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It’s time to take a look at the index card with all the financial advice you’ll ever need

It’s time to take a look at the index card with all the financial advice you’ll ever need | Improvement and Productivity | Scoop.it
9 simple rules that can help you live a financially secure life
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Rescooped by Kat Plata from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
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The Benefits of No-Tech Note Taking | Carol E. Holstead | Chronicle of Higher Education

The Benefits of No-Tech Note Taking | Carol E. Holstead | Chronicle of Higher Education | Improvement and Productivity | Scoop.it

The moment of truth for me came in the spring 2013 semester. I looked out at my visual-communication class and saw a group of six students transfixed by the blue glow of a video on one of their computers, and decided I was done allowing laptops in my large lecture class. "Done" might be putting it mildly. Although I am an engaging lecturer, I could not compete with Facebook and YouTube, and I was tired of trying.

The next semester I told students they would have to take notes on paper. Period.

I knew that eliminating laptops in my classroom would reduce distractions. Research has shown that when students use their laptops to "multitask" during class, they don’t retain as much of the lecture. But I also had a theory, based on my college experience from the dark ages—the 70s, aka, before PowerPoint—that students would process lectures more effectively if they took notes on paper. When students took notes on laptops they barely looked up from their computers, so intent were they on transcribing every word I said. Back in my day, if a professor’s lectures were reasonably well organized, I could take notes in outline format. I had to listen for the key points and subpoints.

Some of the students I teach are journalism majors. For them, taking notes by hand is an enormously helpful skill since journalists often have no choice but to take notes on paper. You can tape an interview, but transcribing tapes is inefficient when you’re on deadline, and you’re not going to pull out a laptop in somebody’s office or in the middle of a protest and start typing. Now, if you’re interviewing people over the phone, you might type as they talk, but if you try typing every single word your interview subjects say, you end up not really listening to them.

In laying down my no-tech note-taking decree, I explained that it would help students engage in the lectures and also pay off later in their careers. I use PowerPoint in my visual-communication course but only to outline the lecture and show examples of designs. I told students they would need to listen to what I said about each slide and selectively write down the important points. I said I believed they would remember more of my lectures by taking notes on paper.

It turned out my theory was right and now is supported by research.

 

Click headline to read more and access hot links--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.'s curator insight, March 12, 2015 11:27 AM

The results do not surprise me, but also encourage to ponder further what we mean today by "learning."

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15 Secrets of the Most Successful Self-Learners

15 Secrets of the Most Successful Self-Learners | Improvement and Productivity | Scoop.it

For many curious folks, their impassioned yearning to soak up as much of the world’s wonders as possible completely transcends the boundaries of a traditional classroom. Armed with an insatiable lust for knowledge, they set out to acquire it on their own terms, although a few pointers obviously can’t hurt before departure and landing!

 

Not every possible technique will necessarily stick with all self-motivated learners, of course, but the only way to find out is to test them. Try some of the following and experiment with what works in a more independent educational setting.

 

 


Via Gust MEES
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John Michel's curator insight, June 24, 2013 8:07 AM

Great insights on how to invest in yourself.

Carolyn Williams's curator insight, June 24, 2013 9:34 AM

A personal emotional intelligence growth curve

Annette Swann's curator insight, June 24, 2013 8:12 PM

Be a great leader? = Be a great learner.

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The Pen Is Mightier Than the Keyboard: Longhand or Laptop Note Taking?

The Pen Is Mightier Than the Keyboard: Longhand or Laptop Note Taking? | Improvement and Productivity | Scoop.it

Abstract

 

Taking notes on laptops rather than in longhand is increasingly common. Many researchers have suggested that laptop note taking is less effective than longhand note taking for learning. Prior studies have primarily focused on students’ capacity for multitasking and distraction when using laptops. The present research suggests that even when laptops are used solely to take notes, they may still be impairing learning because their use results in shallower processing. In three studies, we found that students who took notes on laptops performed worse on conceptual questions than students who took notes longhand. We show that whereas taking more notes can be beneficial, laptop note takers’ tendency to transcribe lectures verbatim rather than processing information and reframing it in their own words is detrimental to learning.


Via Mel Riddile
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What 11 successful people wish they'd known about money in their 20s

What 11 successful people wish they'd known about money in their 20s | Improvement and Productivity | Scoop.it
Even the hot shots didn't know it all in their 20s.
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