Organizational Behaviour Fleming College
453 views | +0 today
Follow
Organizational Behaviour Fleming College
Organizational Behaviour, Canada, organizational behavior, management
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Sharon Archibald
Scoop.it!

After Two Years Of Trying 6-Hour Workdays, These Companies Say It Worked

After Two Years Of Trying 6-Hour Workdays, These Companies Say It Worked | Organizational Behaviour Fleming College | Scoop.it
Tell your boss: An experiment in Sweden led to happier and healthier workers–and no loss in production.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharon Archibald
Scoop.it!

10 TED Talks to Make You a Better You

10 TED Talks to Make You a Better You | Organizational Behaviour Fleming College | Scoop.it

Discover a better you by listening to these 10 wise TED Talks, because when you know better you do better.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharon Archibald
Scoop.it!

Something Extraordinary Is Happening in the World, and I Am Noticing It

Something Extraordinary Is Happening in the World, and I Am Noticing It | Organizational Behaviour Fleming College | Scoop.it
“n a blog titled "Something Extraordinary Is Happening in the World, and Most People Haven't Noticed" Brazilian entrepreneur Gustavo Tanaka listed 8 reasons why he believes that the world as we know it is changing - and that it is a good thing.His blog has been widely shared, so clearly his message has resonated with many. I am one of them and I felt compelled to share 8 examples that validate how these changes are playing out in a human life. Mine, to be more precise.1. No one can stand the employment model any longer.After 12 years of senior leadership roles in the corporate world, I looked myself in the mirror one day and asked "Am I still making a difference or am I caught up in the corporate spin wheel, endlessly running and no longer knowing why?"The answer from the woman in the mirror triggered a chain of events. I said goodbye to the corner office and the "golden handcuffs", jumped off the spin wheel and started my own company; helping leaders create inspired corporate cultures where people really feel they make a difference with what they do.It was the best choice of my life.2. The entrepreneurship model is also changingBecoming an entrepreneur was beyond scary and to some appeared an insane choice. I left my safe job, sold my house and moved from Oslo, Norway to big vibrant London to build my dream. A year later my co-founder joined; she shared my dream and was also willing to risk it all to make it work. Together we became a company we loved working for.We know we have the ideas, the skills and the passionate will to do this. As most entrepreneurs we are building the road as we are walking on it, learning from our mistakes as we are making them, and above all; keeping our relentless optimism and enthusiasm intact while never losing sight of the big dream. The big dream of a corporate spring and better work lives for all.Investors have made us offers but we have continued to choose freedom over security.We might have a few regrets, but building our own dream instead of being hired to build someone else's dream definitely won't be one of them.3. The rise of collaborationThe world is changing rapidly so the way we work, lead and operate needs to change accordingly. In a highly complex and rapidly evolving economy, a vibrant corporate culture has become a business essential and a prerequisite for growth.Still, most business leaders struggle with it and 9 out of 10 workers say they are not engaged in their jobs as a consequence. This is bad news for business, and bad news for people's quality of life.This needs to change and change fast. Those of us who are passionately driven to make these changes need to know about, support and help each other."Who are your competitors" people ask. "We don't have competitors, we have collaborators, and we need a whole lot more of them!" is my reply.4. We are finally figuring out what the internet is When I first started my company, Skype became my new best friend and I spent my first months speaking with clients in Europe, US and Asia on daily basis from my kitchen table in Oslo.Today, living in buzzing London, with clients and collaborators from all around the world accessible in person and online, the world is our oyster, our laptops are our offices and flexibility is our business model and way of life. New and interesting people and connections keep showing up in our lives through social media; like this Brazilian blogger on the other side of the world - thinking, feeling and seeing the same things as we are. We need to talk!The world is getting smaller, we are getting wiser and more”
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharon Archibald from Managing Technology and Talent for Learning & Innovation
Scoop.it!

