Participatory Mapping with Children
134 views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Trevor James Wideman
Scoop.it!

Union of the Baltic Cities Commission on Environment: How could children participate in regional planning?

Union of the Baltic Cities Commission on Environment: How could children participate in regional planning? | Participatory Mapping with Children | Scoop.it

Urban planning has been traditionally considered as a concern of architects, engineers and other experts working in the field of urban development.

Trevor James Wideman's insight:

This piece describes the implementation of participatory GIS in Sweden, and it asks some valuable questions about why children, as citizens, should be included in planning projects. What is the motivation for planners in a case like this? It's important that children are consulted, but the blog refers to this type of planning or "engagement" as "soft" in several instances. It also speaks about using children's citizen engagement to help make a region more "competitive" by ensuring that it is thriving. What do all these words mean? What is the real motivation behind engagement children's participation if it is stated to be "soft"?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trevor James Wideman
Scoop.it!

Children Becoming Social Actors: Using Visual Maps to Understand Children's Views of Environmental Change

This article discusses using visual maps, a participatory action research technique that captures spatial and cultural data, to represent the views of children on environmental issues.

Trevor James Wideman's insight:

This academic article talks about the use of participatory mapping with children in a conference setting. A few different mapping techniques are discussed here, but most importantly, the project demonstrated how mapping could be used with children from a variety of cultural backgrounds to visualize territories, journeys, and ideas about environmental change. The methods that the researchers use are quite complicated, though. Do you think there would be a way for them to get as much information using a less complex system? Is children's agency (or ability to perform independent action) being respected in this project, or are they being directed?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trevor James Wideman
Scoop.it!

OpenStreetMap: Mathare, Kenya

OpenStreetMap: Mathare, Kenya | Participatory Mapping with Children | Scoop.it

OpenStreetMap is a free wiki world map.

Trevor James Wideman's insight:

This map is an example of an effective mapping exercise. Hosted on OpenStreetMap, this is the result of the project described below in the post "Harnessing GIS mapping and social media to impove lives". It is also described in Lundine et.al. (2013). If you zoom in, you can see how detailed the map of Mathare (in grey) is compared to the areas around it. Do you think a project like this could help people better understand your own neighborhood?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trevor James Wideman
Scoop.it!

A Kid's Guide to Building Great Communities

Trevor James Wideman's insight:

This is a toolkit designed by the Canadian Institute of Planners that uses a series of mapping and planning workshops to engage children in conversations about the built environment. There are a variety of tools contained in this kit, and they are aimed at a kids of varying ages. Many of these workshops are very clever, and are probably very effective in generating conversations about urban space. Is there an easy way to translate 'conversations' like these into 'action'? In addition, do these engagements respect how children's views are different from adults?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trevor James Wideman
Scoop.it!

New USAID Policy and FHI 360’s Community YouthMapping Approach: Let Young People Drive Development

New USAID Policy and FHI 360’s Community YouthMapping Approach: Let Young People Drive Development | Participatory Mapping with Children | Scoop.it

The recently released Youth in Development policy from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) puts youth squarely on the map in international development

Trevor James Wideman's insight:

This short article talks about Youth Mapping in relation to the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID)'s recent policy document which states that youth need to be engaged in development processes. This project frames the need for youth engagement as one of empowerment, which is a noble goal, and one that is often achievable. Many projects (see Amsden & VanWynsberghe, 2005; Lundine et.al., 2013; more) show that when youth are empowered, then the mapping process becomes more successful and inclusive, because it respects the fact that children CAN be agents of change.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trevor James Wideman
Scoop.it!

Let's Teach Children Planning | Planetizen

Let's Teach Children Planning | Planetizen | Participatory Mapping with Children | Scoop.it

Planners often encounter ineffective public participation because of the fact that citizens often are not taught planning skills in school, says Michael A. Rodriguez.

Trevor James Wideman's insight:

This article is about teaching core planning concepts to school age children using methods such as participatory mapping and other design exercises (similar to those used by Hart, 1979). This author argues that planning education should be integral to every child's learning. Possibly the biggest concern here is in the use of the educational system to facilitate a planning agenda, because children are being 'taught' how a city should be instead of being 'asked' how they would like it to be. Is this true participation, or is it (as Purcell, 2009 notes) simply a reinterpretation of words to fit into existing frameworks? Can children's places be respected when their agency is not?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trevor James Wideman
Scoop.it!

