Nicholas' Year 9 Journal
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Safer Sydney: Alcohol link to young criminals

Safer Sydney: Alcohol link to young criminals | Nicholas' Year 9 Journal | Scoop.it
About 70 per cent of young people in custody in NSW were drunk when they committed their crime, juvenile justice officials say, adding weight to calls for tougher government action to tackle booze-fuelled harm.
Nicholas Kyriakoudes's insight:

I believe that this article shows alot about how alcohol can affect young people and their actions. I believe stricter laws should be introduced to lower the use of underage drinkers and also how many people break the law because alcohol. This is a disgusting part of Australian culture, its Bogan to drink because its ''cool''. Education, education, education. Education is key if our Country is to break this mentality that drinking till you get drunk is ''cool''. 

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How to educate your teen about sex

How to educate your teen about sex | Nicholas' Year 9 Journal | Scoop.it

It’s an issue that traditionally makes both teenagers and their parents squirm in their seats: sex.

Surging rates of sexually transmissible infections [STIs] among young Australians can no longer be ignored. Especially in light of the fact that a recent survey found that the majority of young people in years 10 and 12 are sexually active, and this has increased over the last decade.

Chlamydia is the nation's most common communicable disease with a record high of more than 58,400 cases registered last year, and 16 to 25-year-olds are worst affected. The real tally is likely to be much higher as many sufferers don't get diagnosed or treated.

Beyond any short-term discomfort and embarrassment, this virulent disease has the potential to cause far-reaching health problems down the track, such as infertility.

Building awareness

Yet research shows most young people have very little knowledge about common STIs, including chlamydia, herpes, gonorrhoea and genital warts. Nor do they feel comfortable going to their doctor for testing or treatment.

This doesn't, however, stop them from indulging in unprotected sex. Almost one in three Australian teens has sexual intercourse without a condom by the time they reach Year 12, according to the Secondary Students and Sexual Health survey. More than half also give or receive oral sex, which most do not equate with "real sex". However, it's an activity that can leave them with a nasty infection.

Professor Marian Pitts, director of the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society at La Trobe University in Melbourne, which carries out the survey, believes more education and public awareness about STIs is needed.

"There's actually no evidence, certainly in Australia, as to what's being delivered as sex education in schools," she says. "So I don't think we can be confident that every student has access to good quality sex education. And young people leave school somewhere between the ages of 16 and 18 but certainly their sex lives don't stop there, so we also need broader education outside of schools."

Professor Pitts suspects the lack of public awareness campaigns may be due to the fact it's not "a sexy subject". "People don't want to read in broad detail about STIs," she says. But the price of ignoring them can be high. It may be more than a decade before the current generation discovers the damage silently wreaked on their health by STIs, usually when they want to start a family of their own.

This can include ectopic pregnancies, pelvic inflammatory disease and fertility problems in both men and women. Some experts predict a rise in demand for assisted fertility treatments because of complications related to untreated infections. Worryingly, many teens infected with STIs get no symptoms or only fleeting irritations, making them less likely to be diagnosed and treated.

Dr Chris Bourne, head of NSW Health's STI programs unit, says young people should be encouraged to get regularly tested and use condoms. "Even if you develop symptoms and they go away, you could still be infected," he says. "It doesn't mean you are cured." Dr Bourne says most teens are responsible about using condoms at their first sexual encounter, but tend to discard them thereafter.

By Year 12, research shows less than half always use a condom when they have sex. Young people are known for taking risks under a misguided sense of invincibility. It's what drives them to speed once they've got their driver's licence or take an ecstasy pill from an unknown source.

But Dr Bourne doesn't believe teenagers really understand the risks of STIs from unprotected sex. ''Whereas we have done very well with HIV in terms of community awareness, the rate of awareness of STIs is substantially lower," he says. ''The national survey [of secondary students] demonstrates widespread confusion."

For example, 80 per cent didn't know that boys could get chlamydia. And nearly 60 per cent were unaware they could pick up gonorrhoea from oral sex. This is more relevant now, as oral sex becomes increasingly mainstream, spawning new medical slang such as ''P&O throat", a term coined by an inner-city GP to describe oral infections picked up by young people on cruise holidays.

