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The Age of Borders

The Age of Borders | Paolo news | Scoop.it

"The creation date of (almost) every international border. Full-size image here."

Tags: infographic, worldwide, borders, political, historical.


Via Seth Dixon
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Nancy Watson's curator insight, February 23, 10:04 PM
Political Unit: History of  borders
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, February 27, 6:33 AM

Preliminary - Political Geography 

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The Two Koreas

The Two Koreas | Paolo news | Scoop.it

"While the Korean War of the early 1950s never formally ended, its aftermath has created starkly divergent worlds for those living on either side of the north-south divide. What follows is a look at life in the two Koreas; how such a night-and-day difference came to be; and where the crisis could go from here. Both governments claimed to be the legitimate rulers of the peninsula. Tensions between north and south gradually mounted, until finally, in June 1950, hundreds of thousands of North Korean troops stormed across the 38th parallel. The unsuspecting South Korean defenders were outgunned and outnumbered, and beat a hasty retreat southward."


Via Seth Dixon
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Katie Kershaw's curator insight, April 12, 1:07 PM
It’s hard to see that two groups of people who speak the same language and have the same ethnic backgrounds can live such strikingly different existences.  It seems that the only thing they still have in common is their language and ethnicities.  When I was scrolling through this story, there were a few pieces that really stood out to me.  The first was that the Korean War technically hasn’t been formally concluded, which means that attacks on each other aren’t actually that out of the realm of possibilities.  The next thing was that North Korea’s birth rate is higher than South Korea’s, yet the population of South Korea is two times larger.  This reflects that the life expectancy of South Koreans is significantly longer and that their resources are used more efficiently.  Other statistics that stood out related to GDP.  Up until 1980 both North and South Korea’s GDPs were growing at basically the same rate.  But from that point forward, South Korea’s grew dramatically and North Korea’s actually decreased.  This leads up to today where the GDP of South Korea is $1.934 trillion and North Korea’s is only $40 billion.  Seeing as they are basically working with the same resources, since they share a similar geographic location, in most situations their GDPs would be even a tiny bit similar.  However, the way the economies of both countries are operated have created such a difference in their GDPs.  The infrastructure of the two countries are also wildly different.  The map of the two countries at night show that South Korea uses a lot of electricity, so practically the entire country is lit up.  North Korea is so dark that if I didn’t know that people lived there, I would assume it was uninhabited by any humans.  The statistic regarding the percentages of roads paved vs unpaved in the two countries also shows the stark contrast between their infrastructure.  Only 3% of roads in North Korea are paved!  Whereas 92% of South Korea’s roads are paved.  The most unfortunate part of this whole situation is that there are millions of people who live in North Korea and must suffer with little hope of escaping while their South Korean neighbors generally enjoy a modernized life.  This story map shows that sharing a location does not really mean that two groups of people will live similar lives.
Douglas Vance's curator insight, April 20, 12:34 PM
This expertly created set of data points and maps clearly lay out the stark differences between North and South Korea. Also, it shows how both countries have resources the other needs and how cooperation or reunification can benefit everyone. However, this article shows how the dramatic differences between these two countries politically, economically, and socially make that highly unlikely. 
Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, April 26, 7:53 PM
(East Asia) This article explains the relationship between the Korean War and modern tensions. After WWII, the USSR occupied territory to the north of the 38th parallel and the US occupied the south. The governments of each half both claimed to be the true government of the whole peninsula until North Korea invaded the South, starting the Korean War. Communist China's entry forced UN and US troops into a stalemate at the parallel, eventually leading to an armistice establishing the DMZ, the most defended border in the world. In subsequent decades, North Koreans have dug tunnels under the DMZ to start a new invasion.

With Soviet help, Kim Il-sung created a military communist dictatorship in the north while the UN created a democracy in South Korea.

