Paving the Way through Journalism
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Paving the Way through Journalism
How to create a successful career in journalism.
Curated by Julia Goetz
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Journalism Jobs & Careers

Journalism Jobs & Careers | Paving the Way through Journalism | Scoop.it

Different Kinds of Journalism Jobs - Journalism Careers

Julia Goetz's insight:

Journalism involves many different career paths.  Editors play an important role in the production of newspapers.  They edit stories, handle reporters and write headlines.  Many journalists start out by working at weekly community newspapers.  These newspapers are distributed locally and are commonly found outside stores and businesses.  The next step for many journalists is a job at a mid-sized daily newspaper in a small city.  The circulation of these papers ranges from 50,000 to 100,000 readers.

 

For many journalists, working at the Associated Press is an exciting but challenging job.  Careers at the Associated Press include radio, television, the web, graphics and photography.  Amazingly, the Associated Press is the world's largest and oldest news entity.  The individual bureaus of the Associated Press, however, are small with only a select few editors and reporters creating the articles.  Covering the White House is even more prestigious for journalists.  The members of the White House press corps attend news conferences and question the President or important members of his staff on major political issues.  

 

The article achieves its goal of providing an overview on the positions available in the field of journalism.  I learned that a journalist needs to go through a process of developing skills and climbing steps to success.  Becoming a journalist is difficult but rewarding.  I would like to skip all the steps and go straight to questioning the President, but I know that is not realistic.

 

Rogers, Tony. "Journalism Jobs & Careers." About.com Journalism. About.com, n.d. Web. 03 Jan. 2013.

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Hannah Valente's comment, January 13, 2013 8:03 PM
In Julia’s article, on Journalism Jobs and Careers, she tells us that Journalism involves many different career paths. Editors play huge roles for Journalists, “Just as the military has a chain of command, newspapers have a hierarchy of editors responsible for various aspects of the operation. All editors edit stories to one extent or another, but assignment editors deal with reporters, while copy editors write headlines and often do layout.” Journalists can work at Weekly Community Newspapers, Mid-Sized Newspapers, working at the associated press, or even covering the White House! Journalists can start at many different places and change papers very frequently, or stay with the same paper their whole lives. Julia did a great job and introduced me to possibly becoming a journalist too. Through this is not my first career path it is a very rewarding and exciting job! Julia also brought up how many readers read these journalists’ works every day and I think that has to be the most rewarding part of the job. Any job where you can make a difference in someone lives, make them believe in what you are saying, or change their minds completely does sound like a career for very creative and intelligent people like Julia!
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Advice for Students Interested in a Career in Journalism | Project for Excellence in Journalism (PEJ)

Julia Goetz's insight:

For students considering a career in journalism, a curious mind and a liberal arts education are the two most important qualifications.  An undergraduate liberal arts education allows you to experience many different fields of study.  It also teaches a student how to think critically and not just accept ideas without analyzing the facts.  A liberal arts education is an opportunity to develop a strong ethical basis.  This broad type of undergraduate education should be followed by graduate studies in journalism.  

 

The skills needed for journalism can be expanded by writing for a college newspaper or radio station.  They can also widen by working for a television station that broadcasts college reports or corresponding for local, regional or national news stations.  Working in a local community during the school year or after graduation is a rewarding experience.  If you spend time with the people of a community, you are more likely to write fair and accurate reports about the important events of their lives. Reading books, including classics in fiction, builds understanding of human nature and the human condition.  Modeling and critically following other journalists' works can influence your writing.

 

The author of this article helped me realize the skills I need to develop in order to write well.  I enjoyed learning new information about journalism, and the job appeals to me even more.

 

Kovach, Bill. "Advice for Students Interested in a Career in Journalism." Project for Excellence in Journalism (PEJ). Journalism.org, n.d. Web. 03 Jan. 2013.

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Why I Decided Against a Career in Journalism

Why I Decided Against a Career in Journalism | Paving the Way through Journalism | Scoop.it

A young reader explains his decision not to pursue a journalism career.

Julia Goetz's insight:

In a letter to the editor of The New York Times, a young college student, James R. Simmons Jr., describes his decision against a career in journalism.  Mr. Simmons was responding to the article, “Journalism’s Misdeeds Get a Glance in the Mirror,” by David Carr, which discussed the phone-hacking scandal in Great Britain.  He pointed out that the journalists involved in the scandal were reacting to consumer demands.  Readers want to know about the private lives of celebrities and the details of their lives.   According to Mr. Simmons, readers are also to blame for the scandalous behavior of journalists.  They continue to subscribe to tabloids that encourage journalists to go to extremes to grasp readers' attention. 

