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citizens use digital technologies to make their cities more liveable and lively; they feel they belong to the city and that the city belongs to them; they engage in communally shared issues and have the power to act.
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Cronoshare.com: trabaja por horas y gana dinero extra

Cronoshare.com: trabaja por horas y gana dinero extra | P2P Culture | Scoop.it
Cronoshare te permite ganar un dinero extra haciendo tareas, recados y pequeños servicios a otras personas. Y si no tienes tiempo para hacer tus recados o necesitas algún servicio... ¡que otros los hagan por ti!
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Acceder antes que poseer

Acceder antes que poseer | P2P Culture | Scoop.it
¿Quién dijo que cooperar no sale rentable? Préstamos de bicicletas, de trayectos en vehículo, de viviendas... Propuestas de éxito en tiempos de crisis
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Michel Bauwens, P2P Alternative Foundation - Economía distribuida y P2P (Parte 1)

Martes Innobasque 11 junio El P2P (peer to peer) es un cambio de paradigma en la manera de organizarnos, compartir, producir e interactuar. Hablamos de un nu...
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Shareable: Rumors of the Death of Ownership in the Sharing Economy Have Been Greatly Exaggerated

Shareable: Rumors of the Death of Ownership in the Sharing Economy Have Been Greatly Exaggerated | P2P Culture | Scoop.it
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The Boom of Commons-Based Peer Production

The Boom of Commons-Based Peer Production | P2P Culture | Scoop.it

In 1991, an undergraduate Finnish computer science student, Linus Torvalds, had a surprising idea: he began to write a new operating system on his PC. His initial goal was to be able to try some things that weren’t possible with the operating systems then available to him. After several months of tinkering, Torvalds noted that he had developed a system that could be useful for others, too. He announced his work on the Internet and asked for feedback about features that people would like to see. Some weeks later, he put the software online. Now anybody could download and use his code. It was also possible to adapt it to better fit your needs, if you knew how to program.

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Vancouver Car Spaces Transforming into People Places

Vancouver Car Spaces Transforming into People Places | P2P Culture | Scoop.it

[Looking for Something to Do or Somewhere to Be During these Summer Weekends? Regular Spacing Contributor - Urban Designer Brendan Hurley looks at the new public spaces and street festivals in Vancouver, but reveals a summer full of fun in to be had town. Events listed below!]

Vancouver is changing, one street at a time. The City has made some specific efforts to foster pedestrian activity and a walking culture that is more than the ordinary stroll. One-time and regular events have been burgeoning through Vancouver’s Streets and these walkabouts have revealed how shifting how we use streets in the City help to markedly change how the city itself functions and is experienced.

The successful events that have happened and are still happening during these not so lazy days of summer show that a demand for using public space and civic activity on the ground is strong in Vancouver. Yet, that demand warrants the pursuit of policies now that would have seemed like distant pipe dreams without such examples.

Viva Vancouver and Transport 2040:

Vancouver’s Transportation 2040 Draft Plan has outlined some of the ways the extension of activities can be made by the City into streets, rights of way, and parking areas to make pedestrian and other activities thrive in what is commonly considered sacred space for cars. Some of its proposals point directly to pedestrian infrastructure improvement, but some include a push towards new public spaces including a “Pavement to Plazas” program that will focus on shifting the use of key parking stalls in high traffic areas that can be reutilized and reprogrammed into public open spaces. [An early effort is Parralel Park off Main St. on 14th Avenue.] There is also a striking support for permitting for events that repurpose streets for festivals and other events – both reoccurring and singular.

One of the successful first forays into the development of this pedestrian culture is the VIVA Vancouver Project. Viva Vancouver working off of the success of Olympic festival events and a few pilot projects has greatly expanded this summer. As part of Viva Vancouver there have been a number of street closures that have vastly increased pedestrian space and activity in the downtown core over the summer. Granville Street has been blocked to even bus traffic on the weekends as seating, buskers and most importantly people fill into the street. Some of the this programs most amazing improvements to public space, however, have been showing up on Robson Street.

#1 - Robson Street Parklet [Urban Pasture]:

The decking, vegetation, and wooden bench add space to walk, socialize, and eat. [Photo John Paul Catungal]
In the last few weeks there has been a pleasant surprise outside the door of Café Crêpe on Robson Street: An extension of the sidewalk build of wood decking has been placed in the equivalent of two on-street parking stalls that includes benches and planters.