Despite common cultural heritage, there is a stark contrast between the two countries. The north has half the population, a higher birth rate, and a life expectancy 12 years lower, displaying the country's mismanagement. While the South has free press, free travel, and is the strongest economy in Asia, North Korea subjugates through punishment and is almost completely isolated. North Koreans have little access to food, electricity, and roads.

North Korea has developed a more aggressive policy in the last decade. Many successful missile tests have been made, including one fired over Japan into the Pacific Ocean last year. Even China, North Korea's one ally, has imposed sanctions on the country. Some think a peaceful solution is still available, while others watch the USA-NK Twitter war in anticipation.
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Maya civilization was much vaster than known, thousands of newly discovered structures reveal

Maya civilization was much vaster than known, thousands of newly discovered structures reveal | Paolo news | Scoop.it
“Scientists using high-tech, airplane-based lidar mapping tools have discovered tens of thousands of structures constructed by the Maya.”

Archaeologists have spent more than a century traipsing through the Guatemalan jungle, Indiana Jones-style, searching through dense vegetation to learn what they could about the Maya civilization. Scientists using high-tech, airplane-based lidar mapping tools have discovered tens of thousands of structures constructed by the Maya: defense works, houses, buildings, industrial-size agricultural fields, even new pyramids.

The lidar system fires rapid laser pulses at surfaces and measures how long it takes that light to return to sophisticated measuring equipment. Doing that over and over again lets scientists create a topographical map of sorts. Months of computer modeling allowed the researchers to virtually strip away half a million acres of jungle that has grown over the ruins. What's left is a surprisingly clear picture of how a 10th-century Maya would see the landscape.

Tags: lidar, spatial, remote sensing, geospatial, unit 1 GeoPrinciples, Guatemala, Middle America.


Via Seth Dixon
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Nicole Canova's curator insight, February 9, 8:55 PM
This article is not only about our expanding knowledge of Mayan civilization, although it is fascinating that experts are learning more about the cultural and historical geography of Guatemala.  It also highlights some problems that physical geography can sometimes pose to researchers, and the solutions that are becoming possible because of improving technology.  Archaeologists, rather than hiking through dense forests on the off chance of happening upon something recognizable as an ancient structure, can now use laser imaging to see past the overgrowth.
Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, February 14, 9:50 PM
This article is particularly interesting because it not only claims to change the way we think of the Mayans, but it also describes the methods used for unearthing the ruins of a civilization that has been lost. By using the Lidar system, archaeologists were able to discover a city with thousands of houses, pyramids and other buildings.
Matt Manish's curator insight, February 16, 1:57 PM
Archaeologists are using new high-tech, airplane-based lidar mapping tools to discover Mayan structures that have gone undetected for hundreds of years. This new method for archaeology has proved very successful as well, since tens of thousands of hidden Mayan structures have been detected using these new tools. This helps paint a different picture of what Mayan civilization was really like. For example, archaeologists now believe that the Mayan civilization may have had a population two to three times the size originally estimated and a much larger extension of land than previously thought. At the end of this article, what really made me think was how the Guatemalan jungle once hindered archaeologists from discovering Mayan structures, but now the jungle is seen as useful in preserving these structures over time, so they are not destroyed by people. It seems as though there is still much to learn about the Mayan civilization and their culture.
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Bistecche e frittura per quattro turisti giapponesi:1100 euro

Bistecche e frittura per quattro turisti giapponesi:1100 euro | Paolo news | Scoop.it
“ A proposito di accoglienza turistica: "Quattro bistecche, poi frittura mista di pesce, acqua e servizio: totale 1100 euro. E' i”
Via Giancarlo Dall'Ara
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Globalization, Trade, and Poverty

