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The White House Is Bribing Health Insurance Companies - Forbes

The White House Is Bribing Health Insurance Companies - Forbes | HealthMed News | Scoop.it
The White House Is Bribing Health Insurance Companies Forbes Hidden in the midst of a 436 page regulatory update, and written in pure bureaucratese, the Department of Health and Human Services asked that insurance companies limit the looming...
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How to use your health care coverage - Bangor Daily News

How to use your health care coverage - Bangor Daily News | HealthMed News | Scoop.it
How to use your health care coverage
Bangor Daily News
It's great to have the security and peace of mind that comes from having quality health insurance, but it's important to understand when, where and how to use your coverage.
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Why Healthcare Marketers Should Embrace Social Media

Why Healthcare Marketers Should Embrace Social Media | HealthMed News | Scoop.it

Under the Affordable Care Act, quality healthcare is becoming less expensive for Americans, which means more people are seeking services. Physicians are seeing an influx of patients and must manage the demand. In addition to more patients, practitioners are also burdened with more paperwork. The Doctor Blog indicated the increasing amount of paperwork accounts for an extra one to four hours of work every day. Given this trend, face-to-face interaction time with patients may suffer. With less in-office communication, doctors need to engage with patients using other means.

Healthcare Marketers Use Social Media to Connect with Patients
Maintaining an online presence is an ideal way for doctors to continue communications with patients outside of the office. Healthcare marketers are utilizing social media channels to reach patients. It's a promising outlet because it's where people spend a lot of their time communicating with others. At any given moment, individuals may be scrolling through their Facebook news feed or skimming through LinkedIn posts. According to Jeff Bullas, a social media marketing strategist, people in the U.S. spend 16 percent of each hour online using Facebook, and 23 percent of users log in to the network at least 5 times a day.

Social Media Helps Doctors Forge and Sustain Relationships with Patients
When healthcare professionals dive into the social media pool, they have the unique ability to serve as thought leaders and interact with both current and potential patients. By answering health-related questions and offering advice, healthcare professionals will spur further dialogue with patients.

Using social media also helps start conversations with prospective patients. This is because potential patients may come across physicians' posts on Twitter and visit their websites for more information. If doctors' offerings resonate with users and meet their needs, these individuals are more likely to schedule appointments. After coming in for visits, doctors can bring the conversation back online to further build those relationships outside of the brief office visits. 

Healthcare Professionals Enjoy a Strong Return on Marketing Investment
There are other reasons why social media is a beneficial communications tool for healthcare marketers. Physicians Practice indicated it is the most cost-effective way to target potential patients. Instead of buying advertising space in a newspaper or purchasing time on the radio, marketers most likely won't have to spend a dime targeting patients via social media. This beneficial and inexpensive communication tool is here to stay and will serve as an effective way to engage patients.

 


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FDA Looks to Urge Companies to Tweet Drug Risks

FDA Looks to Urge Companies to Tweet Drug Risks | HealthMed News | Scoop.it

The FDA is looking into a new way to regulate drugs and medical devices—by using social media. The agency has drafted social media guidelines that would urge drug companies to use platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube, to educate the public about the risks of their prescription drug or medical device.

The draft guidelines, which are currently under review by the agency, propose that companies be required to use the “character space constraints” on social media platforms such as Twitter to tweet the risks, along with the benefits, of a product. The guidelines also recommend that manufacturers include a link that takes readers to more information about the product. In the case of Twitter, that information should all be included in a single tweet.

    If a firm concludes that adequate benefit and risk information, as well as other required information, cannot all be communicated within the same character-space-limited communication, then the firm should reconsider using that platform for the intended promotional message.

If approved, the guidelines will become the first formal recommendation by the agency regarding manufacturers’ use of social media.


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US Military developing brain implants to restore memory

US Military developing brain implants to restore memory | HealthMed News | Scoop.it

The U.S. military has chosen two universities to lead a program to develop brain implants to restore memory to veterans who have suffered brain injuries, officials said at a news conference Tuesday.

 

The Restoring Active Memory (RAM) program is a project of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the branch of the U.S. Department of Defense charged with developing next-generation technologies for the military. The initiative aims to develop wireless, fully implantable "neuroprosthetics" for service members suffering from traumatic brain injury or illness, DARPA Program Manager Justin Sanchez said at the news conference.

 

DARPA has selected two teams of researchers to develop the implants: The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and the University of Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia.