A little primer:
Robson Street was originally surveyed as just another residential street of the West End at a 66 foot width. With the early inclusion of a streetcar –now trolley-bus– the street drew retail and pedestrian traffic that is now often tracked as some of the most consistently busy in the Metro Vancouver region. In the late ‘70s a policy to set back new developments was imposed on the street to ensure that the street would act with an 80 foot right-of-way – consistent with standard retail high-street rights-of-way. Problems in the pedestrian space of Robson arise where older buildings, like the Café Crêpe, among others, jut into that wider right-of-way and pinch sidewalk widths below the ability to service pedestrian loads.

The parklet shows the potential to use parking spaces to accomodate far more street users than the two cars that the space would have otherwise been used for. Beyond opening up pedestrian movement space, the wooden structure is lined with an angular bench with a variety of seating opportunities and a planter box edge that separates the spot from the travel lane beside it. This mix of smooth wood and vegetation makes for a comfortable place to sit and grab a bite, something that helps the Café especially as they have a front facing takeaway window that exacerbates crowding on this section of an already busy street.

#2 - Robson Square Summertime Plaza:

Tables and chairs in Robson Square are activating the space and providing a day and night time program. [Photo: Brendan Hurley]

A pedestrianized Robson Square has been the goal of many a planner for decades. An early attempt more than 30 years ago caused traffic chaos. At that time the Cambie Street Bridge exited directly onto Robson and the street acted as a major arterial – its not hard to imagine the pandemonium at Robson and Howe if you added the traffic that now goes up Smithe to the mix. Ever since the engineering department of the City has been wary of shutting down Robson to through-traffic. However, whether through constant badgering or because of the success of the space as an open plaza during the Olympics, the pedestrianization of Robson Square is getting an extended chance to thrive this summer.

Last summer seating was provided as part of the Viva Vancouver program by an artificial lawn installation. This year a more quaint, yet powerful system has been put in place... tables and chairs. Large umbrellas have been placed in the travel lanes that divide the centrally located public space, and under them are a large number of foldable and durable metal chairs and tables. They are strikingly similar to sets used in Paris and NYC's Bryant Park.

#3 - Granville Street’s Great White Way

Some of the City's first attempts at opening up a redesigned Granville Street happened during the 2010 Olympics festivities. [Image: City of Vancouver]
The PWL redesignof Granville Street was on of the first big forays into this brave new world of urbane mixing of uses and priorities for Vancouver’s streets. The strip long known for its neon and lights gained a powerful unifying design element with the installation of vertical lit lamp posts. The effect at night is a ribbon of light that lives up to the much older nickname of the “Great White Way”. The design allows for vehicular space to be shifted back and forth into the streets. Parking lanes can easily be appropriated for sidewalk space deeper in the central business and club districts are shut off to traffic – even busses – on weekend evenings.
This action of blocking vehicular traffic along one of Vancouver’s most important retail streets has opened up possibilities for summer time activities that include performances and events.

On Saturday August 4th the second annual Veg Fest is filling up the Block of Granville between Robson and Georgia to present some of the City’s best vegetarian and vegan foodcarts and vendors.

#4 - The Amazing Grilled Cheese Giveaway

The Amazing Grilled Cheese Giveaway shut down a residential street and drew in passers by on bikes and foot. [Photo: Brendan Hurley]
On Saturday July 28th[Sorry Cheese fans you’ll have to wait until this time next year] Toby Amrit and Joni McKervey, amongst others, organized a small street festival for passers by in front of their home in Strathcona. In what has now become an annual event, the two along with neighbours, friends and random volunteers closed off the Union Bikeway and set up a grilled cheese party for any and all who chose to take part.
Using funds including a grant from the Vancouver Foundation along with a strong sense of the power of civic altruism, this festival showed what happens when people take over their street with a mind to making a people place and simple fun. A grill station and tent was matched with party music and cheesy sandwich art and signage.

While planned and seemingly approved, the event had a feeling of random happenstance and community mindedness that has often felt missing from the larger public events and festivals in the city. It was very bohemian, with bikes strewn and piled on the pavement and smiling faces. Some inspired to add other foods and drinks to the festivities others just surprised that to be offered a comfort food treat with no strings attached.