“What is globalization? Is globalization a good thing or not. Well, I have an answer that may not surprise you: It's complicated. This week, Jacob and Adriene will argue that globalization is, in aggregate, good. Free trade and globalization tend to provide an overall benefit, and raises average incomes across the globe. The downside is that it isn't good for every individual in the system. In some countries, manufacturing jobs move to places where labor costs are lower. And some countries that receive the influx of jobs aren't prepared to deal with it, from a regulatory standpoint. ”
Via Seth Dixon
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Marilyn Ramos Rios's curator insight, November 13, 2017 8:52 AM
Is globalization good thing or not?
Ivan Ius's curator insight, November 13, 2017 11:32 AM
Geographic Thinking Concepts: Pattern and Trends; Interrelationships; Geographic Perspective;
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, November 29, 2017 8:51 AM
Globalization, Trade, and Poverty
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Pie Chart of the World’s Most Spoken Languages

Pie Chart of the World’s Most Spoken Languages | Paolo news | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, November 29, 2017 8:50 AM
Pie Chart of the World’s Most Spoken Languages
Ziggi Ivan Santini's curator insight, November 30, 2017 4:00 AM

This infographic is a great way to visualize the dominant languages on Earth.

LLewe LLyn Cooper's curator insight, January 14, 10:07 PM
Languages all over the world
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Europe's Population Change (2001 to 2011)

Europe's Population Change (2001 to 2011) | Paolo news | Scoop.it
“The map provides a level of detail previously unavailable. It is the first ever to collect data published by all of Europe’s municipalities.”
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Katie Kershaw's curator insight, February 17, 5:08 PM
The population changes in Europe recently seem to be related to both low birth rates and an increase in migration.  Based on this map the most significant patterns seem to be that areas in south Eastern Europe are experiencing great population lows while France and Ireland’s populations are making significant gains.  This trend could most likely be explained by migration.  People in the regions of great population loss are most likely moving northwest in order to fill the many vacancies in Western Europe.  The reason that these vacancies exist is because the population of Europe overall is aging, so there are many spots open from retirees.  At the same time, the birth rates in most of Europe are so low it is causing the overall population of the continent to gradually decrease.  Without domestic workers to fill positions, companies in areas with low birth rates, like France and Spain, are forced to hire foreign employees.  The population loss in the eastern part of Europe seems to be due to migration.  Whereas on farther west, the regions with high population losses, such as Spain, Denmark, and southern Italy, can be explained by low birth rates.  The increased tension recently regarding immigration policies and Great Britain’s exit from the European Union can be explained by these trends.  As people with different ethnic backgrounds who do not speak the languages of the countries they migrate to continue to enter countries in large numbers, many Europeans begin to feel threatened.  This is why there are protests and the rise of political parties who run on anti-immigrant platforms.  
brielle blais's curator insight, March 24, 11:27 AM
Between 2001 and 2011 there has been serious demographic changes occurring all over Europe. The eastern section has seen a lot of suburbanization since the end of the Communist era and the early period of capitalism. There was once a lack of cash and depleating economy but now cities finally have the capital and chance to to build one family homes which allowed for the 2% growth. As for northwestern regions, the population has decreased as impoverished regions in the southwest draw in retiring or downsizing Europeans instead, as they want the sunshine and cheaper prices on things. This article shows how geography can truly shape the rise and fall of demographic in a country. 
Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, March 31, 1:34 PM
This article looks at Europe’ s changing population. Although many cities, like Prague and Bucharest have been experiencing a 1-2% population increase, other countries, such as countries in the east and northwest, have had a 1-2% decrease in population. Similarly, Turkey has a declining population as well. The author of this article argues that this steady decline is occurring because the citizens are leaving the rural countryside to find more job opportunities in the cities.
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The last globemakers

“Peter Bellerby is one of the last artisan globemakers on earth. But now, he's teaching an entirely new generation of artists the secrets of crafting entire worlds by hand.”
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 15, 2017 8:19 PM

Yes, these globes are precise archives filled with geospatial data and locational information–however, that pales in comparison to the artistic brilliance of the globes. These hand-crafted globes are truly works of art.  Marvel at the merger of mathematical precision and artistic design that makes a globe such as these a cartographic gem.  If anybody want to get me a Christmas present, you know that I love cartographic gifts.  FUTURE WATCHING: Here is the longer video of the Bellerby Globes being produced.     