Professor Pitts believes the rise in oral sex among young people is more of a ''moral panic" than a major source of disease. ''There are potential health risks associated with oral sex but quite frankly, in the scheme of things, they are much less [than full intercourse]," she says. Genital herpes, which is incurable but can be controlled with medication, can also be spread through oral sex.

Experts agree that governments, teachers and the media have key roles in tackling the STI epidemic among young Australians through ongoing awareness campaigns.

Make time to talk

Closer to home, it's even more important for parents to drag the issue out from under the carpet. “Parents having honest discussions with their children helps form healthy attitudes towards sex, getting checked and condom use," Dr Bourne says. ''This is about sex, and people feel nervous about these discussions generally, so without the support of public campaigns, it is harder."

It's not all bad news. Professor Pitts says a new survey, due out later this year, will show STI warnings are beginning to filter through. "There's an indication that it's improving, but it's from a very low base," she says. "I think the time is absolutely right for getting messages around STIs out to the general population. The most important message is to get tested. The earlier it is treated, the better."


Via Alexis Hubble
Nicholas Kyriakoudes's insight:

This article relates to the risk involved with unprotected sex when the younger population wants to ''experiment'' with sex, unprotected. The article also talks about how campaigns and lessons about unprotected sex and its consequences aren't taught or discussed about in public schools. This is a major factor as to why younger people in particular, teenagers, don't know the risk of having unprotected sex. Its because they are uneducated in this area. I believe this must be changed and some active action must be taken swiftly by the government to introduce programs, campaigns, and lessons into public schools around the country. The education of the youth just like in any area {science, maths, culture, religion, no to racism, acceptance} is key to the out view and perspective of generations to come. In other words, if we teach the children of today about unprotected sex, the children of tomorrow will already have the foundations of these previous campaigns and programs their parents took to rely on and draw knowledge form, there will already be programs in place.      

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Alexis Hubble's curator insight, May 17, 2014 5:01 AM

This article is about the risk of unprotected sex and how the awareness of the risks is very low in schools and the public. It also discusses the consequences of this unawareness. This is related in class to show us the consequences of unprotected sex. My thoughts is that is a good article to show everyone the consequences and to teach us about what could happen.

Ruby Pallone's curator insight, November 25, 2014 10:06 PM

This article " How to educate your teen about sex" is explaining the surging rates of sexually transmissible infections [STIs] among young Australians which is said to be no longer ignored. This is because the rates are increasing immensely and infections and diseases are being passed on with unprotected sex. They did a study, including the year 10 to 12 age group range and the results found that by Year 12, less than half always use a condom when they have sex. Young people are known for taking risks under a misguided sense of invincibility.It was also mentioned in the article that young people have very little knowledge about common STIs, including chlamydia, herpes, gonorrhoea and genital warts. Nor do they feel comfortable going to their doctor for testing or treatment. This is showing that  more education and public awareness and knowledge needs to be taught about STI's is needed.

 

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6 Things You Should Know About Men And Eating Disorders

6 Things You Should Know About Men And Eating Disorders | Nicholas' Year 9 Journal | Scoop.it
Eating disorders aren't just a "woman thing." People of all gender identifications, ages, races and sexualities suffer from eating disorders and struggle with body image issues, but the majority of eating disorder research is conducted on young,...
Nicholas Kyriakoudes's insight:

This article is about eating disorders with men and the effect they can have on their mental status. It stats that eating disorder don't just happen to women but they also happen to men, and they don't just effect their physical presence but also their mental being. The article goes on to sate what people should know about when men have eating disorders. It often sated that men hide their problems. I believe that this article is somewhat helpful in providing information about eating disorders effect on men. It more so describes the mental effects of eating disorders on men. I believe this article is a nice addition to my journal collection. 

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psu2a9's curator insight, December 7, 2013 4:22 PM

The rise to show men can get ED too seems to be very prevelant in the media at the moment 

Alexis Fowler's curator insight, February 27, 2014 9:14 AM

I like this article is because it proves that anyone can go threw an eating disorder and its just not a certain person or gender.

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Strong support for tougher alcohol laws (Aus)

New research suggests there is strong support for tougher laws aimed at tackling alcohol-related violence and drunkenness.

