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Open Learning and Costs of Education

A group project report prepared for EDDE 804 at Ed. D., Athabasca University, Canada in 2011

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, suifaijohnmak
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Using peer–support to connect learning network participants to each other: an interdisciplinary approach - International Journal of Learning Technology - Volume 7, Number 4/2012 - Inderscience Publ...

Using peer–support to connect learning network participants to each other: an interdisciplinary approach - International Journal of Learning Technology - Volume 7, Number 4/2012 - Inderscience Publ... | Open science | Scoop.it

Via Steven Verjans
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Paulo Moekotte's comment, February 26, 2013 2:05 PM
Quite interesting to see that you're investigating 'ad hoc' and 'transient' connections and end up with the question about lasting learning connections in networks. I guess that whenever the connections seem to outlast the fulfillment of primary short term goals and needs, network relations might transform to more 'community like' relations. This 'difference' in characterizing the relations does resonate with the gradual difference that Wenger, Trayner and De Laat make, when talking about networks and communities. And this difference can even be traced back to the way Howard Rheingold differentiated networks and communities.

With regard to the decentralising effect it could probably be interesting to investigate if this effect can be related to what Mejias calls paranodality, i.e. an effect residing in between nodes that can distort a nodocentric view or paradigm that is typical for the network. Mejias even states that paranodality is a necessity in order to prevent networks to turn into echo chambers, i.e. exert a nodocentric view. So not only the number of nodes that are influential might generate this decentralizing effect but probably also the paradigmatic 'space' between the nodes and paranodal tendencies of certain nodes.

Furhtermore I would like to point out the blogposts of Kai Pata, who is involved in the IST 7th Framework Learning Layers project, about differences between communities and networks and classical principles of CoP's (http://tihane.wordpress.com/).

Coming back to your questions about the 'value' of investing in long term learning connections. The answer may even be as simple as that people like to flock with like minded. The primary networkbased connection that was more 'object oriented' (the 'object oriented sociality' described by Knorr Cetina and elaborated by Engeström) can evolve to 'people oriented sociality' (can be traced back to Rheingolds concept of 'virtual community' and related to Jenkins' concept of 'participatory culture') were the 'learning' is more socially and culturally contextualised and determined and less professionally.
Peter B. Sloep's comment, February 28, 2013 5:03 AM
Paulo, it makes a lot of sense what your write. I have been thinking for several years already about i) how to differentiate communities and networks, ii) how to use these notions to describe the dynamics of online social networks. For me, but I don't think for Etienne Wenger, the network is the more encompassing entity, which consists of lots of partly overlapping communities. People constantly update their relationship with communities, strengthening or weakening the links with people in the communities. People in communities have a shared goal, and work together towards achieving that. Once that goal is reached, the community loses its function for them. Networks are not just collections of people who are organized in communities, they also are a valuable resource of people who could potentially become members of communities, helping to achieve the community's goal. I have never worked this out in full depth, however, the first attempt can be found here (http://hdl.handle.net/1820/1198). It is a paper given at a rather obscure conference in New Zealand, which is why it is difficult to access. I is called Fostering Sociability in Learning Networks through ad-hoc transient communities.
Paulo Moekotte's comment, March 2, 2013 2:45 PM
Peter, thanks for pointing to your article. I'll take a look at it.
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Website for new open-access journal, eLife, introduced today - Phys.Org (press release)

Website for new open-access journal, eLife, introduced today - Phys.Org (press release) | Open science | Scoop.it
Website for new open-access journal, eLife, introduced todayPhys.Org (press release)eLife, the open-access journal for outstanding advances in life science and biomedicine, reveals a fresh approach to presenting and using scientific content on its...
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Rescooped by Håkan Olin from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
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As We May Think: A 1945 Essay on Information Overload, “Curation,” and Open-Access Science | Brain Pickings

As We May Think: A 1945 Essay on Information Overload, “Curation,” and Open-Access Science | Brain Pickings | Open science | Scoop.it

Tim O’Reilly recently admonished that unless we embrace open access over copyright, we’ll never get science policy right. The sentiment, which I believe applies to more than science, reminded me of an eloquent 1945 essay by Vannevar Bush, then-director of the Office of Scientific Research and Development, titled “As We May Think.”As the war, with its exploitation of science and technology, draws to a close, Bush turns a partly concerned, partly hopeful eye to where scientists will rediscover “objectives worthy of their best” and calls for “a new relationship between thinking man and the sum of our knowledge.”