Harnessing GIS mapping and social media to improve lives

Harnessing GIS mapping and social media to improve lives | Participatory Mapping with Children | Scoop.it
Harnessing GIS mapping and social media to improve lives Mapping the sanitation in situation in Mathare has been a process of continual learning. When we began the Map Mathare pilot project in Dece...
Trevor James Wideman's insight:

This blog post describes a participatory GIS project being done in Kenya. While this is not exclusively a youth-based project, youth are involved in a big way! Through the mapping of the Mathare slum, people are being trained and empowered, and the data that they are collecting shows both the assets and barriers to a healthy life in the community. Further information about this project is described in Lundine et.al. (2013), and for those interested, Berglund (2008) describes some of the challenges of working with children and youth using participatory GIS. How might a mapping project in Kenya be different from one in Canada? Also, are the skills that these kids are learning applicable to their future life after the project?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trevor James Wideman
Scoop.it!

mapped | Mapped

mapped | Mapped | Participatory Mapping with Children | Scoop.it

Youth wanted to map out where they go, what they use, and what they would recommend to other youth. Their plan is to update it again in the future.

Trevor James Wideman's insight:

Mapped! is a project developed by the City of Vancouver in conjunction with Sustainable CIties. Through a series of workshops, city youth participated in a mapping exercise where they identified assets in their neighbourhoods. These assets were then overlaid onto a Google Map so they could be accessed on the web. If you were a young person living in Vancouver, would you find this map useful? Did the city do a good job of listening to the needs of young citizens?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trevor James Wideman
Scoop.it!

Children's Experience of Place

Children's Experience of Place | Participatory Mapping with Children | Scoop.it
These maps are two selections from Children's Experience of Place (1979), a study conducted by Roger Hart of the roaming habits of children in a rural Vermont town. The first map demonstrates child...
Trevor James Wideman's insight:

Another early exploration into mapping with children was done by Roger Hart in his book 'Children's Experience of Place'. The maps shown in this blog post were created from participatory mapping exercises that Hart developed to research children in a small New England town. (Do you see any problems with adult researchers 're-drawing' the maps of children? What could possibly happen?) Unfortunately, this post doesn't give much in the way of information about Hart's project, but since there are very few websites dedicated to his work, its inclusion is warranted.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trevor James Wideman
Scoop.it!

Mental mapping - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The concept of a mental map may refer to a person's personal point-of-view perception of their own world. Although this kind of subject matter would seem most likely to be studied by fields in the social sciences, this particular subject is most often studied by modern day geographers in order to determine from the public such subjective qualities as personal preference and practical uses of geography like driving directions. Mass media also has a virtually direct effect on a person's mental map of the geographical world.[1] The perceived geographical dimensions of a foreign nation (relative to one's own nation) may often be heavily influenced by the amount of time and relative news coverage that the news media may spend covering news events from that foreign region. For instance, a person might perceive a small island to be nearly the size of a continent, merely based on the amount of news coverage that he or she is exposed to on a regular basis.[2]

In psychology, the term names the information maintained in the mind of an organism by means of which it may plan activities, select routes over previously traveled territories, etc. The rapid traversal of a familiar maze depends on this kind of mental map if scents or other markers laid down by the subject are eliminated before the maze is re-run.

Mental maps are an outcome of the field of behavioral geography. The imagined maps are considered one of the first studies that intersected geographical settings with human action.[3] The most prominent contribution and study of mental maps was in the writings of Kevin Lynch. In The Image of the City, Lynch used simple sketches of maps created from memory of an urban area to reveal five elements of the city; nodes, edges, districts, paths and landmarks.[4] Lynch claimed that “Most often our perception of the city is not sustained, but rather partial, fragmentary, mixed with other concerns. Nearly every sense is in operation, and the image is the composite of them all.” (Lynch, 1960, p 2.) The creation of a mental map relies on memory as opposed to being copied from a preexisting map or image. In The Image of the City, Lynch asks a participant to create a map as follows: “Make it just as if you were making a rapid description of the city to a stranger, covering all the main features. We don’t expect an accurate drawing- just a rough sketch.” (Lynch 1960, p 141) In the field of human geography mental maps have led to an emphasizing of social factors and the use of social methods versus quantitative or positivist methods.[5] Mental maps have often led to revelations regarding social conditions of a particular space or area. Haken and Portugali (2003) developed an information view, which argued that the face of the city is its information [6] . Bin Jiang (2012) argued that the image of the city (or mental map) arises out of the scaling of city artifacts and locations.[7] He addressed that why the image of city can be formed [8] , and he even suggested ways of computing the image of the city, or more precisely the kind of collective image of the city, using increasingly available geographic information such as Flickr and Twitter [9] .

