Paul Bonanno's Portfolio
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Paul Bonanno's Portfolio
My 2011 CMC Portfolio of Work
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L.L.Bean: Shop Catalogs Online

L.L.Bean: Shop Catalogs Online | Paul Bonanno's Portfolio | Scoop.it

Web 1.0 is the stage of the World Wide Web which basically has one function for the user and that is to read the content. There is normally no feed back just searching for information and reading it. There is very little interaction or ability to contribute to the site yourself. The main goal for a Web 1.0 website is to make the information of their site available to anyone at any time. Shopping carts are part of Web 1.0. When we went on the LL Bean site and searched for products, this was an example of this. There was no interaction, just finding products and reading about them.


The Nonprofitorg article defines Web 1.0 as one person or organization pushing content out to many people via websites. The shopping cart example follows this definition because they are just pushing out the products to the consumer. The website provides detail about the product but does not really do much for the customer to give feedback or really interact with the organization in general.


http://nonprofitorgs.wordpress.com/2010/01/28/web-1-0-web-2-0-and-web-3-0-simplified-for-nonprofits/

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Web 2.0 - Paul's Personal Blog

Web 2.0 - Paul's Personal Blog | Paul Bonanno's Portfolio | Scoop.it

My personal blog is absolutely a form of Web 2.0. My blog allows me to create and update content over time. Blogs allow users to post or comment on other user's blogs freely. My blog allows others to read any posts I have done and also gives the reader the ability to comment and give feedback on what they read. This is an excellent example of Web 2.0 because you are able to share information and also give feedback on the information that is shared.


The Nonprofitorg article states that Web 2.0 is the beginning of two-way communication in the online public commons. My blog definitely has two way communication. Not only do I post blogs but it gives the reader the ability to interact and give feedback with me as well.


Nonprofitorgs (2010). Web 1.0, Web 2.0 and Web 3.0 Simplified for Nonprofits. Available at: http://nonprofitorgs.wordpress.com/2010/01/28/web-1-0-web-2-0-and-web-3-0-simplified-for-nonprofits/

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Personal Facebook - Informal CMC

Personal Facebook - Informal CMC | Paul Bonanno's Portfolio | Scoop.it

Informal CMC is definitely shown by my personal Facebook page. My page was made up by myself on my own time which shows it was unscheduled and optional. I made my Facebook when I was in High School and only did it because many of my friends did at the time. My friends are made up of anyone I know who actually has made a profile themselves. There was no arrangement of the participants involved with my friends making it which is another example of how it is informal. The main part that makes my Facebook informal is the language. When I type on my Facebook I tend to abbreviate and use slang all over (For example I will type “u” instead of “you”) I have learned these bad habits from all the years of texting and instant messaging I did from a younger age. It is acceptable in regular conversations with friends but would be completely inappropriate if it was done for school or work.


The Hrastinksi article points out that informal interaction generally is “impromptu, brief and context rich.” This definitely describes what goes on when someone looks at my Facebook. A lot of the things written on there is spontaneous, brief random thoughts or conversations. The article also explains that informal communication is characterized by an experience focus rather than focused on content. A lot of the statuses and content on my page is driven from experience factors rather than being focused on a task. This is another great example to show the informal characteristics of my Facebook.


Hrastinski, S. (2010). Informal and formal dimensions of computer-mediated communication: A model. International Journal of Networking and Virtual Organisations, 7(1), 23-38. Available at: http://is2.lse.ac.uk/asp/aspecis/20080188.pdf

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Networking with Facebook

Networking with Facebook | Paul Bonanno's Portfolio | Scoop.it

Networking is very popular in today's society. Facebook has become arguably the most popular networking site over the last few years. Facebook gives me the opportunity to connect with many friends, classmates and family over a network. During the final project, my group used Facebook to connect with each other rather than using something like E-mail. We would send messages right to the group page in order to remain up to date. This was a quick way to stay updated with the group work rather than talking to one person at a time and wasting time. This was a great way to stay connected with each other even when we were outside of class and really helped us to complete the project in a efficient manner.


