Paleoindians and Megafauna Extinction
11 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Ashley Holliday
Scoop.it!

Paleo-Indian Period - National Institute of Culture and History

Paleo-Indian Period - National Institute of Culture and History | Paleoindians and Megafauna Extinction | Scoop.it
Belize's National Institute of Culture and History
Ashley Holliday's insight:

In this article written and published by Institute of Archaeology at the National Institute of Culture and History Belize, attributes the reason for early human colonization of North America on Paleo-Indian hunting patterns of megafauna mammals. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashley Holliday
Scoop.it!

The Clovis Point and the Discovery of America’s First Culture

The Clovis Point and the Discovery of America’s First Culture | Paleoindians and Megafauna Extinction | Scoop.it
Beautifully crafted blades point to the continent’s earliest communities
Ashley Holliday's insight:

This article written by Charles C. Mann and published by the Smithonian Magazine, highlights the culture of paleoindians, or the Clovis people. It is stated that there is evidence of interaction between the Clovis and megafauna, traced through archaeological findings of Clovis points throughout North America. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashley Holliday
Scoop.it!

Determinants of loss of mammal species during the Late Quaternary ‘megafauna’ extinctions: life history and ecology, but not body size

Determinants of loss of mammal species during the Late Quaternary ‘megafauna’ extinctions: life history and ecology, but not body size | Paleoindians and Megafauna Extinction | Scoop.it
Ashley Holliday's insight:

This artical by C. N. Johnson (School of Tropical Biology, James Cook University) and published by the Royal Society Publishing, focuses of the cause of megafauna extinction and the extent to which humans were involved, through biological traits of now extinct species in comparison with those of survivors. The conclusion being that the analysis is consistent with extinctions being due to human interaction.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashley Holliday
Scoop.it!

Science Magazine: Assessing the Causes of Late Pleistocene Extinctions on the Continents

Ashley Holliday's insight:

In this article written by Anthony D. Barnosky, Paul L. Koch, Robert S. Feranec, Scott L. Wing, and Alan B. Shabel published by Science Magazine, it is stated that there was more than one cause for megafauna extinction. It is suggested that cause of extinction varied from continent to continent; causation in America being a combination of both climate change and human impact.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashley Holliday
Scoop.it!

Explaining the Pleistocene megafaunal extinctions: Models, chronologies, and assumptions

Explaining the Pleistocene megafaunal extinctions: Models, chronologies, and assumptions | Paleoindians and Megafauna Extinction | Scoop.it
Ashley Holliday's insight:

In this article by Barry W. Brook and David M. J. S. Bowman (both  from the Key Centre for Tropical Wildlife Management, Northern Territory University), and published by PNAS in November 2002, says that in America, based on mathematic models, the extinction of megafauna mammals was due to interaction with humans, as they had in fact, survived climate change before without the presence of humans. Although the article mainly highlights extinction in New Zealand, there are inferences and comparisons to that which took place in America. 

 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashley Holliday
Scoop.it!

Clovis Hunting and Large Mammal Extinction: A Critical Review of the Evidence

Clovis Hunting and Large Mammal Extinction: A Critical Review of the Evidence | Paleoindians and Megafauna Extinction | Scoop.it
Ashley Holliday's insight:

This is a link to a section of "Journal of World Prehistory, Vol. 16, No. 4, December 2002", written by Donald K. Grayson and David J. Meltzer, and published by Plenum Publishing Coorperation in 2002.  It focuses on whether the Clovis people eventually led to megafauna mammal extinction, the conclusion being that the Clovis people had little to do with the extinction of the megafauna mammals. 

more...
No comment yet.