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Health Claims and the false flag "problem" at the bottom of the European claims regulation

Health Claims and the false flag "problem" at the bottom of the European claims regulation | Oslo Hudlege | Scoop.it

In Article 4 of the Nutrition and Health Claims Regulation (NHCR), the European legislature entrusted to the European Commission the task of establishing “Nutrient Profiles.”

 

These profiles should separate politically desirable from politically “undesirable” foods, so that no health claims should ever appear on foods profiled as “undesirable” by the consumer advocates that seek to prevent that consumers shall get “desirable” nutrients via ice cream, candies, salty and fatty snacks, sweet biscuits.

 

This is the ascetic ideology that has grown out of the unproven allegation that “many consumers that are eating them [“undesirable” foods] in moderation would consume them in greater quantities” when manufacturers would be permitted to allude to the fact that “undesirable” foods contain “desirable” nutrients that do “desirable” things...


Via Sepp Hasslberger
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Sepp Hasslberger's curator insight, September 13, 2013 11:43 AM

Claims are things companies say on product labels. "Health claims" are things they say or rather write about the product (a food, a supplement, a herb) that explains what it's good for in terms of staying healthy.

 

The European Union has issued a regulation, applicable in all member countries, that all such statements must be centrally approved. 

Sounds good? Well, it really disrupts the flow of information. VERY VERY few such "claims" have been approved, and it doesn't look like it will get much better soon.

Companies selling healthy food basically can't say why you should buy them (what the foods are good for in terms of health...

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Hudlege - Hudlege Oslo - Botox - Oslo Hudlegesenter

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Botox mot rynker specialist Center could be a non-public specialist clinic of 600 money supply within the heart of Christianity. The middle contains a short latency to the specialist, and you are doing not would like a referral. Christianity Center specialist specializing in optical device treatment, and has the foremost advanced and latest instrumentation. Dermatologists account for all consultations, treatments and once controls. The middle has not compensation.

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When Smartphones Do a Doctor’s Job | MIT

When Smartphones Do a Doctor’s Job | MIT | Oslo Hudlege | Scoop.it

At EyeNetra, the startup he cofounded, goofy curiosities like plastic eyeballs line the shelves, and a 3-D printing machine whirs in the background. It’s printing out prototypes of a device that will attach to your smartphone and, in a minute or two, tell you what kind of eyeglasses you need.

The device, called the Netra-G, is based on some clever optics and software Pamplona came up with—a way to measure the refractive error of the eye using a smartphone screen and an inexpensive pair of plastic binoculars. The whole setup might cost a few dollars to make. It does the job of a $5,000 instrument called an autorefractor.

 

More important, just about anyone could use it. That’s where the disruption comes in—and the trouble. Right now, only doctors or optometrists can prescribe glasses or contact lenses. Pamplona, a brash Brazilian programmer who arrived in the U.S. a few years ago, thinks that won’t always be the case. “We’re changing medicine by providing the user the right to measure themselves,” he says. “We see doctors as more of a coach.”


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Botox mot rynker specialist Center could be a non-public specialist clinic of 600 money supply within the heart of Christianity. The middle contains a short latency to the specialist, and you are doing not would like a referral.http://oslohudlegesenter.no/

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Andrew N Levy's curator insight, September 15, 2013 8:36 PM

The first thing I notice is that the rest of the title has been cut off. The whole title should read, "When Smartphones Do a Doctor's Job...Better". What does that tell you about the state of physicians in this country when an app could potentially replace them? Can we really blame them when the Affordable Care Act will leave them getting reimbursed about as much as chiropractors get now? (i.e. not much)

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Hexoskin is putting the wearable in wearable computing with a sensor-packed shirt

Hexoskin is putting the wearable in wearable computing with a sensor-packed shirt | Oslo Hudlege | Scoop.it

Feeling like you just aren’t quite quantifying enough of your daily life? Check out Hexoskin, a maker of connected tanks that track your heart and respiration as well as your steps.

 

Tracking your steps will be so 2012 if the sensor-packed athletic tank that the folks at Hexoskin have designed takes off. The company, which was formed in 2006, recently launched an Indiegogo campaign featuring a shirt that contains an ECG sensor, two breathing sensors and an accelerometer.

 

This is a washable shirt, much like the folks at Heapsylon are doing with washable sensor-packed socks, and the data this short generates looks pretty impressive. The shirt contains the sensors, but to transmit that information you plug a box into the shirt (there’s a pocket it slips into), and then you view the data on a smartphone app.

 

“This is like the PC market was in ’75 when there were all these small names and no big players,” said Hexoskin CEO Fournier in an interview. “I think over the next five to ten years we’re going to see the wearable market expand a lot.” Personally, I’m thrilled about the opportunity this offers for research, medical monitoring, the quantified self and art and design.

 

Clothes are a pretty reasonable combination of function (they cover you up and keep you warm) and self-expression. Imagine what happens as we expand that functionality and offer even more options for self-expression via sensors and wireless links back to the cloud.

  

 


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Tammera Marrs's curator insight, November 22, 2013 11:06 AM

I would love to be part of marketing this product!  I see a very bright future for Hexoskin!