In the article by Boyd and Ellison it states that “Facebook is used to maintain existing offline relationships or solidify offline connections, as opposed to meeting new people.” Even though we did not really know each other in great detail before the project we still had a common offline element and this was the project. This project did allow our relationships to move past just partners but allowed us to talk more over the Facebook group page.


Boyd, d. m., & Ellison, N. B. (2007). "Social network sites: Definition, history, and scholarship." Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 13(1), article 11. Available at Library in eholdings database.

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Identity Development

Identity Development | Paul Bonanno's Portfolio | Scoop.it

Identity development is the process of creating an image and persona that best describes each individual. Online environments allow individuals to create their own identity. With this comes the greater possibility of misrepresentation. Some people may claim to have a great image and portray all different characteristics that may be all untrue. Unfortunately there are no visual cues online to show a person is as credible as they may portray. LinkedIn is a great way to develop a credible identity. A person's LinkedIn profile shows an individual's resume along with connecting it to many business networks. It is an excellent place for corporate recruiters to look at possible employees. The LinkedIn system also provides a safe way to build credibility. The first step is the profile completeness, this is a way for the user to provide all the information about themselves as they can. Next is the number of connections the user has with the ability to report an unwanted connection with the “I don't know this person” button. This prevents any users from falsely connecting to a random individual. The final step is having professional recommendations right on the site. This is an easy way to prove your credibility.


Ellison, N., Heino, R., & Gibbs, J. (2006). Managing impressions online: Self-presentation processes in the online dating environment. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 11(2), article 2.http://jcmc.indiana.edu/vol11/issue2/ellison.html

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Web 3.0 - Google Search and mobile devices

Web 3.0 - Google Search and mobile devices | Paul Bonanno's Portfolio | Scoop.it

Web 3.0 also called the Semantic Web is the newest version of the modes of communication. It is when the internet search engines find exactly what a user is looking for. This means there will be an intelligent search engine that will know exactly what the user is asking for and will respond with the best possible answers. The new Google search engine is a great example of this. As you are typing in the Google search box, suggestions come up with each letter you type to help you find exactly what you are looking for. It almost seems like the web is actually interacting with you as you type which is a pretty astonishing thing. This new technology makes searching for material much easier and helps find more material that would usually take much more effort.


This new Google search has also been incorporated with on mobile devices and Smartphones. The Nonprofitorg article states that the Web experience is no longer limited to desktop and laptop computers while stationary in one place. It is more of the Internet on the go fueled by mobile phones and tablets. Mobile websites such as Google have now been designed specifically for cell phones. This allows users to search for any material even when they are away from a computer. Technology is really amazing today and it is scary to think of what is to come in the future.


Nonprofitorgs (2010). Web 1.0, Web 2.0 and Web 3.0 Simplified for Nonprofits. Available at: http://nonprofitorgs.wordpress.com/2010/01/28/web-1-0-web-2-0-and-web-3-0-simplified-for-nonprofits/


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CMC Language - Facebook and Twitter

CMC Language - Facebook and Twitter | Paul Bonanno's Portfolio | Scoop.it

The Herring article defines computer-mediated discourse as the communication produced when human beings interact with one another by transmitting messages via networked computers. It also mentions that most CMC currently in use is text-based, meaning that the messages are typed on a keyboard and read as text on a computer screen. Both Facebook and Twitter portray CMC language. Facebook is full of messages that are typed on the keyboard. There are hundreds of status updates and messages found on my Facebook daily. Twitter has even more CMC language than Facebook for me. Depending on your Twitter account and how many people you follow, there are thousands of Tweets that show up on my time line every day. Many of them were typed on a keyboard using the Twitter network as a medium.


The article also talks about how computer-mediated language often contains non-standard features. This means that users use non conventional spelling and abbreviations when writing on either Facebook or Twitter. The article also makes an interesting point that only a relatively small percentage of these features appear to be caused by inattention or lack of knowledge of the standard language forms. This means that most people are typing like this on purpose in an effort to save time and energy. This is a great way of looking at all the CMC language that happens on Facebook and Twitter. Most of the users on both sites knowingly abbreviate and shorten the standard language for just this reason.