 

Currently, few treatments for TBI-related memory loss exist, but DARPA is trying to change that, Sanchez said. Deep brain stimulation, the use of implanted electrodes to deliver electrical signals to specific parts of the brain, has already demonstrated success in treating Parkinson's disease and other chronic brain conditions. Building on these advances, "we're developing new neuroprosthetics to bridge the gap in an injured brain to restore memory function," Sanchez said.

 

The UCLA team will focus on studying memory processes in the entorhinal cortex, an area of the brain known as the gateway of memory formation. Researchers will stimulate and record from neurons in patients with epilepsy who already have brain implants as part of their monitoring and treatment. The researchers will also develop computer models of how to stimulate the brain to re-establish memory function.

 

 

The University of Pennsylvania team will focus more on modeling how brain circuits work together more broadly, especially those in the brain's frontal cortex, an area involved in the formation of long-term memories. The university is collaborating with Minneapolis-based biomedical device company Medtronic to develop a memory prosthesis system.

 

  more at http://www.foxnews.com/science/2014/07/09/us-military-developing-brain-implants-to-restore-memory/ ;


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5 Myths About Consumer Use of Digital Healthcare Services

5 Myths About Consumer Use of Digital Healthcare Services | HealthMed News | Scoop.it

A recent international survey by the McKinsey & Company consulting firm addresses some myths about consumer use of digital healthcare services.

 

Many healthcare executives believe that, due to the sensitive nature of medical care, patients don’t want to use digital services except in a few specific situations. Decision makers often cite relatively low usage of digital healthcare services. Results of this survey however reveal something quite different. 

 

The 5 myths debunked by this survey are as follows

Myth 1: People don’t want to use digital services for healthcareMyth 2: Only young people want to use digital services

Myth 3: Mobile health is the game changerMyth 4: Patients want innovative features and appsMyth 5: A comprehensive platform of service offerings is a prerequisite for creating value

More at http://www.healthdatamanagement.com/gallery/5-myths-about-consumer-use-of-digital-healthcare-services-48388-1.html

 

 


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To err is human... Avoid these common medicine missteps - Philly.com (blog)

To err is human... Avoid these common medicine missteps - Philly.com (blog) | HealthMed News | Scoop.it
Philly.com (blog)
To err is human... Avoid these common medicine missteps Philly.com (blog) When it comes to medicines, you may already know how essential it is to exactly follow the instructions of your healthcare provider or directions on...
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Virus detected in baby 'cured' of HIV

Virus detected in baby 'cured' of HIV | HealthMed News | Scoop.it
A Mississippi baby scientists said was "functionally cured" of HIV now has detectable levels of the virus. Learn more about the Mississippi baby HIV case. (HIV virus now detected in child that scientists previously said was functionally cured.
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Health Insurers Are Trying New Payment Models, Study Shows - New York Times

Health Insurers Are Trying New Payment Models, Study Shows - New York Times | HealthMed News | Scoop.it
New York Times Health Insurers Are Trying New Payment Models, Study Shows New York Times Health insurers are experimenting with new formulas for reimbursing doctors and hospitals, slowly moving away from the traditional approach of basing payments...
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Integrative medicine addresses the root causes of illness - The Courier-Journal

Integrative medicine addresses the root causes of illness - The Courier-Journal | HealthMed News | Scoop.it
Guardian Liberty Voice Integrative medicine addresses the root causes of illness The Courier-Journal Integrative: “I'm an adult medicine specialist who practices integrative medicine, an emerging subspecialty that addresses the root causes of...
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Can Software Make Health Data More Private? - Technology Review

Can Software Make Health Data More Private? - Technology Review | HealthMed News | Scoop.it
Software could prevent sensitive medical data from being inadvertently shared as health records get passed around.
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The Health Burden of Stress: What We Can Do About It | The Forum at HSPH

For many of us, stress is an omnipresent and frequently overwhelming factor of day-to-day life. As we begin to better understand its toll on our health, this Forum at the Harvard School of...
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iPatientCare Updates the miGlass Wearable EHR App Platform

iPatientCare Updates the miGlass Wearable EHR App Platform | HealthMed News | Scoop.it

iPatientCare announced the update of the miGlasss, the first wearable EHR App for the Google Glass, by adding options healthcare professionals will be able to exploit in their day-to-day activities by addressing the new demands a connected working environment presents.