Holacracy and New Organizational Structures for the Future of Work -

Holacracy and New Organizational Structures for the Future of Work - | Organizational Behaviour Fleming College | Scoop.it
“Today my guest for the Future of Work Podcast is Alexis Gonzales-Black. Alexis is the former organizational design lead for Zappos, and is currently the co-founder of Thoughtful Org Partners. Previously, I spoke with Brian J. Robertson, the creator of the concept of Holacracy. This concept received fame because of Zappos initiatives around Holacracy. Alexis is one of the people who helped lead the entire Holacracy transition there. [...]”
Via Carlos Fosca
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharon Archibald
Scoop.it!

44 Daily Activities to Enjoy your Work (Infographic)

44 Daily Activities to Enjoy your Work (Infographic) | Organizational Behaviour Fleming College | Scoop.it
Infographic crafted with love by Officevibe, the corporate team building and employee engagement platform.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharon Archibald from digitalNow
Scoop.it!

Emotional Intelligence ~ 20 Years On

Emotional Intelligence ~ 20 Years On | Organizational Behaviour Fleming College | Scoop.it
In 1995, Emotional Intelligence: Why it Can Matter More than IQ by Daniel Goleman was published. The introduction of Emotional Intelligence (EI) generated a great deal of excitement and hope. Nearl...

Via Don Dea
more...
Don Dea's curator insight, June 20, 2013 2:21 AM

The ability to monitor one’s own and others’ feelings and emotions, to discriminate among them and to use the information to guide one’s thinking and actions.”

Rescooped by Sharon Archibald from digitalNow
Scoop.it!

What If Human Capital Was An Asset On The Balance Sheet?

What If Human Capital Was An Asset On The Balance Sheet? | Organizational Behaviour Fleming College | Scoop.it
assets but our accounting systems do not count them as so. As information technology created more and more opportunities for automation, a new class of

Via Don Dea
more...
Don Dea's curator insight, June 20, 2013 2:23 AM

Economic Measures Will Change In Time…

With Wall Street’s continued demand to maximize shareholder value, the recognition that people are an asset makes a compelling business case for several reasons.

  1. Academic and private sector research suggest that companies that invest in their employees, and therefore create a positive environment in which they can work, perform better financially than their competitors. Stakeholders, however, deserve access to data beyond a letter from the CEO that would verify this fact.
  2. The number of socially responsible investors is only on the upswing, and a transparent methodology by which stakeholders can measure this metric will only win trust and additional investment in the long run.
  3. Wall Street’s fixation on short-term results will change as a new valuation paradigm will emerge and subsequently encourage executive behavior to invest in their employees, not drop the axe when a bad quarterly report hits the news wires.
Scooped by Sharon Archibald
Scoop.it!

Not A Happy Accident: How Google Deliberately Designs Workplace Satisfaction

Not A Happy Accident: How Google Deliberately Designs Workplace Satisfaction | Organizational Behaviour Fleming College | Scoop.it
“Imagine a world where most organizations were the best place to work.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharon Archibald
Scoop.it!

Death To Core Competency: Lessons From Nike, Apple, Netflix

Death To Core Competency: Lessons From Nike, Apple, Netflix | Organizational Behaviour Fleming College | Scoop.it
Known for decades as a shoe company, Nike is undergoing a digital revolution. In recent years, it's launched everything from apps that are standard issue on the iPhone to wearable devices to web services.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharon Archibald
Scoop.it!

Ice Breaker: What Do You Wonder About?

Ice Breaker: What Do You Wonder About? | Organizational Behaviour Fleming College | Scoop.it
The Four Quadrant Poster is the newest activity added to Technology-Enhanced Social Emotional Activities.  I love using this activity as an icebreaker for students to get to know one another and to...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharon Archibald
Scoop.it!

Leaders of People: Some are Wonderful, Some are Clueless, The Rest are Somewhere In Between by Peter Scholtes

Leaders of People: Some are Wonderful, Some are Clueless, The Rest are Somewhere In Between by Peter Scholtes | Organizational Behaviour Fleming College | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharon Archibald
Scoop.it!