Herring, S. (Classification) (2007) A Faceted Classification Scheme for Computer-Mediated Discourse. Language@Internet (4). Available at http://www.languageatinternet.de/articles/2007/761/index_html/

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Formal CMC - Blogger

Formal CMC - Blogger | Paul Bonanno's Portfolio | Scoop.it

Blogger is a great example to show formal CMC. The personal blog was used by our class for specific assignments. There were multiple assignments given to us over the year and many of them were assigned to be done by a certain date. This showed both the mandatory and scheduled dimensions of formal CMC. Each topic of the blog was accomplished by following the directions given by the professor, which showed authority organization. On the blogs I made sure to stick to the topic and to focus on the task rather than personal ideas. Finally, I made sure to use formal language rather than online language or slang that a lot of people are used to when typing on a computer.


The Hrastinski article talks about how formal CMC is written in a formal dialogue. This means that the text is not written in instant message text, with slang and abbreviations. Formal grammar and punctuation is also a major point when discussing formal CMC. It is seen as informal and unprofessional to have simple grammar mistakes all over an assignment. Some of the assignments were to be done with partners and many times the professor chose our partners making her the clear authority organizing the class.


Hrastinski, S. (2010). Informal and formal dimensions of computer-mediated communication: A model. International Journal of Networking and Virtual Organisations, 7(1), 23-38. Available at: http://is2.lse.ac.uk/asp/aspecis/20080188.pdf

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Filtering and Curating with Twitter

Filtering and Curating with Twitter | Paul Bonanno's Portfolio | Scoop.it

Curating is the process of identifying and categorizing of certain resources. Curating can be done by individuals for many reasons including creating a unique category for a personal use. Twitter is a perfect example for this definition. For class we were able to access different websites and articles by searching specific hashtags meant specifically for our class. Many times we had different sites we would have to find or post on Twitter with the “#UACMC” posted next to it in order to separate it from the thousands of other tweets going on at the same time. Without these tags, it would be nearly impossible to find a specific tweet because the chances that one of the other million users has tweeted something similar to yours. Filtering is keeping out information that may not be relevant to an individual. Both curating and filtering take out many other tweets in order for you to have the most successful search option.


According to the Gormon article, “an average of 155 million tweets are posted on the social networking site Twitter each day.” If there was no option of curating or filtering it would be extremely difficult to find specific topics or tweets you are looking for. Another option is to filter what area of the world you are in. This allows the user a personal type of filtering so they can see trending topics that go on around them no matter where they are in the world or country.


Gorman, T. (2011) Social Media Curation Tool Storyful Helps Separate News From Noise. Available at

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2011/04/social-media-curation-tool-separates-news-from-noise.html

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Community Building

Community Building | Paul Bonanno's Portfolio | Scoop.it

A community can simply be defined as people being brought together. This could be by an interest, proximity to one another or a social cause. A community is people who have been brought together and connected in some way or another. Facebook is a great example of a community because it connects many individuals who may share the same proximity or interests. For example, our class has a group on Facebook. This allows all the students of our class to become part of a community within Facebook. We can all see what each other are up to and ask any questions with fellow classmates because we were all brought together by the same interest in the class.


According to the Ellison, Steinfeld and Lampe article, many people feel that they are part of the Facebook community. Being part of this community allows users to learn more about other people in class or to learn more about others who live near them. This is a great tool to start new relationships that past generations never had the opportunity to do. Another great aspect of Facebook is it allows you to keep in touch with old friends that you normally would fall out of touch with. Once again this allows users to stay apart of the social community even though they may have moved to a different school or area. Once they log on to Facebook they immediately become re attached to the community no matter where they are. Facebook has definitely been a great tool to help build and maintain different communities.



Ellison, N. B., Steinfield, C., & Lampe, C. (2007). The benefits of Facebook "friends:" Social capital and college students' use of online social network sites. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 12(4), article 1. http://jcmc.indiana.edu/vol12/issue4/ellison.html

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