 

According to iPatientCare, its goal was to give care givers the ability to interact with their patients by accessing the right information whenever they need it to deliver better care.

 

The new version extends functionality available on the iPad, Android and web to Google Glass. This gives physicians and other practitioners access to patient information while in mid-care, without having to go to their desktop computers, laptops, or tablets to retrieve it. Whether it is X-Rays or MRIs, physicians will now be able to see what they need in real-time.

 

"We constantly work to explore how doctors can achieve better access to the right information at the right time so they can focus on providing better care to the patients. Physicians are looking for ways to spending quality time with patients rather than spending it on bureaucratic tasks such as entering data into a computer. The ease of use on both ends, namely, the Glass and the EHR, makes the difference,"said Kedar Mehta, CTO, iPatientCare.

 

 

The technology available on the miGlass includes:

Web browser based EHR and PM SystemMicrosoft .net TechnologyServices Oriented ArchitectureHL7 CCD and ASTM CCR for InteroperabilityHL7 Integration with leading LabInformation SystemsSureScripts/RxHUB Certified ePrescribingReporting & Analytics using Cognos and Business ObjectsAvailable on iPhone and iPad  

The miGlass app can also be used by patients to provide medication reminders, appointments, alerts, and patient education. Engaging patients with a device they have with them at all times means they will be less likely to make mistakes with their medication, or miss any other kind of therapy, by delivering real-time information.


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Researchers give FDA social media advice

Researchers give FDA social media advice | HealthMed News | Scoop.it

Researchers from Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital are offering a bit of internet advice for the Food and Drug Administration: do more.

The recommendations were published in a New England Journal of Medicine Perspective column, a chaser of sorts to the social media guidance the FDA published for the pharmaceutical industry earlier this month.

The short of it is that the researchers say the FDA can and should do more to disseminate drug safety information. In some instances it is just a matter of being smarter about the information it has on hand and making it easier for patients to find. As an example, the researchers note that the regulator pours safety information into its MedWatch site, and the site Drugs@ FDA is home base for electronic drug labels, which include dosing information and contraindications, but “there is no obvious link between these two resources.”

They also note that the regulator could do a better job with the social media outreach it has by integrating Twitter and Facebook access with its web presence. They note the regulator has a hefty following for its @FDA_Drug_Info handle and a relatively thin following for its @FDAMedWatch Twitter feed, but both could do more if they were part of the regulator's sites.

Wikipedia is another realm researches say the FDA could work with to its advantage.The practical aspects of a relationship with the crowdsourced information site comes down to how important Wikipedia has become for health-related information, yet that information is not uniformly up-to-date: 23% of drug-related Wikipedia pages are updated within about two weeks of a new FDA warning, but 36% “remained unchanged more than a year later.”

This takes on a greater importance when considering just who is looking to Wiki for advice. A January social media assessment by the IMS Health Institute for Health Informatics noted that patients and doctors look to Wikipedia for information. They also found that rare disease patients make up the majority of patients who seek out health information on Wiki pages. Yet, the NEJM-published writers found that small-population disease pages were generally the ones that were not updated. An example: a Wiki page for the Hodgkin's lymphoma and systemic anaplastic large-cell lymphoma medication Adcetris which failed to mention a black box warning about a risk for progressive multifocal leukenocephalopathy two years after it was announced.

This is despite a corresponding uptick in Google searchers for the drug the week after the black box warning announcement and a 114% surge in Wikipedia page views for this drug's page, which indicates that traffic is not enough of a prompt for information to be updated. 

One solution researchers proposed is for the FDA to replicate the relationship it established with WebMD in 2008 with Wikipedia now. The WebMD agreement consists of two parts: the FDA sends public health announcements to WebMD's registered users and WebMD adds the new information to its web resources.

Researchers also play around with the idea of turning Wikipedia clean-up into coursework, as the University of California San Francisco Medical School did in 2013.

UCSF is not alone in its mission. IMS noted in its January report that the Medicine Translation task force has been working to improve the quality of Wikipedia's websites and help them get top billing in search results. The translation task force's Wiki page says the collaborative effort's goal is to “improve health care's most important topics in English followed by translation into as many other languages as possible.” The page was updated June 25.