Screwing Up Could Be Your Best Career Move--If You Do It Right

Screwing Up Could Be Your Best Career Move--If You Do It Right | Organizational Behaviour Fleming College | Scoop.it
I've admired Southwest Airlines for many years, and I've cited them as a company with a clear focus, a vibrant soul, and a culture you can see in all areas of their business and reflected in their business performance.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharon Archibald
Scoop.it!

How To Solve Problems Like Sherlock Holmes

How To Solve Problems Like Sherlock Holmes | Organizational Behaviour Fleming College | Scoop.it
Are you a Dr. Watson or a Sherlock Holmes?If we could choose between a Watsonian and Holmesian mind, I’m sure most of us would prefer Holmes. He’s brilliant and perceptive: the consummate problem-solver.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharon Archibald
Scoop.it!

A Psychologist Finally Explains Why You Hate Teamwork So Much

A Psychologist Finally Explains Why You Hate Teamwork So Much | Organizational Behaviour Fleming College | Scoop.it
It's partly your personality, and partly the role that you're trying to shoehorn it into.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharon Archibald from Living Leadership
Scoop.it!

If You Want to Be a Great Leader, Spend Some Time Alone

If You Want to Be a Great Leader, Spend Some Time Alone | Organizational Behaviour Fleming College | Scoop.it
In an always-connected work environment, it's hard to find time to reflect by yourself. Here's why the best leaders take their alone time seriously.
Via Matthew Fritz
more...
Matthew Fritz's curator insight, December 28, 2015 3:38 PM
Take advantage of your holiday downtime to reconnect with your most valuable leader...you!
Scooped by Sharon Archibald
Scoop.it!

Will you disrupt? Leading business transformation in the digital age

Will you disrupt? Leading business transformation in the digital age | Organizational Behaviour Fleming College | Scoop.it

Are you the Disruptor? Or the Disrupted? Leading business transformation in the digital age.

more...
Jesper Lowgren's curator insight, January 6, 2016 7:38 PM

McKinsey in early 2015 released a paper showing that 77% of transformation projects fail. The key disruptive digital capability is agility, beginning with new thinking (re-aligning to our WHY and purpose), followed by new doing (new operating models).

Rescooped by Sharon Archibald from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

What is Creativity?

What is Creativity? | Organizational Behaviour Fleming College | Scoop.it

What is Creativity?


In the leadership development world, creativity is currently getting a great deal of attention. But what is it? Can you learn it? Is it a skill? How do we lead in ways that encourage it?


When we explore the question “What is creativity?” from a thinking and learning point of view, an open and active mind is clearly required – one that can see new possibilities. But is there more to it than that? This post explores the variables that make up what we think of as “creativity.”

 

Read more:

http://leadingincontext.com/category/context-2/

 


Via Gust MEES
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharon Archibald from World's Best Infographics
Scoop.it!

Millennials Are Rewriting the Rules of Work and Entrepreneurship

Millennials Are Rewriting the Rules of Work and Entrepreneurship | Organizational Behaviour Fleming College | Scoop.it

HR and communication challenge s ahead... What do Millennials want? Flexibility and independence top the list, according to a new study, “Millennials and the Future of Work,” from oDesk.... Millennial workers want freedom and the flexibility to work how they want. Many Millennials have a “freelance” attitude. Almost nine in 10 (89 percent) say they prefer to work when and where they choose (compared to a corporate, 9-to-5 job). When comparing freelance work to “regular” jobs, Millennials say freelancing gives them more freedom to: - Work wherever they like (92 percent). - Work whenever they like (87 percent). - Work on more interesting projects (69 percent). - Travel while working (half say they’d prefer this to taking vacation time). You Might Have a Closet Freelancer on Your Staff Many Millennials are biding their time at regular jobs and freelancing on the side until the time is right to leave. Nearly three-fourths (71 percent) of those who work regular jobs want to quit to be entirely independent; 61 percent say they likely will quit within two years, and 17 percent say they definitely will....


Via Jeff Domansky
more...
carol k's curator insight, May 16, 2013 11:25 AM

Very interesting, the technology certainly exists to make this real. Organisational structures however, are slower to change. The move to flexibility I think is a good one, affording a better work life balance.