 

Much of what Bush discusses presages present conversations about information overload, filtering, and our restless “FOMO” — fear of missing out, for anyone who did miss out on the memetic catchphrase — amidst the incessant influx. Bush worries about the impossibility of ever completely catching up and the unfavorable signal-to-noise ratio:

 

Click headline to read more and access hot links--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Will Open Access Save the Monograph? | Open Science

Will Open Access Save the Monograph? | Open Science | Open science | Scoop.it
Will Open Access Save the Monograph? 2 Replies. When it comes to publishing, the humanities and social sciences have slightly different customs than other disciplines. One of these traditions is the publishing of ...
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Open Access and scientific breakthroughs | Open Science

Open Access and scientific breakthroughs | Open Science | Open science | Scoop.it
A few days ago, The Chronicle of Higher Education published an article by Peter Suber and Darius Cuplinskas, daringly entitled “Open Access to Scientific Research Can Save Lives”. It relates the case of 15 year-old Jack ...
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Open science event in London this weekend - Boing Boing

Open science event in London this weekend - Boing Boing | Open science | Scoop.it
If you're in London this weekend, you should know that the Wellcome Trust is sponsoring a two-day bioscience hackathon with prizes awarded for the best ideas in four categories: Open Me — collecting data on yourself and ...
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Open science event in London this weekend - Boing Boing

Boing BoingOpen science event in London this weekendBoing BoingIf you're in London this weekend, you should know that the Wellcome Trust is sponsoring a two-day bioscience hackathon with prizes awarded for the best ideas in four categories: Open Me...
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Keeping up with MOOC developments | Tony Bates

Keeping up with MOOC developments | Tony Bates | Open science | Scoop.it

"MOOCs are a very interesting development, and have some potential to bring about major changes in the post-secondary education system.

 

However, they are only a side show to most online educational developments. Many other interesting things are happening and these are being drowned out by the hysteria and hyperbole surrounding MOOCs. It seems any new development in online learning has to be called a MOOC to get any recognition (even if it is neither massive nor open).

 

We need to get back to a sense of proportion here. It’s not the number of enrolments that matters, but the learning that takes place. For-credit online programs have had to prove that students can learn just as well online as on campus. There is over 20 years experience of what works and what doesn’t in credit-based online learning that is being ignored in most (but not all) MOOC developments. Not a single MOOC has been able to demonstrate clear learning gains for the students (or a viable financial model, for that matter). When that happens, they deserve to be taken seriously. Until then, I suggest you focus on the real world."


Via Peter B. Sloep, Steven Verjans
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Steven Verjans's curator insight, February 9, 2013 8:47 AM

I would be quite interested in some research about the learning effect of MOOCs

Peter B. Sloep's comment, February 11, 2013 6:27 AM
Agree, see my scoop of Cameron Norman today, who asks for the same kind of research. The problem is likely to be that the learning effect so situation dependent and is determined by the learner and his or her specific situation. It is hardly possible to answer that question in the way we may compare the effects of various pain killers.
Anne Whaits's comment, February 15, 2013 6:00 PM
I too wait with bated breath for some research on the effectiveness of MOOC's..whether they be of the cMOOC variety or the xMOOC. Until then, I am wetting my toes as a participant in the #OLDSMOOC's on Learning Design. An interesting experience as student.
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InOpen Tech adds fun to computer science learning eyes Rs 20-cr funding - Business Standard

InOpen Tech adds fun to computer science learning eyes Rs 20-cr fundingBusiness StandardThe lessons are based on free and open source software. The Computer Masti toolkit can be installed on commonly used operating systems.
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Stanford scientist sets sail on new publishing model with launch of open ... - Scope (blog)

Stanford scientist sets sail on new publishing model with launch of open ... - Scope (blog) | Open science | Scoop.it
Scope (blog)Stanford scientist sets sail on new publishing model with launch of open ...Scope (blog)While the study is noteworthy in itself, the fact that its findings appear in the first issue of eLife, a newly launched open-access journal, rather...
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Benefits of Open Access for Authors | Open Science

Benefits of Open Access for Authors | Open Science | Open science | Scoop.it
The validity of the Open Access model is constantly being debated when it comes to scientific publishing. Many researchers are still uncertain whether to publish in this model or not. What are then the benefits of publishing in ...
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Open Science Challenge awards $16K Research Funding

Assay Depot Inc., the world's largest online research services marketplace, and Genspace selected four citizen scientists as winners for the first Tri-State Open Science Challenge.
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InnoCentive and Scientific American Partner to Facilitate Open Innovation - Crowdsourcing.org

InnoCentive and Scientific American Partner to Facilitate Open InnovationCrowdsourcing.orgInnoCentive and Scientific American Partner to Facilitate Open Innovation. document Open Innovation.
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Open science spreads with new version of mMass spectrometry tool ...

How one scientist learned Python, tweaked mMass software code, and published new tool via PLoS ONE.
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