 

Tags: cartography, visualization, mapping, artgeo-inspiration.

M Sullivan's curator insight, September 28, 2017 9:38 PM
Incredible hand-crafted globes and their stories.
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Announcing a New Feature to Build Students’ Geography Skills

Announcing a New Feature to Build Students’ Geography Skills | Paolo news | Scoop.it

"As the image above shows, The Times reports from all over the globe. We have journalists in more than 30 international news bureaus worldwide, and every day we publish news, feature stories, videos, slide shows and more from dozens of countries around the world. Our new 'Country of the Week' feature celebrates this abundance to help build students’ geography skills. A weekly interactive quiz will first introduce students to a country via a recent video or photograph, then ask them to find that place on a map. Next, the quiz will focus on the demographics and culture of the country. Finally, we’ll include links to recent reporting from that place in case they, or you, would like to go further. In 'Why Geography Matters,' Harm de Blij wrote that geography is 'a superb antidote to isolationism and provincialism,' and argued that 'the American public is the geographically most illiterate society of consequence on the planet, at a time when United States power can affect countries and peoples around the world.' This spatial illiteracy, geographers say, can leave citizens without a framework to think about foreign policy questions more substantively. 'The paucity of geographical knowledge means there is no check on misleading public representations about international matters,' said Alec Murphy, a professor of geography at the University of Oregon."

Tags: education, K12, geography education, geography matters.


Via Seth Dixon
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bintathletics's comment, September 11, 2017 1:46 AM
good
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Why geography matters now more than ever

Why geography matters now more than ever | Paolo news | Scoop.it

"Students need to know human geography; they need to understand the relationships that exist between cultures."


Via Seth Dixon
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LRC's curator insight, September 4, 2017 6:08 PM
Share your insight
Ivan Ius's curator insight, September 5, 2017 11:38 AM
Geographic concepts: Patterns & Trends; Interrelationships; Geographic Perpsective
Uart.com's curator insight, September 8, 2017 5:22 AM

Geography is more important than ever to explain and understand the art market in globalization and digitization turn.

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Accomable and EuTravel Project unite to make booking accessible transport easy

Accomable and EuTravel Project unite to make booking accessible transport easy | Paolo news | Scoop.it
“ LONDON – Accomable, the ‘Airbnb for disabled people’, is working with EU-funded project EuTravel to shape the future of accessible travel and enable anyone with a mobility issue to book door-to-door transport across the EU via a single platform with ease. Working with major GDS providers and transport companies, EuTravel Project will tap into existing mainstream IT travel reservation systems and sources of travel data, to enable people to find and book complete door-to-door transport routes via multiple modes of transport,”
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Crisi del Mediterraneo, overtourism e iper sovranità: le minacce del turismo (GuidaViaggi.it)

Crisi del Mediterraneo, overtourism e iper sovranità: le minacce del turismo (GuidaViaggi.it) | Paolo news | Scoop.it
“ Il Rapporto Unicredit sui fattori negativi dell’economia più resiliente. Con U4T la banca guadagna 13mila nuovi clienti”
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Nathalie Bondil : « Le musée doit produire du mieux-être ensemble »

Nathalie Bondil : « Le musée doit produire du mieux-être ensemble » | Paolo news | Scoop.it

Le musée comme lieu de contemplation, mais aussi de vie, d’apprentissage et de découverte… Depuis dix ans, la Française Nathalie Bondil, directrice du musée des Beaux-Arts de Montréal, mène avec ferveur une politique muséale innovante prônant une approche humaniste et vivante de l’art.