I can’t wait to see what happens next year. This event also provides optimism for what can be achieved if there is a stronger and more consistent policy to support community events, especially when it takes up the street for this kind of civically minded block party.

I can’t wait to see what happens next year. [To watch highlights of this years festivities check out the Grilled Cheese TV that was set up.]

#5 - East Van's Food Cart Festival:

The Food Cart Fest in East Van was packed with people hungry for a taste of street food. [Photo: Lenore Newman]

On a more organized and commercially minded level of vehicle space appropriation the East Van Food Cart Fest is taking over the parking lot beside the Waldorf Hotel. The food cart pilot program has been in effect downtown changing the street food fare of this city to a new level beyond mere hot dogs - previously enforced as the only approvable street food by the Vancouver-Richmond Health Authority… and the City. But this festival strikes a chord and evokes the presence of the Food Pods in our Cascadian sister to the South – Portland, OR.

Dozens of food trucks and carts took over and lined the Waldorf’s parking lot with the bustling activity of expectant foodies in lines of hungry, yet happy revelers. Unlike the Portland prototype this pod faces inwards containing those partaking the fare – from the papusas to the perogies – inside the parking lot just off of Hastings. Tables and DJ booths were set up along with a legal bar cordoned off of the building edge of the Waldorf.

Using festival exemptions the Food Cart Fest is showing some of the best that the City has given coveted licenses to, along with some that seem to still be waiting on approval [fingers crossed]. The massive popularity of Sunday’s event, especially in such an out of the way location shows that a food pod might be a great weekend or seasonal addition to a surface parking lot somewhere else in the City, especially somewhere more central and active.

Food Cart Fest at the Waldorf is continuing every Sunday until Sept 2nd.

#6 - Livable Laneways:

Filling the T-Lane behind Main & Broadway. [Image: Livable Laneways Vancouver
Usually when planners talk about pedestrianizing streets we are referring to retail high streets or high traffic areas. The livable lane project that has been part of Viva Vancouver has been taking the concept of streets for people to a much smaller scale. The Livable Lanes project in the lane west of Main between Broadway and 8th Avenue is showing what potential the smaller rights of way that permeate our city can reach. There have been a number of festivals in the city over the years that have focused on programming a lane, but there have been few that
This Saturday August 4th the Mount Pleasant BIA is presenting the Smoking Sausage BBQ Competition as part of the Livable Laneways events. The Cook-Off will be happening between 5pm and 9pm.

[Also to look out for this August Long Weekend]

#7 - Powell Street Festival:

Vancouver’s annual Japanese community event returns to the Oppenheimer Park this year. With food, dancing, and celebration of Japanese Canadian culture in Vancouver. The side streets are take over for food and festivities while the park itself acts as the main stage and core of the action.

Drop in on the festivities on Saturday August 4th and Sunday the 5th.

#8 - Celebration of Light:

Vancouver’s annual fireworks competition, these years sponsored by Honda, is underway, and Saturday August 4th is the last night. The atmosphere down at the end of Davie and Denman Streets is becoming more and more of a carnival. By showtime around 10pm the streets are packed with revelers and are locked down to cars. This year even more than before there has been an effort by organizers to focus on getting people of their cars to enjoy the night. The West End has been all but blocked off to incoming traffic, and connections to transit have been beefed up.

By the end of the night the massive crowds flow and filter through the streets and lanes of these seaside neighbourhoods. It’s interesting to think about the growth and changes that have happened with this festival since decades past when people gathered around English Bay to watch fireworks.

#9 - Pride Parade:

Everyone loves a parade, but it is something that isn’t as common of a sight in Vancouver. Pride is different, as one of the city’s most popular parades and street festivals, it fills the streets of Downtown with people and activity, with a flare of Carnivale. The Sunday celebration of GBLT culture [August 5th from noon] in the city runs along Robson, Denman, and Beach ending at Sunset beach for the usual party. The other party is the street festival that fills the Davie Village with even more life. Previous years have even seen temporary bars and dance halls set up in the travel way. Some critique that it has become much less of a statement than a corporate event, but the power of this festival and parade and the party atmosphere that is at its core has provided lessons for many of the other events that have since been following in the steps of celebrating life in the city by dancing in the streets.

