Origins & Backgrounds of People in the Local Community
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Introduction | Area Focus: Villawood

Introduction | Area Focus: Villawood | Origins & Backgrounds of People in the Local Community | Scoop.it
Claudia Saunders's insight:

This topic is a collection of five resources that would be valuable for the teaching of the HSIE Stage 2 CUS2.3 outcome, specifically aiding students as they learn about "Origins and backgrounds of people in the local community".

 

When creating learning experiences for this dot point teachers would focus on the locality of their school and use resources specific to their area. Similarly the resources curated here have a geographical focus, the Greater Western Sydney region, more specifically, Villawood. Many of the resources, however, can be adapted to align with other areas. 

 

These resources not only explore the ethnic backgrounds in Villawood but also the origins of the cultural landscape. They look at the traditional owners of the land, the Darug people and  the refugees and immigrants who have contributed to the diversity of the area as well as addressing the nature of the ethnic backgrounds i.e. help students to learn more about the countries that immigrants commonly come from. 

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Social atlas | Fairfield City | atlas.id

Social atlas | Fairfield City | atlas.id | Origins & Backgrounds of People in the Local Community | Scoop.it
The Fairfield City Social atlas displays a collection of thematic maps based on the 2011 Census, an important tool for future planning and development.
Claudia Saunders's insight:

INQUIRY QUESTIONS: What are the dominant ethnic backgrounds in the area of Villawood? What is the effect of this diversity?

 

THE RESOURCE: The ‘Social Atlas’ creates maps of areas that visually represent features of that area. You can select whether you want the map to show population, age structure, income & wellbeing, education, work, transport, or diversity. Diversity, evidently the most relevant for the subject matter, is further broken down into several categories such as ATSI, born overseas, recent arrivals, non-English speaking background etc.

 

The website is advanced and would be within the zone of proximal development for Stage 2 students, hence scaffolding is required to maximise learning. (Silver, 2011). With the implementation of the appropriate support measures outlined below, however, this resource holds valuable information.

 

TEACHING IDEA: There is great scope for inquiry based learning using this resource. First, due to the aforementioned complexity of the website it would be appropriate for the teacher to look at the website with the whole class, modelling how you can interpret the information. Questioning of the students would be used at this stage to gauge student understanding and ensure active participation.

 

Following this whole class explanation, students could be split in pairs and given access to computers to explore the website themselves. Using a worksheet devised by the teacher the students could then use the website to answer a series of questions about the data presented. The worksheet would include instructions for the students to refer back to and then comprehension questions that require direct and accurate interpretation of the information. Finally, the worksheet would have a section for students to independently find information on diversity and record what they personally found interesting about the information. Their findings would be discussed as a class, again with a focus on how this diversity impacts the community positively.

 

ASSESSMENT: Questioning the students during the modelling exercise presents an assessment opportunity, allowing the teacher to gauge understanding and adjust their teaching accordingly. The student’s worksheets would also provide concrete assessment. The student’s ability to accurately record information represents skill based learning whilst the section that gives them the autonomy to look at any aspect of diversity encourages more inquiry based learning (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011).

 

REFERENCES:

Silver, D. (2011). Using the "Zone" to Help Reach Every Learner. Kappa Delta Pi Record, 48, 28-31.

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching society and environment (4th ed.). South Melbourne, Vic.: Cengage Learning.

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The Little Refugee by Anh Do and Suzanne Do - YouTube

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Claudia Saunders's insight:

INQUIRY QUESTIONS: Why do people choose to come to Australia as refugees? What are the difficulties they face in adapting to life in Australia? How do refugees contribute to the Australian community?

 

THE RESOURCE: This is a children’s picture book entitled ‘The Little Refugee’, which is an autobiographical account of comedian Anh Do’s experience of coming to Australia as a refugee from Vietnam. This source is highly relevant when looking at the origins and backgrounds of the local community in Villawood as this area has a high immigrant and refugee population. Furthermore Villawood has a large Vietnamese population making the text highly relevant.

 

The text is a developmentally appropriate medium for exploring the notion of refugees and gives first hand insight into the refugee experience. Crucially, it focuses on Anh Do’s life as a primary aged student new to Australia which is highly relatable to Stage 2 students and therefore likely to be more engaging (McInerney & McInerney, 2010).

 

TEACHING IDEA: Initially the teacher would read the text to the class, using appropriate literacy strategies to encourage the students to be active readers. For example, prior to the reading the class could look at the front cover and suggest what they think the story will be about which activates their prior knowledge about refugees and help the teacher gauge what that knowledge is (Winch et al., 2010). Then the teacher would read the text to the class. Following the reading the teacher could ask a series of comprehension and interpretation questions to initiate class discussion of the text. For example:

 

-          Why did Anh Do and his family leave Vietnam?