 

Mr. Simmons states that he has held a top position on his college newspaper for the past three years.  He recently decided to discontinue his path toward a journalism career.  He would return to journalism only if the media makes the pursuit of truth its goal.  

 

I agree with Mr. Simmons that the recent phone-hacking scandal reflects poorly upon the profession of journalism.  As a journalist, however, I would only write articles based on the truth.  I think Mr. Simmons should not give up because we need journalists who care about the truth.  

 

Simmons, James R. "Http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/06/opinion/why-i-decided-against-a-career-in-journalism.html." The Opinion Pages. The New York Times, 5 Aug. 2012. Web. 

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Julia Robinson's comment, January 14, 2013 12:03 AM
In this article, Mr. Simmons talks about flaws in current media coverage. While it is true that the magazines and newspapers chose what to publish, it is the public demand that dictates what they do. I agree with Mr. Simmons - the public buys and asks for what they turn on the reporters for writing about. They cannot blame the journalists for trying to keep their jobs. If what is being published really so unethical, then people should stop buying it. I am not familiar with the recent phone-hacking scandal, but I am sure that whatever the journalists were doing was to keep up with the competitive and fierce attitude of the journalism industry. I also find it interesting that Mr. Simmons is so willing to give up his job that he is obviously passionate about just because of one thing that happened. He had the job for three years, and he just quit not only that job, but the whole business of journalism. I also agree with Julia in that Mr. Simmons should not loose faith in the entire journalism community because he is certainly not the only person who feels this way. I think that I would like a career in journalism, but it is not my first choice.
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Careers in Photojournalism

Careers in Photojournalism | Paving the Way through Journalism | Scoop.it
A social learning network of communities and experts to help you get ahead in education so you can get ahead in life!

 

Julia Goetz's insight:

Photojournalism is the communication through images.  The photographs and videos tell a story.  Photojournalists can work freelance and sell their pictures to various media organizations.  They can also work for newspapers, agencies, and magazines such as National Geographic.  The US Associated Press is the most famous news agency for photojournalists.  Experience as a photojournalist can also lead to careers in public relations, advertising and marketing.  

 

Studying photojournalism includes reporting and writing, news judgment and camera operations and lighting.  The job of photojournalism requires the photographer to exhibit the ability to meet deadlines and work under pressure.  Photojournalists must possess a broad knowledge of global affairs.  Other qualifications include objectivity and ethics, quick decision-making, and artistic and technical skills in photography.  Photojournalism can also be a demanding and even dangerous job, for example, photographing conflicts in war zones.

 

This article really sparked my interest in photojournalism.  My ideal job would be to photograph nature and submit my work to National Geographic.  This job would allow me to combine my love of travel with photographing nature.  Although this article encouraged my curiosity in photojournalism, it did not provide any practical information such as schooling, salary ranges, and availability of photojournalism jobs. 

 

Tiffany. "Careers in Photojournalism." LearnHub. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Jan. 2013.  

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Paul Lorenc's comment, January 13, 2013 11:31 PM
In this article the author talks about how many options there are for a career in photojournalism. I am surprised to learn that this career has a wide field of options. Also how many job opportunities there are from working in a war zone to exploring the amazon it sounds amazing. But at the same time it seems quite dangerous too! But at the same time very rewarding. The amount of work a person needs to do to prepare for this career seems unreal, and challenging. So that may or may not be a deal breaker for me. But all the work aside it seems that being able to work as a photojournalist is a very challenging job, but also a great way to travel the world and get paid to do so
Michael Yango's comment, January 15, 2013 12:17 AM
I think that the goal of this article was to explain the importance of pictures and videos in getting a point across. Visual images actually show the public events that are actually happening in the world today. The reactions to the stories that people hear about are different when they are printed in text, so people might have a different reaction when looking at pictures and graphics. Photojournalism is a difficult job to take, but it is rewarding. It offers many career paths, and is good for most media like magazines and newspapers. Photojournalism in this case can either be good or bad in my opinion. It is good because it adds more depth to the stories or articles, but there are also some negative sides that I can think of. I think this mainly because the photographers taking these pictures might document something horrible to see, such as the aftermath of wars. I would not my newspapers to be full of gore and violence. I would not like to have this career, despite the chances of traveling around the globe. I think it is dangerous to be taking pictures in the middle of war zones for the sake of a job. In my eyes, it is too risky.
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11 Journalism Jobs You May Hold in the Future | Center for Sustainable Journalism

11 Journalism Jobs You May Hold in the Future | Center for Sustainable Journalism | Paving the Way through Journalism | Scoop.it
Julia Goetz's insight:

As technology evolves, print media is beginning to fade.  The Internet is a quicker, easier way to access information so people look to the web for news. This change in the media, however, does not mean that journalism as a profession is dying.  Many new jobs for journalists are becoming available.  