•••

Brendan Hurley is a local urban designer who focuses on planning for adaptive neighbourhood change. His recent work has been internationally focused, but is strongly rooted in his native Vancouver. Living and working out of the heart of downtown, he remains keenly focused on the region’s development and history. Brendan is acting as Assistant Editor of Spacing Vancouver, but also consults as director of the UrbanCondition design collective.

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Fold My Ride: The Bike That Could Change Transit - Business - GOOD

Fold My Ride: The Bike That Could Change Transit - Business - GOOD | P2P Culture | Scoop.it
The Bike Nation series is brought to you in partnership with CLIF Bar.

This spring, bike sharing came to South by Southwest for the first time in the festival's history—something of a late arrival, given the crowd that assembles in Austin every year. When I stopped by to check it out, I was surprised to find not the usual cruisers-for-rent but instead a collection of foldable bikes.

Folding bikes are the black sheep of the bike community, neither respected by hard-core cyclists nor frequently used by the average citizen. But a new global company called Tern Bikes is out to change that perception—and, in the process, change transit.

“We just said, look, a folding bike doesn’t have to look and ride like a contraption,” says Steve Boyd, the company’s general manager in North America. Tern Bikes launched publicly last year after several employees of Dahon bicycles, including the founder’s son, departed to form a new company to create high-quality folding bikes.

The most reliable market for folding bikes is people with “acute needs”—they’ve got an RV or a boat and want to keep a bike on it, they live in small walk-up apartments or face other space constraints. These people will find Tern bikes on their own. Boyd and his colleagues, though, want to expand the market.

“We’re broadening it by calling it urban transportation,” Boyd says. “More and more people are moving into these re-urbanization movements in places like downtown L.A. where no one lived five years ago.”

Tern’s pitch is the first-mile, last-mile argument: Bikes can effectively extend the useful range of public transit by providing an easy way to get to and from stops. Folding bikes are even more effective in this role because of their compact size; they also encourage bike commuting in the event of inclement weather, since they can be easily carried not just on public transit, but in any car.

Sixty four percent of trips in the U.S. are two miles or less, Boyd says, and if people would bike just ten or twenty percent, it would have an incredibly beneficial effect.

“A bike, in general, can fix everything,” Boyd says. “The world’s problems, much of them revolve around congestion, pollution and obesity, and the bicycle is the perfect solution to all those problems, and our [folding] bikes are the most useful of all bicycles.”

The company didn't want to compromise on aesthetics or ride. Tern’s bikes have won several design awards; its engineers designed special forged hinges for the bike’s two folding joints that keep the frame stable while riding but open smoothly when you fold it. Pedaling around Austin, the bike rides just like a Giant or a Trek; Boyd says you couldn’t tell the difference between his bikes and a regular bike if you were riding blindfolded—not that he recommends it.

Boyd says Tern is on pace to sell 100,000 bikes each year, ranging from its best seller, the utilitarian Link D8, at $600, to “the Ultimate” Eclipse S11i at $2,300. Most are sold in Germany and the Netherlands, where public transit and bike enthusiasm create a perfect synergy for Tern. Each year, Boyd says, Germans purchase as many specialty bikes as Americans.

While the bikes are made in Taiwan, the company’s 80 employees are scattered around the globe. In Austin, Smith talks happily about the city’s robust cycling culture and community, Boyd, the vice president of the board of the Los Angeles County Bicycle Coalition, says that it will take a while for Los Angeles and other American cities to catch up to Austin and Portland, much less Amsterdam or Berlin.  

The big challenge is the distance of commute; in Los Angeles, Boyd says, the average commute is nearly 42 miles, far above the national average of 12. The answer is a more expansive transportation system, and “any infrastructure takes time.” Still, Boyd points to commitments from L.A.’s city government and others across the country as evidence that both transit and cycling infrastructure are beginning to advance hand-in-hand.

“People are riding their bikes a whole heck of a lot more for everyday transportation,” Boyd says. It's a chance to sell some bikes—and to solve some problems. 

Get out of your car and ride your bike in the 2 Mile Challenge. CLIF Bar will donate $1 for every trip you log to bike nonprofits, up to $100,000.

Photo courtesy Tern Bikes.