-          Was it easy for them to get to Australia safely?

-          Why do you think they would put themselves in danger to come to Australia?

-          What did Anh Do find difficult about life in Australia?

-          How was he different to the other students?

-          Why did Anh Do ask the redheaded boy if he wanted to play handball?

-          Why do you think Anh Do wanted to make his parents proud?

-          How have Anh Do & his family contributed to Australia?

 

This text can be linked to the prior activities looking at the diversity of the area. The teacher can draw explicit links by suggesting that the diversity in Villawood can be attributed, in part, to the refugees and immigrants who have settled here having come from all around the world. Additionally in the previous activities the students would have determined that there is a significant Vietnamese population in the area, which the teacher can highlight.  

 

In discussing Anh Do’s differences (e.g. the food he bought to school) attention can be drawn to the fact that immigrants bring with them their own customs, practices, symbols, languages, traditions and this contributes to community identity. This is highly relevant to outcome CUS2.3.  This discussion should celebrate diversity as enriching the community. Dyer (2011) states that seeing diversity as a positive thing enriches student’s human rights perspective, another key area of the HSIE syllabus.

 

LITERACY STRATEGY: Following the class discussion the class could complete a literacy activity, an empathy task whereby they write a diary entry in the persona of Anh Do in his first days of school in Australia. They should focus on the hardships he faces and his feelings about his experiences. Through this activity students are putting themselves in the shoes of people from different cultural backgrounds and gaining a better understanding of their origins, how they came to be in Australia.

 

ASSESSMENT: Observation during class discussion would form part of assessment. The empathy task also represents an assessment opportunity as it will allow students to demonstrate their understanding of Anh Do’s experiences.

 

 REFERENCES:

Do, A., & Do, S. (2011). The little refugee: The inspiring true story of Australia's happiest refugee. Sydney, NSW: Allen & Unwin.

 

Dyer, J. (2011). Teaching for social justice, diversity and human rights (pp.364-385). South Melbourne, Vic.: Cengage Learning.

 

McInerney, D. M., & McInerney, V. (2010). Educational Psychology – Constructing Learning (5th Ed.) Frenchs Forest: Pearson. 

 

Winch, G., Johnston, R. R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L., & Holliday, M. (2010) Literacy: Reading, writing & children's literature. (4th ed.). South Melbourne, Vic.: Oxford University Press. 

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ABC Splash ­ ConCensus

ABC Splash ­ ConCensus | Origins & Backgrounds of People in the Local Community | Scoop.it
Bring Australian statistics to life with ConCensus - a data visualisation game where students can interact with real data from the 2011 ABS Census.
Claudia Saunders's insight:

INQUIRY QUESTIONS: What are the dominant ethnic backgrounds in the area of Villawood? What is the effect of this diversity?

 

THE RESOURCE: The Australian Bureau of Statistics website collates census data that is highly relevant for examining origins and backgrounds of people within the local community. However, a dilemma arises when trying to use the ABS website in a primary context as the site and its data presentation are not developmentally appropriate for Stage 2 students.  This ‘Concensus’ programme from the ABC Splash website is an ideal alternative. It presents census data in a simplistic, user friendly manner that can be easily accessed by Stage 2 students.

 

 This resource allows you to enter the relevant postcode and view a variety of different graphical representations of statistical data on the ethnic backgrounds of that specific area. This visual depiction of census information allows for easier interpretation and engagement. Exploration of these graphs is the ideal introduction to this subject matter.

 

TEACHING IDEA: There is significant scope for using this resource in inquiry based learning experiences. First the teacher could show the Consensus ‘Ethnic Backgrounds’ graph of the local area and model how to interpret these graphs. Through questioning the teacher can engage students in a class discussion about the data, key points to highlight would be:

 

-          Identify the largest ethnic groups within the local area e.g. In Villawood this would be Vietnamese and Lebanese.

-          Highlight the variety of ethnicities, relate this to the idea of multiculturalism

As this resource is being examined in relation to HSIE outcome CUS2.3 “Explains how shared customs, practices, symbols, language and traditions in communities contribute to Australian and community identities” it is relevant to also discuss the following:

-          In what ways can the influence of the dominant ethnic groups been seen in our community?

-          What are the benefits of having a diverse mix of ethnic backgrounds?