Trevor James Wideman's insight:

This Wikipedia article is a great overview of Mental Mapping, one of the more popular uses of participatory mapping with children. Most importantly, it provides the reader with a good sense of the history of the method, and lots of links to other resources. Unfortunately, it doesn't talk much about how cities and governments might use mental mapping as an engagement tool, but it does review a few research projects that reach beyond Lynch's studies from the 1960's and '70's. It is difficult to find articles on Wikipedia that describe child-specific methods of participatory mapping: why do you think that might be?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trevor James Wideman
Scoop.it!

Maps: Tools for Adventure - GIS in Action

Maps: Tools for Adventure - GIS in Action | Participatory Mapping with Children | Scoop.it
Use maps to solve problems and help animals in this interactive game.
Trevor James Wideman's insight:

A lot of Participatory Mapping projects talk about using "GIS" to make maps. GIS stands for "Geographic Information System", and it is software that allows the user to map information using a computer.  This flash game from National Geographic Kids explains how a GIS works, and while it isn't an example of participatory mapping, it helps define a term that many people don't understand. So how might GIS be used to help planners and researchers display the results of a mapping project?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trevor James Wideman
Scoop.it!

uMAP the Community

uMAP the Community | Participatory Mapping with Children | Scoop.it

uMAP is a participatory community mapping process to facilitate social action and neighborhood change in a way that is based on young people’s everyday lives, perceptions, values, assets and needs.

Trevor James Wideman's insight:

uMAP the Community is a website that describes how participatory mapping can be used to empower youth and influence policy. This website (hosted by the University of Colorado) is a virtual 'clearinghouse' of information on the method and contains a lot of really useful links. The information provided here can help novice researchers develop their own mapping projects. However, it is not a very critical website. For example, are there any ways in which these methods might be used unscrupulously? Is the agency of children and youth being respected? Are they truly allowed to "have their say"?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trevor James Wideman
Scoop.it!

UrbanTick: Mental Maps - an Overview

UrbanTick: Mental Maps - an Overview | Participatory Mapping with Children | Scoop.it
Trevor James Wideman's insight:

This post gives a succinct overview of the beauty and simplicity of the Mental Map. Developed in the 1960's by Kevin Lynch, and subsequently used with children in his 1977 book 'Growing Up In CIties', this method provides a simple and effective way to obtain information from people about the places that mean the most to them in their communities. While this post does not focus specificlly on the use of the method with children, it does provide a rich history of the process and gives some useful links to other information. Two things this site lacks is information on the usefulness of this method in a cross-cultural context, and it fails to criticize the method's possible weaknesses. This blogger also appears to be an architect, so the use of the method is described with a architecture/design focus. How might a geographer use mental mapping in a different way?

more...
Ann Marie Murnaghan's comment, April 24, 2013 3:16 PM
Yes! What a rich history. Good context, and nice explanation of how to put it into action.
Scooped by Trevor James Wideman
Scoop.it!

The ethics of participatory digital mapping with communities

The ethics of participatory digital mapping with communities | Participatory Mapping with Children | Scoop.it

The absence of research and ethics protocols for some of these new kinds of data gathering and sharing is an issue of concern

Trevor James Wideman's insight:

This blog post is valuable because it discusses some of the critical ethical issues that are inherent in some participatory mapping schemes. Again, this post does not focus on youth specifically (and mostly discusses participatory GIS), but the issues raised are very pertinent to any mapping project. One of the most surprising things about the points raised in this post is that they have rarely been touched on in the academic literature, which makes this an area ripe for further exploration. Is there any other concerns that you can think of beyind the ones raised here?

more...
Ann Marie Murnaghan's comment, April 24, 2013 3:27 PM
This is an excellent list of problems which have been addressed in the critical GIS literature a bit, but does take a decidedly contemporary and social significance here.
Scooped by Trevor James Wideman
Scoop.it!