Rescooped by Sharon Archibald from digitalNow
Scoop.it!

You Get What You Reward (or Tolerate)

You Get What You Reward (or Tolerate) | Organizational Behaviour Fleming College | Scoop.it
Why do middle managers act the way they do? Why do front line employees behave as they do? A coaching client of mine recently told me of a loud disagreement that happened between two of this CEO's ...

Via Don Dea
more...
Don Dea's curator insight, June 20, 2013 2:22 AM

Behaviors like these help create a “playing field” where players debate ideas and solutions but maintain trust and respect for their peers and staff:

  • I do not take it personally when someone challenges a process that I own.
  • I listen with noble intent, seeking to understand the speaker’s viewpoint and needs.
  • I only use language that is respectful, fit for a “family newspaper.”
  • I see conflict as an opportunity for our company and our processes to get better – not a battle to defeat a peer.
  • I challenge disrespectful behavior in interactions I’m involved in or that I observe.
Rescooped by Sharon Archibald from digitalNow
Scoop.it!

Psychology's Three Great Branches

Psychology's Three Great Branches | Organizational Behaviour Fleming College | Scoop.it
Pairing the three great branches of psychology with three grand theorists.

Via Don Dea
more...
Don Dea's curator insight, June 17, 2013 12:08 AM

 The three branches are: 1) the basic science of psychology, whose proper subject matter is “mental behavior” which translates into the behavior of the animal as a whole and includes thinking and feeling as well as acting; 2) human psychology, whose proper subject matter is human behavior at the individual level and includes a particular focus on the human mind and human self-consciousness; and 3) professional psychology, which involves the application of psychological knowledge for human betterment. If the APA started with these three great branches, much confusion could be avoided and we could actually make progress starting to clear up psychology’s tower of babel.

Scooped by Sharon Archibald
Scoop.it!

By Paying Employees To Live Near The Office, Imo Cuts Commutes, Ups Happiness

By Paying Employees To Live Near The Office, Imo Cuts Commutes, Ups Happiness | Organizational Behaviour Fleming College | Scoop.it
There's that one guy who commuted seven hours a day and claimed to love it. But for most people, the daily commute is something we dread. The average commute time in America is 25 minutes, per the Census Bureau (with great variation by region).
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharon Archibald
Scoop.it!

Why Faking Enthusiasm Is The Latest Job Requirement

Why Faking Enthusiasm Is The Latest Job Requirement | Organizational Behaviour Fleming College | Scoop.it
"Important to smile. Don't forget smile."Sooner or later, most jobs require us to exhibit some emotion that we don't necessarily feel.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharon Archibald
Scoop.it!

Don't Tolerate Dysfunctional Teams

Don't Tolerate Dysfunctional Teams | Organizational Behaviour Fleming College | Scoop.it
Are teams in your organization both productive (they get their tasks done to standard, on time, and under budget) and effective (team members operate with a minimum of issues or drama)? A recent Un...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharon Archibald
Scoop.it!

From Zappos: 4 Simple Hacks To Foster Office Collaboration

From Zappos: 4 Simple Hacks To Foster Office Collaboration | Organizational Behaviour Fleming College | Scoop.it
Zappos has a cubicle problem. The online retailer is famous for its fanatical devotion to both customer service and corporate “cultural fit,” going so far as to pay insufficiently committed new hires as much as $2,000 to leave.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharon Archibald
Scoop.it!

Susan Cain Helped Introverts Find Their Voice; Now, She'll Teach Them To Embrace Public Speaking

Susan Cain Helped Introverts Find Their Voice; Now, She'll Teach Them To Embrace Public Speaking | Organizational Behaviour Fleming College | Scoop.it
"Now I'm speaking for a living," Susan Cain says, "which is so ironic for someone like me."Someone like her, in case you haven't heard, is an introvert: No, not a recluse, hermit, or antisocialite, but a person who prefers low stimulation to high,...
more...
No comment yet.