 


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The Birth Control That Hobby Lobby Won’t Cover Is Leading To A Drop In Teen Births

The Birth Control That Hobby Lobby Won’t Cover Is Leading To A Drop In Teen Births | HealthMed News | Scoop.it
Thanks to a state program that gives IUDs to low-income women, Colorado's teen birth rate has dropped 40 percent.
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What is Digital Health? by Paul Sonnier

http://StoryofDigitalHealth.com This is an animated video definition of digital health that includes the underlying lexicon we've all become so familiar with...
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Wearables: A Solution Searching For Problems?

Wearables: A Solution Searching For Problems? | HealthMed News | Scoop.it

Wearables, devices used to sense data and process it into information, are generating quite the buzz in healthcare these days. But down the line, does that buzz come with a sting?

 

In Wearable Tech News, Tony Rizzo reports wearable technology spending predictions of $50 billion by 2018. He also reports on a ground-breaking, glucose-sensing contact lens for diabetics that will be a “true solution for a very real medical problem that affects hundreds of millions of people.”

 

By 2016, wearable wireless medical device sales will reach more than 100 million devices, according to a Cisco blog on the future of mobility in healthcare. The importance of these devices is that healthcare professionals can access critical data via mobile apps before, during and after a patient’s hospitalization, thus boosting the speed and accuracy of patient care, the blog says.

 

The Age of Wearables has a few caveats, though – note that a doctor “can,” “could,” “may” or “potentially” be able to monitor a patient from a wearable, as the products are still under development. One product cites unpublished research as support, and another uses a modality, thermography, that the National Cancer Institute states has no additional benefit for breast cancer screening.

 

The new, intense focus on wearables is the engagement of the general public, both the ill and the well, and how they collect and transmit patient information to physicians and EHRs. This presents two challenges:

 

1. Are physicians prepared for this tidal wave of data and information?

 

2. What is the true cost of the data surge versus its benefits?

 

Like all healthcare information technology, wearables have huge potential – married to massive challenges. 


more at :  http://hitconsultant.net/2014/07/11/wearables-a-solution-searching-for-problems/


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Mike Rucker's curator insight, July 20, 2014 1:38 AM

The answer to #1 from the doctors I have spoken with is a resounding no. The answer to #2 is a bit more complicated.

Maria Wolters's curator insight, August 25, 2014 10:50 AM

Interesting critique of wearables

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The Right Way To Subsidize Health Insurance - Forbes

The Right Way To Subsidize Health Insurance - Forbes | HealthMed News | Scoop.it
Forbes
The Right Way To Subsidize Health Insurance
Forbes
Although most of us think our health care system is predominantly a private system, government is heavily involved. Close to one in every two health care dollars is spent by government.
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Newest Health Insurance Customers Are Generally Happy - New York Times

Newest Health Insurance Customers Are Generally Happy - New York Times | HealthMed News | Scoop.it
Politico
Newest Health Insurance Customers Are Generally Happy
New York Times
The survey, from the Commonwealth Fund, a research group, came to similar conclusions as other surveys about the expansion of health insurance.
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Save Money on Health Care with Home Tests - Lifehacker

Save Money on Health Care with Home Tests - Lifehacker | HealthMed News | Scoop.it
If you're on a health care plan with a high deductible, saving money on health care is important. One way to reduce costs is to ask if you can do routine tests at home. You should absolutely follow your doctor's advice when it ...
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Did health insurance premiums jump 50 percent because of Obamacare? - Washington Post (blog)

Did health insurance premiums jump 50 percent because of Obamacare? - Washington Post (blog) | HealthMed News | Scoop.it
Did health insurance premiums jump 50 percent because of Obamacare?
Washington Post (blog)
“Lamar was proven right”. –voiceover of new campaign ad for Sen.
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Monitoring Health Outcomes of Assisted Reproductive Technology ...

Monitoring Health Outcomes of Assisted Reproductive Technology ... | HealthMed News | Scoop.it
Correspondence from The New England Journal of Medicine — Monitoring Health Outcomes of Assisted Reproductive Technology.
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Building A Culture of Health in America

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation calls on us to envision living in a nation where being healthy and staying healthy are an essential part of what it means to be American. A nation in which...
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Atul Gawande: How do we heal medicine?

http://www.ted.com Our medical systems are broken. Doctors are capable of extraordinary (and expensive) treatments, but they are losing their core focus: act...
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The Health Burden of Stress: What We Can Do About It | The Forum at HSPH

For many of us, stress is an omnipresent and frequently overwhelming factor of day-to-day life. As we begin to better understand its toll on our health, this Forum at the Harvard School of...
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