more confident and powerful in forging ahead with further experiments in the learning situations I design for my learners.

 


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Leah Lesley Christensen's curator insight, February 28, 2014 2:20 AM

Yes, I agree !

ManufacturingStories's curator insight, February 28, 2015 4:54 PM

Includes a great podcast

Pamela D Lloyd's curator insight, February 28, 2015 6:58 PM

We learn by doing, so teaching should ask us to do.

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Survey: Learning '21st-Century Skills' Linked to Work Success

Survey: Learning '21st-Century Skills' Linked to Work Success | Pedagogical Ponderings | Scoop.it
Students' exposure to so-called 21st-century skills in school correlates positively with perceived quality of work later in life, according to a new study by Gallup Inc

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Gust MEES's curator insight, May 31, 2013 5:37 PM

 

         ===> PracTICE matters, prepare the learners for the "Real-World"! <===