Via Aurelien Guillois
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Fanta C. Sangaré's curator insight, July 12, 2017 8:33 AM
Voici un article surprenant et inspirant. Il présente avec dynamisme une (r)évolution apportée dans le suivi des visiteurs du musée des beaux arts de Montréal. Soyez attentif aux coups de pouce judicieux proposés par son manager. Des idées à transposer de votre coté ?
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Are Americans trashing the English language?

"Are American's trashing the English language? The Economists language expert, Lane Greene, knows a thing or two about English. Lane is a fan of words, lots of words, and Lane is an American living in London. He's become accustomed to British English slang. But Lane often hears Britons complain that there are too many American words and expressions creeping into British English, these are called Americanisms. British writer Matthew Engel can't stand Americanisms being used in Britain and even wrote a book about it. But are Americanisms trashing British English?"


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 26, 2017 5:47 PM

This video touches on important cultural and spatial dynamics of the linguistic change impacting the world's current lingua franca...in other words, this is incredibly relevant to human geography. 

 

Tags: languagecultureworldwide, English, diffusion,

 colonialism.

Matt Manish's curator insight, March 8, 12:00 PM
I found this video very enjoyable to watch and I learned a lot more about how British people feel about the American language, especially in their own culture. I knew that American English and British English had some small differences with the spelling of some words and differences in some terms for the same object such as lift and elevator. But I didn't realize how some American phrases or "Americanisms" have crept into the British English language and are causing some English citizens to be upset about it.
In response to this information, I have to side with Lane Greene's opinion towards the end of this video. The fact that "Americanisms" are creeping into the British English language is the sign of a healthy and developing language. It means that one language that is being affected by another language because it has a global reach throughout the world. This is a positive thing that shouldn't be feared because as we can see from history, languages change over time and tend to never stay the same.
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Maya civilization was much vaster than known, thousands of newly discovered structures reveal

Maya civilization was much vaster than known, thousands of newly discovered structures reveal | Paolo news | Scoop.it
“Scientists using high-tech, airplane-based lidar mapping tools have discovered tens of thousands of structures constructed by the Maya.”

Archaeologists have spent more than a century traipsing through the Guatemalan jungle, Indiana Jones-style, searching through dense vegetation to learn what they could about the Maya civilization. Scientists using high-tech, airplane-based lidar mapping tools have discovered tens of thousands of structures constructed by the Maya: defense works, houses, buildings, industrial-size agricultural fields, even new pyramids.

The lidar system fires rapid laser pulses at surfaces and measures how long it takes that light to return to sophisticated measuring equipment. Doing that over and over again lets scientists create a topographical map of sorts. Months of computer modeling allowed the researchers to virtually strip away half a million acres of jungle that has grown over the ruins. What's left is a surprisingly clear picture of how a 10th-century Maya would see the landscape.

Tags: lidar, spatial, remote sensing, geospatial, unit 1 GeoPrinciples, Guatemala, Middle America.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Nicole Canova's curator insight, February 9, 8:55 PM
This article is not only about our expanding knowledge of Mayan civilization, although it is fascinating that experts are learning more about the cultural and historical geography of Guatemala.  It also highlights some problems that physical geography can sometimes pose to researchers, and the solutions that are becoming possible because of improving technology.  Archaeologists, rather than hiking through dense forests on the off chance of happening upon something recognizable as an ancient structure, can now use laser imaging to see past the overgrowth.
Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, February 14, 9:50 PM
This article is particularly interesting because it not only claims to change the way we think of the Mayans, but it also describes the methods used for unearthing the ruins of a civilization that has been lost. By using the Lidar system, archaeologists were able to discover a city with thousands of houses, pyramids and other buildings.
Matt Manish's curator insight, February 16, 1:57 PM
Archaeologists are using new high-tech, airplane-based lidar mapping tools to discover Mayan structures that have gone undetected for hundreds of years. This new method for archaeology has proved very successful as well, since tens of thousands of hidden Mayan structures have been detected using these new tools. This helps paint a different picture of what Mayan civilization was really like. For example, archaeologists now believe that the Mayan civilization may have had a population two to three times the size originally estimated and a much larger extension of land than previously thought. At the end of this article, what really made me think was how the Guatemalan jungle once hindered archaeologists from discovering Mayan structures, but now the jungle is seen as useful in preserving these structures over time, so they are not destroyed by people. It seems as though there is still much to learn about the Mayan civilization and their culture.
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Bistecche e frittura per quattro turisti giapponesi:1100 euro

