Parenting and Adolescence
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Rescooped by Andrea Coppinger from Exercising for Middle School
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Personal Fitness: Middle School Style - KWQC 6

Personal Fitness: Middle School Style - KWQC 6 | Parenting and Adolescence | Scoop.it
Personal Fitness: Middle School StyleKWQC 6The Dance Dance Revolution is becoming quite the hit in the physical education class at Bettendorf Middle School.

Via Collin Harrison
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Rescooped by Andrea Coppinger from eParenting and Parenting in the 21st Century
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'Crunch time' poll: Parents don't recognize kids are overweight

'Crunch time' poll: Parents don't recognize kids are overweight | Parenting and Adolescence | Scoop.it
Many American parents can't see that their kids are overweight , according to a poll released Monday.

Via Rehabmyheart, Peter Mellow
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Rescooped by Andrea Coppinger from Science News
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Good parenting is just a joke

Good parenting is just a joke | Parenting and Adolescence | Scoop.it
Parents who joke and pretend with their toddlers are giving their children a head start in terms of life skills.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Rescooped by Andrea Coppinger from eParenting and Parenting in the 21st Century
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Should kids compete, or just have fun?

Should kids compete, or just have fun? | Parenting and Adolescence | Scoop.it
KIDS' sport is too elitist and competitive, the Australian Sports Commission warns in a report that urges clubs to "make it fun" for poor performers.

Via Peter Mellow
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Rescooped by Andrea Coppinger from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
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Too Much Helicopter Parenting | NYTimes.com

Too Much Helicopter Parenting | NYTimes.com | Parenting and Adolescence | Scoop.it

 

AMERICAN parents are more involved in our children’s lives than ever: we schedule play dates, assist with homework and even choose college courses.

 

We know that all of this assistance has costs — depleted bank balances, constricted social lives — but we endure them happily, believing we are doing what is best for our children.

 

What if, however, the costs included harming our children?

 

That unsettling possibility is suggested by a paper published in February in the American Sociological Review. The study, led by the sociologist Laura T. Hamilton of the University of California, Merced, finds that the more money parents spend on their child’s college education, the worse grades the child earns.

 

A separate study, published the same month in the Journal of Child and Family Studies and led by the psychologist Holly H. Shiffrin at the University of Mary Washington, finds that the more parents are involved in schoolwork and selection of college majors — that is, the more helicopter parenting they do — the less satisfied college students feel with their lives.

 

Why would parents help produce these negative outcomes? It seems that certain forms of help can dilute recipients’ sense of accountability for their own success. The college student might think: If Mom and Dad are always around to solve my problems, why spend three straight nights in the library during finals rather than hanging out with my friends?

 

And there is no reason to believe that parents and children have cornered the market on these dynamics. Indeed, “helicopter helping” should yield similar consequences in virtually any relationship — with spouses, friends, co-workers — in which one person can help another.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Kat McCormick's comment, May 11, 2013 6:32 PM
Are parents living vicariously through their children?