Child Researchers: Mapping Workshop Prototype

Trevor James Wideman's insight:

This is a video that shows a mapping exercise that was done as part of the "Child Researchers" project that happened in Copenhagen (shown below). The girls in this video are using their lived experience in the neighbourhood to communicate their opinions about the park and explain what they would like to see in a future park. Unfortunately the video doesn't provide much background information on the project, but it does show how mapping can be done. Some of the things the youth propose are a bit unrealistic: is that appropriate in a setting like this? Or should everything be able to be implemented?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trevor James Wideman
Scoop.it!

Ladder of Young People's Participation

Ladder of Young People's Participation | Participatory Mapping with Children | Scoop.it

Today, young people increasingly have more important positions, including that of decision-makers, planners, researchers, and more.

Trevor James Wideman's insight:

This blog post at the FreeChild Project describes Roger Hart's "Ladder of Children's Participation (1997) in simple terms, and gives short examples of the challenges that researchers face when involving children in community projects. The rubric set out on this website easily allows a project leader to evaluate "how participatory" their project is at a glance. Using this construct, evaluate some of the mapping projects that have been scooped on this website. On what rung of the ladder do they fall?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trevor James Wideman
Scoop.it!

Participatory Photo Mapping

Participatory Photo Mapping | Participatory Mapping with Children | Scoop.it

PPM is a tool for exploring the experience of health and place, and for communicating this experience to decision-makers

Trevor James Wideman's insight:

This website describes an enhanced method of particpatory mapping that integrates photography into the research design. The method is being used extensively in projects at the University of Wisconsin, and it is meant to add another layer of data to maps that may otherwise be difficult to interpret. A good description of this method's use in research is in Dennis et.al. (2009)'s research into health and place in Madison, Wisconsin. Is this a more effective way of allowing youth voices to be heard in research?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trevor James Wideman
Scoop.it!

Local Youth to Create Health Map of New Haven Neighborhoods

Local Youth to Create Health Map of New Haven Neighborhoods | Participatory Mapping with Children | Scoop.it

In an effort to battle chronic diseases in New Haven, teens and young adults of the city’s “Youth@Work” program will fan out in six neighborhoods this month, outfitted with hand–held computers and video cameras, to map what is healthy—and unhealthy—in the Elm City

Trevor James Wideman's insight:

This project, initiated by the School of Public Health at Yale University, encouraged youth to map all the health assets in their community using GPS and GIS technology. The idea behind this project was that kids have a better knowledge of their community than anyone else, so they should be the ones collecting the data. Unfortunately, there is no blog or other informal description of the project outcomes, but there is an academic article (Santilli et.al., 2011) that describes it. Do you think this was a successful project from the kids' point of view? Would you want to be involved in a mapping exercise like this?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trevor James Wideman
Scoop.it!

Youth Neighborhood Mapping Initiative: University of Memphis

Youth Neighborhood Mapping Initiative: University of Memphis | Participatory Mapping with Children | Scoop.it

The Youth Neighborhood Mapping Initiative is a project hosted by the Graduate Program in City & Regional Planning in conjunction with the City of Memphis’ Summer Youth Employment Program.

Trevor James Wideman's insight:

This is the homepage for a youth mapping research project initiated by the City Planning department at the University of Memphis. The results of this project are described in Santo et.al., 2010, but this website is an easily understood overview of the project. The website does not discuss many of the limitations to the project that are discussed in the academic paper (which emerged from the differeing perspectives of planners and youth), and it focuses almost entirely on the successes. As a positive, there are links to youth blogs and presentations relating to the project, which helps give a human face to the project. Why do you think that the website would gloss over the issues associated with participatory mapping?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trevor James Wideman
Scoop.it!

Face Your World, UrbanLab Slotervaart (2005-2011)

The Face Your World project, an initiative of the artist Jeanne van Heeswijk, offers children a collective learning environment in which they can learn how to investigate their living environment and can also adapt it.