Bistecche e frittura per quattro turisti giapponesi:1100 euro | Paolo news | Scoop.it
“ A proposito di accoglienza turistica: "Quattro bistecche, poi frittura mista di pesce, acqua e servizio: totale 1100 euro. E' i”
Via Giancarlo Dall'Ara
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Man Forgets Where He Parked, Finds Car 20 Years Later

Man Forgets Where He Parked, Finds Car 20 Years Later | Paolo news | Scoop.it
“ We've all been there (well, almost).”
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Ristoranti accoglienti

Ristoranti accoglienti | Paolo news | Scoop.it
“ Ripropongo di seguito un post di Fabrizio Todisco (Invasioni Digitali, e altro ancora), pubblicato su Facebook. I l tema è quell”
Via Giancarlo Dall'Ara
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Why Don’t We All Speak the Same Language?

Why Don’t We All Speak the Same Language? | Paolo news | Scoop.it
“There are 7,000 languages spoken on Earth. What are the costs — and benefits — of our modern-day Tower of Babel?”
Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 21, 2017 10:40 AM

These two podcasts are great mainstream looks at issues that filled with cultural geography content.  So many languages on Earth is clearly inefficient (the EU spends $1 billion per year on translation), and yet, linguistic diversity is such a rich part of humanity's cultural heritage.  Listen to the first episode, Why Don't We All Speak the Same Language? as well as the follow-up episode, What Would Be the Best Universal Language?

 

Tags: languagecultureworldwide, English, regions, diffusiontechnology.

Andrew Kahn's curator insight, November 4, 2017 8:13 PM
Culture speaks louder than words
 
Laurie Ruggiero's curator insight, May 29, 4:48 PM
Unit 3
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'I feel like a second-class citizen': readers on navigating cities with a disability

'I feel like a second-class citizen': readers on navigating cities with a disability | Paolo news | Scoop.it
“ We asked readers with a disability to share their experiences – good and bad. Their responses show the many ways people can be shut out of their communities”
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Il volto gratuito della Sardegna

Il volto gratuito della Sardegna | Paolo news | Scoop.it

Vendere non voleva, ma regalare si!


Via Giancarlo Dall'Ara
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The American West, 150 Years Ago

The American West, 150 Years Ago | Paolo news | Scoop.it
“In the 1860s and 70s, photographer Timothy O'Sullivan created some of the best-known images in American History. After covering the U.S. Civil War, (many of his photos appear in this earlier series), O'Sullivan joined a number of expeditions organized by the federal government to help document the new frontiers in the American West. The teams were composed of soldiers, scientists, artists, and photographers, and tasked with discovering the best ways to take advantage of the region's untapped natural resources. O'Sullivan brought an amazing eye and work ethic, composing photographs that evoked the vastness of the West. He also documented the Native American population as well as the pioneers who were already altering the landscape. Above all, O'Sullivan captured -- for the first time on film -- the natural beauty of the American West in a way that would later influence Ansel Adams and thousands more photographers to come.”

Tags: images, art, landscape, tourism, historical, USA.