 

NUMERACY STRATEGY: Additionally, as this resource involves the interpretation of graphs there is scope to integrate numeracy. Students could collaboratively conduct a survey of the ethnic backgrounds of their class. Through scaffolded creation of a data table they could record the different ethnic backgrounds of students and create a simple column graph using this information, a task which aligns with the Stage 2 Mathematics curriculum, outcome MA2-18SP: “Constructs, compares, interprets and evaluates data displays, including tables, picture graphs and column graphs”. This activity would be highly engaging for students as it focuses on their personal context (McInerney & McInerney, 2010). Following the completion of their own graphs students could compare their findings with that of Consensus.

 

ASSESSMENT: Assessment could be carried out through observation of class discussion. This can be problematic however as not all students may feel comfortable contributing to whole class conversations. Hence, strategies such as ‘Think, Pair, Share’ could be used so that the teacher can observe student discussion in smaller groups prior to whole class discussion. The graphs the students produce can provide the basis for the mathematics assessment.

 

REFERENCES:

Board of Studies, NSW. (2014). Mathematics. Sydney: B.O.S. Retrieved April 5, 2014, from http://syllabus.bos.nsw.edu.au/mathematics/. 

 

McInerney, D. M., & McInerney, V. (2010). Educational Psychology – Constructing Learning (5th Ed.) Frenchs Forest: Pearson. 

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KARI Aboriginal Resources Inc. - Culture - Local Aboriginal History

KARI Aboriginal Resources Inc. - Culture - Local Aboriginal History | Origins & Backgrounds of People in the Local Community | Scoop.it
Claudia Saunders's insight:

INQUIRY QUESTION: What are the Indigenous origins and backgrounds of the Villawood area?

 

THE RESOURCE: This is an information site about the local Aboriginal culture of Western Sydney. When teaching Aboriginal perspectives it is crucial that you localise the content (Smyth, 2014). Too often Aboriginal culture is handled in a general fashion and stereotype emerges. It is important to instead acknowledge the individuality of each clan, their specific language, traditions and stories (Harrison, 2011).

 

This website goes into great detail about the Darug, Tharawal and Gandangara tribes that all lived in the Liverpool area. The site is very content dense and hence is probably a resource for the teacher to use to inform their teaching rather than for the students to interact with directly. The website has been produced by the KARI Aboriginal Resources Incorporated, a not-for-profit community organisation, in conjunction with the Liverpool Regional Museum. Hence as it has been produced by an Indigenous body and aligns with the selection criteria. We can assume the information is accurate and being conveyed in a culturally appropriate manner.

 

TEACHING IDEA:  As previously stated, the website is very content dense and would not be appropriate for students to access as it is not presented in a manner that is developmentally appropriate. The language is not of a Stage 2 level and this will prevent both understanding and engagement, undermining its usefulness as a resource (Winch et. al., 2010). Instead this resource should be used to inform the teacher’s understanding of the origins of the local Aboriginal culture.

 

When exploring Aboriginal perspectives, teachers often feel ill-equipped and avoid the topic all together (Smyth, 2014). An excellent resource that can support teachers is to use the services provided by the AECG to consult a local Aboriginal person to aid in the teaching of Aboriginal perspectives. Harrison (2011) emphasises the benefits of engaging with the local Aboriginal community in this way.  Hence, the following learning experience assumes that a local Indigenous person will be visiting the class to conduct a ‘Question & Answer’ style session with students about local Aboriginal origins.

 

First the teacher would conduct an introductory lesson on Aboriginal culture that conveys the following key points:

-          Emphasise the vast number of clans/tribes in Australia – could be done through use of an Aboriginal languages map.

-          Emphasise the individuality of each of these clan/tribes and the fact that they all have different traditions and customs. Whilst there are similarities between clans their own identity is important.

-          Introduce the idea that in the local area of south west Sydney there was three main clans.

-          Explain that illness brought by Europeans killed thousands of Aboriginal people and forced clans together, compromising their cultural history.

 

Following this introductory explanation of local Indigenous culture students could individually or in pairs complete a ‘Know | Want | Learn’ chart. This is a graphic organiser comprising of three columns. In the first column students write everything they think they know about a topic, in this case the local Aboriginal culture. The second column they list everything they want to learn about this topic. These first two columns are completed at the beginning of a topic and are excellent for teacher assessment and planning. Furthermore it gives students some sense of autonomy over what they learn, promoting the idea that their interests are appreciated. The final ‘Learn’ column is completed at the end of the topic and students record what they have learnt that they have found interesting. Gilbert & Hoepper (2011) emphasise the value of creating an inquiry based sequence when teaching HSIE, and the importance of doing this in a planned and purposeful way. This graphic organiser is an excellent example of this in action as it gives direction to the unit, ensuring that the overarching questions are answered.