 

One of the new possible jobs is headline optimizer.  This position includes creating headlines using keywords.  Headlines are the way people search and click on the stories.  Another job is story scientist where the journalist investigates data to create digital content.  Story scientists utilize analytics to assemble information that is more shareable.  Two other options for a journalist are working as a curator in chief or an explanatory journalist.  Curators manage the mounds of information available today.  Like curators in chief, explanatory journalists also deal with extensive information.  This type of journalist answers questions news stories leave open.  Finally, some other positions are social media reporters, data detectives, viral meme checkers, slideshow specialists, networker, e-book creator and web developer. 

 

Overall, I learned quite a bit of information about future jobs for journalists.  However, I thought the descriptions of the various jobs were vague and unhelpful.  The article did not help me decide what kind of job I would want to do in the future.  

 

Oberst, Lindsay. "11 Journalism Jobs You May Hold in the Future." Kennesaw State University. Sustainable Journalism.org, n.d. Web. 05 Jan. 2013.

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Media & Journalism Careers

Media & Journalism Careers | Paving the Way through Journalism | Scoop.it

Learn about media and journalism careers, from traditional reporter positions to new media opportunities. Get information about salary and more.

Julia Goetz's insight:

A career in journalism can include traditional jobs such as reporting the news in newspapers and editing articles.  Today, journalism also extends to bloggers, social media specialists, and announcers and disk jockeys who work in radio and television.  On the business side of journalism, advertisers and marketers compose ads and commercials for magazines, television, and radio.  Translators and interpreters are needed to communicate with non-English speaking audiences and customers.  Grant writers try to find sources of financing for their media companies and write proposals to government agencies and private donors.

 

Salaries in all fields of journalism vary greatly depending on geographic location.  A job writing for a small town newspaper pays less than a position as a journalist in a big city market.  Level of experience and the particular media will also impact a journalist's salary.  For example, newspaper reporters receive a median salary around 33,000 annually while workers in television and radio earn an average salary of 37,000.  Additionally, advertising agents generally earn about 46,000 a year.  Between 2008-2018 the jobs of reporters, news correspondents and other journalists are anticipated to decline by 6 percent.  By contrast, in the coming years, advertising positions should grow about 8 percent and jobs as interpreters and translators by around 22 percent.   

 

I thought the article was very helpful because it provided practical information about the field of journalism.  I learned about average salaries for many positions and the possible availability of jobs in the future.

 

"Media & Journalism Careers." College Degree Programs Online Schools Career Profiles MyFootpathcom Media Journalism Careers Comments. My FootPath, n.d. Web. 13 Jan. 2013. 

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Alessia Guise's comment, January 13, 2013 10:52 PM
I thought that Julia's reflection was very interesting. Journalism is actually something I have thought about doing. It used to be that journalism was just what was written in the newspaper or said on the news, but now it comes in many forms such as blogs, social media specialists, and announcers. Journalism has exposed scandals in government, influence the public, and inform the people of every terrible thing that happens everyday. What Julia wrote about salaries was really interesting. She said that reporter and news correspondents' salary will go down by 6 percent, while advertisers will go up 8 percent, and interpreters and translators will go up 22 percent. If someone was looking for a career in journalism and wants to make a lot of money, they could read this article and find that being an interpreter or translator might be the better career path for them.
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Society of Professional Journalists: For Young Journalists

We’re excited to hear that you are interested in a career in journalism.

 

Julia Goetz's insight:

Journalism is a thriving field with jobs in print journalism, broadcasting, online journalism, industry and corporate communications and more.  Students considering a career in journalism should select a college with a strong program in communications.  These kinds of programs will expose students to the broad subjects of communications and to professionals in the field.  

 

Students in the communications program will be studying the core curriculum for communications degree, courses such as writing, reporting and ethics.  They should also pick their electives carefully.  As journalists, they will be writing about many different subjects and so will need a deep understanding of a variety of issues.  Students definite about the type of reporting in which they want to concentrate should select electives in that field. For example, a student interested in business reporting should take classes in the business department.  

 

As early as possible, students should become involved with their college newspaper, television or radio station.  These practical experiences will supplement what they learn from their professors in the classroom.  Students should also volunteer in the community journalism groups.  Even if they are not paid, they will learn a great deal that will help their future careers as journalists.

 

This article was very beneficial since it taught me how to begin my profession in journalism.  The author explained in depth the path to take in college.

 

"Society of Professional Journalists: For Young Journalists." Society of Professional Journalists: For Young Journalists. Society of Professional Journalists, n.d. Web. 05 Jan. 2013. 

 

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