Via Seth Dixon
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Gestire i tempi di attesa

Gestire i tempi di attesa | Paolo news | Scoop.it
“ Uno degli aspetti dell'accoglienza che francamente mi delude quando, a volte, entro in un negozio, o in un bar, è la disattenzion”
Via Giancarlo Dall'Ara
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Whose Heritage? Public Symbols of the Confederacy

Whose Heritage? Public Symbols of the Confederacy | Paolo news | Scoop.it

"In [recent years], the South’s 150-year reverence for the Confederacy was shaken. Public officials responded to the national mourning and outcry by removing prominent public displays of its most recognizable symbol [the flag]. It became a moment of deep reflection for a region where the Confederate flag is viewed by many white Southerners as an emblem of their heritage and regional pride despite its association with slavery, Jim Crow and the violent resistance to the civil rights movement in the 1950s and 1960s."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 16, 2017 12:55 PM

Just a few more links that I've added to the article, Cultural Meaning in Moving Monuments.  Right now, many people are calling for the removal of all memorials that honor the Confederacy and the call for the removal of all Confederate monuments is in full swing.  

 

Tags: monuments, the South, architectureracecultural norms, landscape.

Treathyl Fox's comment, August 17, 2017 10:22 AM
Nobody in Iraq is debating the pulling down of the statue of Saddam Hussein. It's about what his statue "represented" to a people. It's the same thing with the Confederate symbols. America has an “80%” minority population. (The 80% is a joke.) From the Native Americans to anybody else in that percentage, you won't hear any of them arguing to defend the Confederacy as their “history” and “heritage”. Get real!
Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 2017 8:57 PM

Just a few more links that I've added to the article, Cultural Meaning in Moving Monuments.  Right now, many people are calling for the removal of all memorials that honor the Confederacy and the call for the removal of all Confederate monuments is in full swing.  

 

Tags: monuments, the South, architectureracecultural norms, landscape.

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A Remote Paradise Island Is Now a Plastic Junkyard

A Remote Paradise Island Is Now a Plastic Junkyard | Paolo news | Scoop.it
“Henderson Island is isolated and uninhabited—but its beaches are still covered in garbage. ”

Henderson Island (article or podcast) is about the most remote place you can visit without leaving the planet. It sits squarely in the middle of the South Pacific, 3,500 miles from New Zealand in one direction and another 3,500 miles from South America in the other. Henderson should be pristine. It is uninhabited. Tourists don’t go there. There’s no one around to drop any litter. The whole place was declared a World Heritage Site by the United Nations in 1988. The nearest settlement is 71 miles away, and has just 40 people on it. And yet, seafaring plastic has turned it into yet another of humanity’s scrapheaps.

Tags: pollution, Oceania, water, environment, sustainability, consumption.


Via Seth Dixon
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Tiffany Cooper's curator insight, August 22, 2017 3:17 PM

#GEO130

M Sullivan's curator insight, November 29, 2017 11:23 PM
Useful for the IDU topic of plastic single use water bottles.
Katie Kershaw's curator insight, April 26, 1:49 PM
If I had looked at this picture without the context, I would think it was somewhere where people had stayed for a while and then left the place trashed with their own garbage.  In reality,  this is an island that is 3500 miles away from the nearest major settlement and doesn’t have any human inhabitants.  This really exemplifies that even though plastic waste may not be in one’s backyard, it never truly goes away.  Plastic is a material that cannot be broken down, so when it is dumped it just moves around until it hits land.  The article pointed out that plastic is incredibly difficult to clean up, particularly on places like Henderson Island.  When it floats in the ocean for a long time, it becomes brittle and breaks into very small fragments.  Those small fragments then mix with the sand and get buried, making it impossible to get rid of.  Another fact about this island that was shocking is that 3,750 pieces of litter wash up everyday, which is 100,000 times than other islands.  Henderson Island is not suitable for humans to live on, as there is no freshwater, frequent storms, and incredibly sharp terrain.  It is interesting that an island that keeps humans away can’t defend itself against plastic.  The reach of humans extends far beyond what they imagine and even uninhabitable land is infested with human waste.  No matter how remote a place is, it will still be effected by people.