 

Having assessed what students know and want to learn the teacher can use this to develop a list of common misconceptions amongst the students and common areas they would like to know more about. As a class they could then devise a series of questions to ask the visiting Aboriginal representative using this list.

 

ASSESSMENT: The Know | Want | Learn table is a valuable assessment tool as it enables the teacher to gauge what the students already know and assess their ability to devise inquiry questions which are the basis for quality HSIE learning (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011).

 

REFERENCES:

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching society and environment (4th ed.). South Melbourne, Vic.: Cengage Learning.

 

Harrison, N. (2011). Teaching and learning in Aboriginal education (2nd ed.). South Melbourne, Vic.: Oxford University Press.

 

Smyth, C. (2014, March 26). Embedding Aboriginal Perspectives (Notes of lecture).

 

 Winch, G., Johnston, R. R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L., & Holliday, M. (2010) Literacy: Reading, writing & children's literature. (4th ed.). South Melbourne, Vic.: Oxford University Press. 

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A Day in the Life: Vietnam | TIME For Kids

A Day in the Life: Vietnam | TIME For Kids | Origins & Backgrounds of People in the Local Community | Scoop.it
Claudia Saunders's insight:

INQUIRY QUESTION: What are the features of the ethnic backgrounds of people in the local community?

 

THE RESOURCE:  Having now identified the dominant ethnic groups in the local community and explored some of their motivations for coming to Australia it is now relevant to explore the nature of their culture and reflect on the benefits of having diversity amongst the community.

 

This online resource produced by ‘Time’ magazine is a fantastic website for stage 2 students. It has country profiles on over 50 nations. Within the profiles there is information about the size, population, capital, language, currency , flag and climate of the country. They also have historical timelines for each country, basic language guides and quizzes. An additional feature, which will be the focus of our learning experience is the ‘Day in the Life’ section.  This feature takes you through, hour by hour, a day in the life of a child from that country.

 

This resource represents a global perspective as it looks holistically at international diversity and encourages worldwide education about different cultures. 

 

TEACHING IDEA: The previous resources have introduced students to the variety of cultures in their local area. This activity aims to teach them more about those cultures and also highlight the similarities between them and students of other cultures.

Working in pairs students are to explore one of the countries who make up one of the dominant ethnic groups within their area. For example, for Villawood this could be Vietnam. Students are to create a Venn diagram comparing the foreign country to Australia and comparing their own daily life to that of the child from the comparison country.

 

This task is appropriate for Stage 2 students; though it requires a lot of independent work the ‘Time for Kids’ is a website specifically designed for primary aged students and hence is easy to navigate and understand for this age group. Additionally as it is a child friendly website from a reliable source so students are safeguarded from the dangers of the internet, the importance of which is highlight by Gilbert & Hoepper (2011).  The content presented is of an appropriate depth and will enable them to complete the task with only minimal scaffolding.

 

The teacher could pre-prepare a worksheet with a Venn diagram template which could include some ‘prompts’ with things they should look for to compare. For example, population or in the daily life section, what they have for breakfast. Venn diagrams are another graphic organiser that effectively focuses students as the collect information and structures that collection. It is an excellent means of organising ideas and making comparisons (Cole & Chan, 1987).

Following the completion of their tasks students would return to a whole class setting where they would discuss their findings. The teacher should scaffold this discussion by focusing on the following areas:

 

-          When looking at differences between countries/lifestyles discuss how this might affect someone coming to Australia. Could link to ‘The Little Refugee’ and Anh Do’s experience.

-          Emphasise similarities and the idea that though we live in different countries we have some similar experiences.

-          Discuss the fact that people who move to Australia bring with them their own traditions, beliefs, customs, symbols etc. and that these can be embraced by our society and celebrated.

-          Discuss the idea that diversity makes our community more interesting and we can show respect for other ethnic groups by taking an interest in their cultures.

 

ASSESSMENT: During the independent inquiry work the teacher would be circulating the room and observing the students as they work, offering help as required but also assessing the student’s ability to engage with the website and make comparisons. Similarly the concluding class discussion provides another opportunity to gauge student understanding. Finally the Venn diagram they produce will be an indication of their grasp of this area.

 

REFERENCES:

Cole, P. G., & Chan, L.K.S. (1987). Teaching principles and practices. Hobart, Tasmania: Prentice Hall.

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching society and environment (4th ed.). South Melbourne, Vic.: Cengage Learning.

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