Via ReGenUC
Nicholas Kyriakoudes's insight:

This article outlines the Nsw populations growing concern for alcohol  feud violence in the state. The article backs up these concerns with facts and statistics. I believe that this article isn't very informative and persuasive in changing the opinions of the audience. I think that the statistics are very good in backing up the argument put across but i believe if people really want this issue to change there going to have to put in right in the faces of politicians and the population. This would involving public education campaigns, advertisement campaigns, in the news, tv, internet, and in other places with other ways. However this requires money, money which the general population pushing for this change just doesn't have. 

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ReGenUC's curator insight, March 25, 2014 6:48 PM

More #AlcPoll2014 coverage.

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Caution urged in alcohol-violence counter measures

Caution urged in alcohol-violence counter measures | Nicholas' Year 9 Journal | Scoop.it
Alcohol-affected violence is not new to Sydney streets, it started with colonisation. However, patterns of such conduct, now fuelled also by drugs (especially amphetamines and steroids), do change.
Nicholas Kyriakoudes's insight:

This article is about the violence on sydney's streets and what the government is trying to prevent any further tragedies. The article states that alcohol fuelled violence is not new to sydney and that it has been occurring since colonisation. The article goes on to talk about incidents on Sydney's streets,in particular those on Kings Cross. The article goes on to explain what the government is trying to do to minimise alcohol feud violence. 

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Safer Sydney: Alcohol link to young criminals

Safer Sydney: Alcohol link to young criminals | Nicholas' Year 9 Journal | Scoop.it
About 70 per cent of young people in custody in NSW were drunk when they committed their crime, juvenile justice officials say, adding weight to calls for tougher government action to tackle booze-fuelled harm.
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Nicholas Kyriakoudes's curator insight, November 20, 2014 2:20 AM

I believe that this article shows alot about how alcohol can affect young people and their actions. I believe stricter laws should be introduced to lower the use of underage drinkers and also how many people break the law because alcohol. This is a disgusting part of Australian culture, its Bogan to drink because its ''cool''. Education, education, education. Education is key if our Country is to break this mentality that drinking till you get drunk is ''cool''. 

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New research finds Australian uni students rely on drugs to help them study

Many Australian university students are relying on performance enhancing drugs to help them boost their averages.

Via ReGenUC
Nicholas Kyriakoudes's insight:

This article by the ABC indicates a bizarre and sad number of students that use drugs such as: caffeine, alcohol, ice, canibas, tabaco,etc. to help them study for university. Depending on what the students are studying they will either take drugs that stimulate or depress their bodies to a state where they ''feel or think'' they are studying better. Doctors and researchers have indicated however that this does not work and is bad for the body to get into this habit as they will became heavily dependent on these addictive drugs. I believe that it is quite sad and distressing that some people have to take and use drugs to make themselves ''feel or think'' they are studying better when in fact it is setting them up for drug addictions which is very hard to break. I think this must be raised and released even more into the public eye and people who do this must be shamed and pressured into stopping, after all there only going to hurt themselves and the ones they love. This is a problem if more people continue to take these risky choices. 

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ReGenUC's curator insight, October 27, 2013 7:26 PM

It will be interesting to see the results of this study.  Given recent attention to AOD misuse by medical professionals, we'd suggest that establishing these patterns of use at uni will be likely to lead to increased problems once our next generation of doctors, nurses and paramedics join the workforce.

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Australia Gives Up On Filtering Child Porn | Huff Post Tech

Australia Gives Up On Filtering Child Porn | Huff Post Tech | Nicholas' Year 9 Journal | Scoop.it

The Australian government has abandoned its 5-year-old pledge to mandate a filter blocking child pornography and other objectionable Internet content.

 

Communications Minister Stephen Conroy said Friday that instead of a compulsory filter being imposed, Internet service providers have agreed to block 1,400 child abuse websites on INTERPOL's "worst of" list.

 

Three of Australia's largest telecommunications companies — Telstra, Optus and Primus — have been blocking the listed sites since 2010.

 

"We've actually reached agreement with the industry to block child pornography and we think that is a significant step forward," Conroy told Australian Broadcasting Corp. radio.

