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Rescooped by Thomas Blunden from Physical Activity - What is it good for?
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The FITT Principle of Training

The FITT Principle of Training | PDHPE | Scoop.it
“ What is the FITT principle and how can you make best use of it to improve your level of fitness?”
Via Rosehill College Physical Education 13PED
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We are looking at the FITT principle in PDHPE at school
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WHO | Physical Activity and Young People

WHO | Physical Activity and Young People | PDHPE | Scoop.it
“ Recommended levels of physical activity for young people.”
Via Naomi Barrett
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We are researching about sport for young people in our sport class at school
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Rescooped by Thomas Blunden from investigation
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WHO | Physical Activity and Young People

WHO | Physical Activity and Young People | PDHPE | Scoop.it
“ Recommended levels of physical activity for young people.”
Via Naomi Barrett
Thomas Blunden's insight:
We are researching about sport for young people in sport at school
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Rescooped by Thomas Blunden from Of human kindness
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WHO definition of health remains fit for purpose -- Lewis 343 -- bmj.com

WHO definition of health remains fit for purpose -- Lewis 343 -- bmj.com | PDHPE | Scoop.it
Copy of my letter in this week's BMJ I was surprised by Huber and colleagues’ arguments for denouncing the World Health Organization’s definition of health, which has stood for more than 60 years.1 It made me wonder why anyone would question this definition, especially with so many people living with chronic disease. It struck me that the authors wished to diminish the suffering that is associated with many chronic conditions because the patient may on the surface be functioning well. Someone is healthy or not, in my opinion. There is no shame in having a chronic condition, and society should not turn its gaze from the truth—that many people are not well. Many people have chronic conditions. Many people suffer, often behind closed doors. In my experience, most people with chronic conditions aspire to physical, mental, and social wellbeing. Most of them acknowledge that they may never again attain such a state of health. Acceptance of this fact is part of the process of moving on with their lives. However, they will never be healthy. It is wrong to dismiss ill health in the way Huber and colleagues propose because people with ill health deserve our support, if not sympathy. We are all vulnerable. There is no shame in being unwell or unhealthy, and this article does nothing to increase understanding of what it is like to live with a chronic condition. The 1948 WHO definition of health is therefore as valid today as it was when it was published: “Health is a state of complete physical, mental, and social wellbeing and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.”
Via David Lewis
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We are looking at this in class, trying to find the definition of health.
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