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Conscious Commuter: Electric Bike Offers a Path to Conscious Commuting

Conscious Commuter: Electric Bike Offers a Path to Conscious Commuting | P2P Culture | Scoop.it

WE'RE helping shape the future of urban mobility by solving the first and last mile commute problem.

Our lightweight, compact, intuitively folding electric bike empowers users to get to the nearest bus stop or rail station, and, after commuting,to get to their office -- grease free and without a sweat.

But this is just part of a seamless transportation system that we'll integrate with leading go-to-market partners in the auto, bus and rail industries.

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« Géographie subjective » : conception collaborative de cartes collectives

« Géographie subjective » : conception collaborative de cartes collectives | P2P Culture | Scoop.it
D'aucuns diront que l'expression “carte subjective” relève du pléonasme. Oui !

Via Bernard BRUNET, paradoxcity
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Cien Pies: un proyecto para recuperar el hábito de ir al colegio andando

Cien Pies: un proyecto para recuperar el hábito de ir al colegio andando | P2P Culture | Scoop.it
En el momento en que las agujas marcan las 9.00 de la mañana y las 5.00 de la tarde se produce el horror. Los coches estrangulan las salidas de los colegios de Godella (Valencia). Los niños salen y cada uno monta en un vehículo que lo llevará a casa.
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Influencia - Tendances - Le citoyen crowdsource

Influencia - Tendances - Le citoyen crowdsource | P2P Culture | Scoop.it
Le crowdsourcing s’est imposé ces dernières années comme une tendance forte.
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Making Sense of the City

Making Sense of the City | P2P Culture | Scoop.it
Just about every writer in this installment makes it clear: each city is unique. But that doesn't settle our craving to look for what makes a city a city.
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TaskRabbit | Your tasks, done.

TaskRabbit | Your tasks, done. | P2P Culture | Scoop.it
TaskRabbit - Get just about anything done by friendly, trustworthy people. Our vetted TaskRabbits can help with errands, cleaning, delivery & so much more.
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El campo de cebada » El Campo de Cebada GOLDEN NICA en Digital Comunities

El campo de cebada » El Campo de Cebada GOLDEN NICA en Digital Comunities | P2P Culture | Scoop.it
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La colaboración no es una tecnología, es un comportamiento

La colaboración no es una tecnología, es un comportamiento | P2P Culture | Scoop.it
A estas alturas de película, mucho tenemos ya una buena cantidad de ejemplos de nuestras empresas o de otras en los que los intentos por implantar una herramienta tecnológica terminaron en un tremendo derroche de tiempo, esfuerzo y dinero.
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Percentil, la consolidación de la tienda online de ropa infantil de segunda mano

Percentil, la consolidación de la tienda online de ropa infantil de segunda mano | P2P Culture | Scoop.it
A pesar de la crisis económica hay startups que consiguen salir adelante, muchas de ellas incluso buscan en el ahorro su modelo de negocio. Este ...
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Intercambios-Cercamia.com

Intercambios-Cercamia.com | P2P Culture | Scoop.it

Tu red social gps donde intercambias invitaciones, regalos, intereses, conocimientos,idiomas, tareas y planes con gente nueva,
en base a intereses comunes.

Un sistema de intercambio avanzado que emplea las últimas tecnologías para integrar socialmente personas y empresas.

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Come la proprietà intellettuale ha trasformarto i Giochi Olimpici in un incubo cyberpunk

Come la proprietà intellettuale ha trasformarto i Giochi Olimpici in un incubo cyberpunk | P2P Culture | Scoop.it
Questo post è stato originariamente pubblicato da Calimaq in francese ed è stato tradotto in italiano grazie alla collaborazione di @sasssolina, @piccolakate, @CAnaclerio e altri che non hanno lasciato il proprio nome.
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Copenhague inaugura su red de autopistas para bicicletas

Copenhague inaugura su red de autopistas para bicicletas | P2P Culture | Scoop.it

"Durante el mes de abril ha empezado a funcionar el primer tramo de la red de autopistas para bicicletas en el área metropolitana de Copenhague (Dinamarca).

Tiene una longitud de 17,5 kilómetros y transcurre por los municipios de Copenhague, Frederiksberg, Albertslund y Rødovre.