 

Critics had said the proposed legislated filter would have put Australia in the same censorship league as China. Even the U.S. State Department expressed concerns about the proposed regulations, which would have been some of the most restrictive among the world's democracies.

 

The new plan has a narrower focus on child abuse. The government's proposed compulsory nationwide filter would have also banned a regularly updated list of sites that also carried extreme violence as well as detailed instructions in crime, drug use or terrorist acts.

 

Opponents argued that the filter would slow Internet speeds, erroneously block harmless sites and restrict free speech.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Nicholas Kyriakoudes's insight:

This article is about the blocking, filtering and censoring of child pornography in Australia. This article links back to our class work about safety on the internet and what to or not to put on or see on the web. The  Australian government has scrapped its plans to block sites and materials contain child pornography themselves and has now given responsibility to the internet providers themselves. Australia is one of the strictest ''blockers'' of sites in the world, a title that i think is necessarily bad. Its not your right because you live in a ''free country'' or ''democracy'' to be able to access child pornography. Weather its been put there deliberately or not, I believe its both the Governments and internet providers responsibility to block these material and take them down from the web.    

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Teenage baby boom sparks call for better sex education

Teenage baby boom sparks call for better sex education | Nicholas' Year 9 Journal | Scoop.it

This article is about how a growth in teenage pregnancys is sparking calls for better sex education in schools. It gives some reasons to why teenagers become pregnant and show the increase of this fact.


Via Stephanie McEwan
Nicholas Kyriakoudes's insight:

This article form the Sydney Morning Herald refers to the growing concern from the general public for teenage pregnancy and how the average age for pregnancy in Australia {and NZ} is dropping. This change is being referred to as a ''teenage baby boom''. But many people in the public in particular teenagers aren't alarmed by 14,15, or 16 year old children having babies. The public now see it as the ''norm'' theres nothing unusually with it. This is a worry as many of these views and opinions have been carved by the experiences and un knowingness of these people. The article is ultimately stating facts and pushing for more education campaigns and programs to open the roof on this issue and real the true facts and effects peoples lives. Pregnancy doesn't just effect on person it effects many people either legally, professionally, social, mentally, physically, it just effects a whole person in every aspect. I do truly believe with this article and i believe the article should be playing a more active role in education teenagers so that this pregnancy rate can drop and with it the problems that occur.  

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Tessa Fergusson's curator insight, May 16, 2013 7:51 AM

The article suggest that there should be a better sex education in school as teen pregnancy as increased a bit over the years. Studies have shown that most teens are having unprotected sex, which can lead to becoming pregnant. The idea is to get information out to all teens in all area's, not just in some places.

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Premier pledges to take action on alcohol-fuelled violence

Premier pledges to take action on alcohol-fuelled violence | Nicholas' Year 9 Journal | Scoop.it
Pubs and clubs in Sydney's most popular entertainment districts will be hit with a 3am alcohol curfew - and harsh mandatory sentences for drunken attacks will be introduced within weeks under radical reforms to drive down violence.
Nicholas Kyriakoudes's insight:

This article is an article about the new restrictions that NSW premier Barry O'farral has introduced to pubs and clubs in Sydney. The new restrictions will lock out new customers to clubs at 1.30 am and will restrict the selling of drugs at 3.00am. I think that more action should be taken about this issue. I also think that the curfew should be at some time around 10-11pm instead of in the moring. 

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Lives and crimes: Kids who suffer foetal alcohol spectrum disorder

Lives and crimes: Kids who suffer foetal alcohol spectrum disorder | Nicholas' Year 9 Journal | Scoop.it
Children who suffer from foetal alcohol syndrome are much more likely to fall into crime.
Nicholas Kyriakoudes's insight:

This article is about children suffering disorders because their mothers drank alcohol whilst they were pregnant. Many of these children suffer related symptoms because of their disorder such as being impatient, impulsive, poor memory, and short attention spam. Many of these children are in and out of juve and are already involved in crime from a young age. These disorders are a lifelong injury and cant be cured, these disorders increases the chance of the children being involved in crime and go to jail in the future. The article goes on to state facts and statistics related to these disorders.  

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