Trevor James Wideman's insight:

The 'Face Your World' project (described in Lauwaert, 2009) is an example of a comprehensive planning initiative that used software and digital tools to facilitate the design of a park. The project was primarily aimed at children, but adults were consulted as well. The project website provides videos, timelines, and photos that describe every stage of the process, all the way to the eventual building of the park. While the website frames the project as a complete success, what were some of the problems that might have been encountered by the planners? Were everybody's voices heard?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trevor James Wideman
Scoop.it!

CHILD RESEARCHERS

CHILD RESEARCHERS | Participatory Mapping with Children | Scoop.it

WHAT IF CHILDREN’S WORLD VIEWS WERE THE STARTING POINT FOR CULTURAL DEVELOPMENT IN SANKT KJELDS?

Trevor James Wideman's insight:

"Child Researchers" is a component of the Living Copenhagen project, an critical art and design based intervention designed to question the renewal and revitalization of Copenhagen's 'Sankt Kjelds' neighbourhood. In this project, children were asked to particpate in a mapping workshop that provided an alternative development scheme for a local park. This is the first of a few examples that I have found that use children's engagement to rediesign green space, however, there are very few where kids reimagine entire neighbourhoods. Any thoughts on why that might be?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trevor James Wideman
Scoop.it!

Middlesex Filter Beds Photo Mapping Exercise

In December 2009, UCL students organised a photo mapping session with the kids from the E5 club in Hackney. Filmed by local resident and activist Teddy Sawye...
Trevor James Wideman's insight:

There are very few videos out there that show what a Participatory Mapping exercise with children actually looks like. This is a project led by university students that was meant to elicit children's opinions on a park in their London neighbourhood. It shows the process from the beginning (field trip) to the end (interviews with kids). It would be nice to know more about the background to this particular project, but it's an interesting video. After watching this video, who would you say is directing this process? Are these kids having fun?

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trevor James Wideman
Scoop.it!

GIS4Kids

GIS4Kids | Participatory Mapping with Children | Scoop.it

We are a group of kids who decided to get together and do something about spreading GIS awareness and its benefits. This site is the product (and also a tool) for our collaboration.

Trevor James Wideman's insight:

This site provides many good links to participatory GIS projects, and shows how GIS can be used to engage children and youth in participatory mapping projects. While there are a lot of good links here, the site leaves a lot of things left out. For example: Who is truly initiating these projects, since they are being done in public schools? Who benefits from the results? Are they 'by kids and for kids', or are they something else althogether? Despite the critiques, this is a good site to look at if you want more information about how GIS can be used in a classroom setting.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trevor James Wideman
Scoop.it!

Participatory Mapping: The Struggle for Land and Resources

Participatory Mapping: The Struggle for Land and Resources | Participatory Mapping with Children | Scoop.it

Through participatory mapping, indigenous, Afro-descendant and other marginalized people harness the power of cartography to better represent their material cultures and conceptions of space and place.

Trevor James Wideman's insight:

Participatory Mapping projects don't just happen in North America. In fact many times this technique is used in nations in the global south (sometimes called 'less-developed' countries). This site looks critically at the mapping process from a global perspective, while in contrast, projects like uMAP the Community (see link below) state that there are many benefits to mapping. Is it useful to be critical of the process, or is it more important accept participatory mapping results without question? What about the good feelings that people get from being involved and 'making a difference'?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trevor James Wideman
Scoop.it!

Guide: Participatory Mapping | National Co-ordinating Centre for Public Engagement

Participatory mapping is a group-based qualitative research method that gives participants freedom to shape discussion on a given topic with minimal intervention from researchers.

 

Trevor James Wideman's insight:

In the absence of a 'standard' definition of participatory mapping, this website (produced by the University of Bristol, UK) provides a clear description of how a mapping engagement might be done. It does not focus on engagement with any particular subset of the population, however, it introduces a very simple way of getting people to sit down and draw out the assets in their community. This 'pencil and paper' method is much different from others that use more advanced electronic tools and computers, however, it is much cheaper and simpler to reproduce in a community context. Since this website is just a simple overview, it doesn't provide much in-depth detail, however, it is useful as a stepping-stone to other resources. What would be more effective: engaging children or adults with maps?

more...
Ann Marie Murnaghan's comment, April 24, 2013 3:18 PM
This does seem like a nice how to. I am curious about this "engagement" idea, what does it really mean?