 

Reciben el nombre de autopistas para bicicletas porque no son carriles bici convencionales. Están diseñados para llegar en el menor tiempo posible al destino, y con las mejores condiciones posibles de tráfico para los ciclistas

 

Se han creado las mejoras necesarias para que se elija la bicicleta sobre el coche en estos desplazamientos. En estos recorridos se establecen nodos desde los que llegar a universidades, colegios, centros de trabajo y terminales de transporte público.

 

Aunque el proyecto aprovecha, dadas las características urbanas de gran parte del trazado, las infraestructuras viarias existentes se separa totalmente a los ciclistas.

 

En el proyecto han participado administraciones públicas pero también ha habido una importante colaboración ciudadana..."

 

 

 

 


Via paradoxcity
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Enabling city. L'innovazione sociale (spesso) succede dove meno te lo aspetti | Saperi PA

Enabling city. L'innovazione sociale (spesso) succede dove meno te lo aspetti | Saperi PA | P2P Culture | Scoop.it
“Enabling” con un termine un po' evocativo di manuali di pedagogia può tradursi in italiano con “abilitante”. Ma è un po’ il contrario di quel che sembra, perché l’enabling city è in realtà una città che sa imparare.
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Slow cities: Uno de los dramas del urbanismo contemporáneo es su olvido de la ciudad lenta, la del peatón | Observatorio de la Sostenibilidad en España (OSE)

Slow cities: Uno de los dramas del urbanismo contemporáneo es su olvido de la ciudad lenta, la del peatón | Observatorio de la Sostenibilidad en España (OSE) | P2P Culture | Scoop.it

Paralelamente, la civilización moderna ha sufrido del síndrome de las fast cities, las ciudades pensadas exclusivamente para la rapidez de los desplazamientos, desde las autopistas hasta los trenes subterráneos. Las utopías urbanas contemporáneas, de la Ville Radieuse a Broadacre City, se estructuraron en torno a la velocidad; Caracas fue una víctima destacada de ese síndrome, al extremo que su identidad se disputa entre el Ávila y las autopistas. El lamentable resultado han sido urbes quizá funcionales, como el fast food, pero finalmente tristes, sin alma, escasamente compatibles con lo que en definitiva es la esencia de la ciudad: la capacidad de generar nuevas ideas y valores, de renovar constantemente la cultura.
La moderna es una ciudad a varias velocidades, y si sus actuales dimensiones son consecuencia de las altas velocidades permitidas por el avance tecnológico, éstas sólo valen para los desplazamientos a larga distancia. Quien se desplaza de la estación del Metro a su trabajo va a otra velocidad, la del peatón, que es la decisiva para hacer ciudad: la que permite los encuentros fortuitos, el disfrute del paisaje, incluso la reflexión pausada. Para ello ese recorrido ha de ser no sólo seguro sino animado, pleno de vida.
En un libro extraordinario Ítalo Calvino ilustra así la rapidez: "Entre las muchas virtudes de Chuang-Tzu estaba la habilidad para el dibujo. El rey le pidió dibujar un cangrejo. Chuang-Tzu le dijo que necesitaba cinco años de tiempo y una villa con doce sirvientes. Después de cinco años todavía no había empezado el dibujo. 'Necesito otros cinco años', dijo Chuang-Tzu. El rey se los concedió. Cumplidos los diez años, Chuang-Tzu tomó el pincel y en un instante, con un solo gesto, dibujó un cangrejo, el más perfecto cangrejo que jamás se hubiera visto".
Uno de los dramas del urbanismo contemporáneo es su olvido de la ciudad lenta, la del peatón, la del paseante, pero también la de los niños y los ancianos. En la medida en la cual se la recupere, como en la parábola de Calvino, madurará la ciudad rápida.

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LinkCity FP7 Project / Latest news / What is new ? / Home - Territorial Intelligence Portal. Knowledge, Methods, Governance and tools for action

LinkCity FP7 Project / Latest news / What is new ? / Home - Territorial Intelligence Portal. Knowledge, Methods, Governance and tools for action | P2P Culture | Scoop.it
Territorial Intelligence Portal.Knowledge, Methods, Governance and tools for action...
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Play the City - Play the City Foundation

Play the City - Play the City Foundation | P2P Culture | Scoop.it
Play the City Foundation, Play the City is a young foundation aiming to introduce city gaming into official planning and city design procedures.. Play the City is the sister organization of TReC Network.
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